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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Got my replacement for the Moritaka - Masamoto KS Gyuto 270mm.



It's 270mm. If you look at the moritaka above and this knife, you'll see that the shape of the knife is different - I much prefer this shape, as I'm more accustomed to the French mode of cutting poo poo.

Plus it's real big.

That wooden sheathy thing is called a Saya, and they're kind of expensive and silly but they're nice for carbon knives because, being wood, they absorb some of the invisible moisture that remains after wiping the knife. I think that's the idea, anyways.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Jul 27, 2013 around 12:31

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Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

adorai posted:

Like I said, I only use it on vegetables. It's very distinctive in comparison to my Chefs knife. If this one broke, I would go buy another. I used to hate slicing tomatoes, because I would have to hone my blade every time basically to get a nice thinly sliced tomato. Now I know I can cut my 1/16th" tomato slice every time with the knife straight out of the drawer.

That actually happened to me, breaking a ceramic knife trying to slice cheese. That's uncanny. Weird thing is I usually use a veg peeler or a grater for cheese. Crazy.
Adorai I think the thing here is you found a sharp and thin knife. It happens to be ceramic, it's also different to the thick and blunt steel knives you are used to, so it cuts way better.
The point is there are lots of sharp thin knives out there that will never break on you and may cost $50. Have a look at Tojiro DP/3.
I bought a nakiri and gyuto, not only can it cut tomatoes 1/16th", it can probably do it in free air without a chopping board to lean on.
I had ceramic knives ( a small set of them, only one broke - with cheese - the others I still tended to favour and they worked OK after I learned my lesson), but there is no comparison between them and a relatively cheap Japanese brand steel knife like a tojiro dp/3.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Chef De Cuisinart posted:

Cleavers shouldn't have handles. It should just be like a razor sharp bench knife.

lol

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



GrAviTy84 posted:

doop doop I got a new thing:


moritaka aogami super 240mm gyuto by gtrwndr87, on Flickr

Picked up No Wave's Moritaka. I'm shocked at how light this thing is, it's kind of ridiculous, but I love it. Haven't had any time using it yet, it could use a bit of time on a waterstone though so I might do that first.

Thinned a bit and put a new edge on this sucker with a bester 1.2k and then stropped generously on balsa with chromium oxide powder and then again on some iron oxide powder. holy poo poo so sharp.

I did notice that the heel end of the blade could use a bit of work. It kind of protrudes ever so slightly relative to the rest of the blade and is probably why No Wave had a hell of a time with swoopychopping with it. I don't really have any stones to work off this kind of a thing though, and I've never done any blade reprofiling, and it's not really that bad for my style of chopping so I may just see if I can live with it for a bit.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Just thin the heel. It'll take a while if you don't have a low grit stone.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Apologies for the problem with the knife. I may have a make-up gift for you.


Realistically, the reason I got rid of it is because there's this dude boar_d_laze who posts on some other knife forums who seems like a sick genius and I just decided to do everything he said.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



No Wave posted:

Apologies for the problem with the knife. I may have a make-up gift for you.


Realistically, the reason I got rid of it is because there's this dude boar_d_laze who posts on some other knife forums who seems like a sick genius and I just decided to do everything he said.

It's not bad at all. I have a tadatsuna INOX petty that came with a similar problem (slightly imperfect heel edge).

curious what this make up gift is though

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


I made a few borosilicate honing rods.



I was thinking I'd send you that and you could keep it and you could tell me if it's all hosed up. I have a few extras, just kind of curious to get another perspective on how it turned out and I don't really know any other spergy cooks. I mean that as a compliment.

Just let me know if you (gravity) are interested, and I'll send it off.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Jul 30, 2013 around 23:41

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


No Wave posted:

I made a few borosilicate honing rods.



You actually made glass honing rods? From raw silica and other stuff? If so, I would really like to see your oven setup

Sir Spaniard
Nov 9, 2009



Hauki, where did you order that custom knife from? I'm looking at a custom knife as a birthday present for my dad, as well as one for myself possibly. And I like the price of that one.

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


TATPants posted:

You actually made glass honing rods? From raw silica and other stuff? If so, I would really like to see your oven setup

Can't you just buy the premade borosilicate rod and have someone cut it down to size?

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

I just bought a good ol' no name carbon steel Chinese cleaver. I've been using a cheap stainless Shibazi cleaver now for about a month now. The Shibazi is a fantastic knife, despite the slippery metal handle and milquetoast steel. Also, it's better than any western knife for eleven dollars or less. I'm totally loving using the cleaver instead of my chef knife, and I have a whole heap of questions about my new one:

It came with a reaallly rough convex edge that does not slice anything well at all. Is this by design, or is it safe to assume that it's a fit and finish thing? Is it proper to maintain a fairly obtuse convex grind, or would I do better to reprofile it and/or cut some bevels? If so, what sort of bevel should I put on this thing so that it slices efficiently but also stands up to its own weight?

The blade is much thicker than what I am accustomed to. It is about 5mm wide at the base and tapers down to 2mm at the tip. My old cleaver is 2mm all the way through. Any recommendations for how to reprofile it, if that's what I should do? I've got everything from a belt sander to files to Sharpmaker to sandpaper, so I can do basically anything to this guy.

Is there a difference between a "chopping" cleaver and a "slicing" cleaver? Will this one still work well for thinly slicing vegetables, if I fix it up correctly? What the hell did I just buy, basically? I'm just some gringo who really likes knives and I think I totally fell in over my head. I was just happy to find a carbon steel cleaver that wasn't obviously made for dismantling pigs, and I want to start using it.

Here are some pictures, that somebody might actually read this post:



Anyone know if this says anything important?



Just as you suspected, it's a boring ol' Chinese cleaver



Here is the thickness of the new cleaver vs. the old


Help me GWS, you're my only hope. What do I have? What do I need to do?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



No Wave posted:

I made a few borosilicate honing rods.



I was thinking I'd send you that and you could keep it and you could tell me if it's all hosed up. I have a few extras, just kind of curious to get another perspective on how it turned out and I don't really know any other spergy cooks. I mean that as a compliment.

Just let me know if you (gravity) are interested, and I'll send it off.

nice build! PM sent.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Sir Spaniard posted:

Hauki, where did you order that custom knife from? I'm looking at a custom knife as a birthday present for my dad, as well as one for myself possibly. And I like the price of that one.

it's from Moritaka Hamono ( http://www.moritakahamono.com/en/index.html). For custom orders you can just email them asking for a price quote. You can get silly spergy with exact dimensions of the blade, etc. Some people have drawn a silhouette of specifically the blade they want and sent in the drawing.

Sir Spaniard
Nov 9, 2009



Thanks. I thought so but I couldn't see a link in his posts. Those are some really nice looking knives for a decent price. Any words on quality?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Sir Spaniard posted:

Thanks. I thought so but I couldn't see a link in his posts. Those are some really nice looking knives for a decent price. Any words on quality?

A lot of people have them and love them. I just got mine last week so I haven't had too much time with it to have an experienced opinion but it does take a wicked sharp edge. It is probably the cheapest aogami super knife (aside from the dojos). There are a few others in this thread besides me and hauki that have moritakas too. Ricola has a 330 mm custom gyuto (Lol). I think breakfall has a nikiri and maybe another I don't remember. All in all its a pretty solid maker I think.

The kurouchi rubs off easier than most as was discussed a few pages ago, but kurouchi rubs off on all of these kurouchi'd knives eventually.

It is a super spergy carbon steel so I would take that into consideration when giving it as a gift. Is the recipient going to be willing to keep it dry and wiped down etc or are they going to toss it in the dish washer and leave it at the bottom of the sink and other poo poo people do to their knives.

Sir Spaniard
Nov 9, 2009



It's for my dad who was a chef way back when. He has a sabatier which is older than I am which he keeps in the original box. So he'll definitely be looking after it. I'm all in.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


TATPants posted:

You actually made glass honing rods? From raw silica and other stuff? If so, I would really like to see your oven setup

Scott808 posted:

Can't you just buy the premade borosilicate rod and have someone cut it down to size?
Yeah... you can only buy pyrex/borosilicate rods in increments of 60" but I found someone who could cut it into five pieces. So it's that and foosball parts.

Sir Spaniard
Nov 9, 2009



Steve Yun posted:

Haha, jar gaskets?



So I bought these after reading about it, to try at work. Wonders never cease. Such an ingenious use of those things. Did the guy who introduced you wash them I'm the dishwasher or just by hand? I imagine they'd wear out over time through a professional dishwasher?

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Sir Spaniard posted:

Thanks. I thought so but I couldn't see a link in his posts. Those are some really nice looking knives for a decent price. Any words on quality?
I've only had mine for a couple weeks as well, but so far it's a great knife. F&F out of the box was very good, and like grav said, it can take a wicked edge. I looked for a couple weeks at all manner of sujihikis & yanagibas, and this seemed by far the best fit for me without multiplying my budget two- or three-fold. For what it's worth, it's also cheaper to order directly from the shop in Japan than from a US importer even if you're just ordering regular stock and not something custom.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Sir Spaniard posted:

So I bought these after reading about it, to try at work. Wonders never cease. Such an ingenious use of those things. Did the guy who introduced you wash them I'm the dishwasher or just by hand? I imagine they'd wear out over time through a professional dishwasher?
By hand, if I recall correctly, primarily because people didn't want to lose theirs. I was in France so we were probably a little less thorough, but usually there was a point at which we'd fill up a bucket with soap and hot water, throw in stuff at a station that wasn't knives, and then rinse off/dry the stuff. Sometimes the gaskets made it in there.

I think some of them were a little cracked from going through the dishwasher a few times, but realistically they should be able to take a decent amount of abuse given what they're used for. Honestly they could probably stand to be beaten up a little bit - they'll probably get softer and rougher, and thus more grippy.

So glad you tried it out! The white ones I linked in my old post worked out well, but I think the orange color is prettier and you're less likely to lose track of it.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



woooo! Moritaka is christened...with the blood of its master. That tip is brutal. Just barely nicked my pinky with it while slicing up some chicken.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


GrAviTy84 posted:

woooo! Moritaka is christened...with the blood of its master. That tip is brutal. Just barely nicked my pinky with it while slicing up some chicken.

Blood for the Knife God.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Don't clean it, it's good for the patina.

Sir Spaniard
Nov 9, 2009



First blood. Nice.

Has anyone you mentioned gotten a wa style handle through them, that's come off? Or is it held in securely somehow? I'm super paranoid the blade would come out randomly from the handle.

breakfall87
Apr 22, 2004
ABunch7587's little bitch

I've never had a wa-style handle fall off or even get loose, for that matter. If they aren't epoxied in and sealed, a lot of times they are burned in and sealed, but usually you can tell right away if it is of low quality.

And chiming back in on the Moritaka love, I'm the one with the nakiri, and it's honestly probably my most used knife. The finish rubs off with a quickness, but few things can take an edge like it can. One of our prep cooks has one of their pettys and she loves the little thing.

To whoever mentioned earlier that they were afraid of re-profiling their blade, if you have experience sharpening your blade, then you will be just fine. As long as you make sure to touch up the entire blade, and not just the problem area, you will be fine. Otherwise you are more likely to create an uneven cutting surface. It also helps to let your knife naturally dull a bit before taking it to a low grit, because you don't want to be running a razor sharp tip across those stones.

gobboboy
Jun 5, 2006

The pride of PITR

I'm probably a gigantic knife noob for this, but I've been considering getting this Damascus chef's knife.

http://www.amazon.com/Yoshihiro-Cut...h/dp/B00D6DVUCK

After weighing what I've heard, I'd like to get a japanese knife to try it out and I absolutely love the look of Damascus steel. Is this a good one to go with or is there something very wrong with this that I should know? Does Damascus sharpen normally with a water stone?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



gobboboy posted:

I'm probably a gigantic knife noob for this, but I've been considering getting this Damascus chef's knife.

http://www.amazon.com/Yoshihiro-Cut...h/dp/B00D6DVUCK

After weighing what I've heard, I'd like to get a japanese knife to try it out and I absolutely love the look of Damascus steel. Is this a good one to go with or is there something very wrong with this that I should know? Does Damascus sharpen normally with a water stone?

That is the same OEM knife as a togiharu or a JCK gekko, et al. It is a good knife, I have a gekko myself and it is fantastic. Iirc breakfall's first was a togiharu and he loved it. The edge itself is vg 10 the Damascus is just cladding so you can expect vg10 performance (beginner friendly, easy to sharpen, holds a great edge). 7 inches is pretty small though, at least for me. Maybe consider sizing up.

Hauki
May 11, 2010



GrAviTy84 posted:

That is the same OEM knife as a togiharu or a JCK gekko, et al. It is a good knife, I have a gekko myself and it is fantastic. Iirc breakfall's first was a togiharu and he loved it. The edge itself is vg 10 the Damascus is just cladding so you can expect vg10 performance (beginner friendly, easy to sharpen, holds a great edge). 7 inches is pretty small though, at least for me. Maybe consider sizing up.
I would definitely get more than 7". I also have a JCK gekko (well, the wa-handled 9.5" version) and it's pretty nice. I though they were cheaper than the one you linked through JCK though I could be wrong.

gobboboy
Jun 5, 2006

The pride of PITR

Yeah, I have an 8" currently so I guess I'll stick with that. Glad to hear sharpening would go just as easy. I'm pretty happy with the price but I guess that has to do with only 16 damascus layers. Thanks guys!

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


gobboboy posted:

Yeah, I have an 8" currently so I guess I'll stick with that. Glad to hear sharpening would go just as easy. I'm pretty happy with the price but I guess that has to do with only 16 damascus layers. Thanks guys!

I really wish people would stop calling pattern welding "damascus", it's loving dumb.

gobboboy
Jun 5, 2006

The pride of PITR

WHAT HAVE I DONE!?

owl milk
Jun 28, 2011


Are these Tojiro knives easy to break? I'm going to be living in a dorm with 5 other people and although I'll try to forbid their use I'd like to be able to come home from classes without fear.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Haam posted:

Are these Tojiro knives easy to break? I'm going to be living in a dorm with 5 other people and although I'll try to forbid their use I'd like to be able to come home from classes without fear.

Unless they're super super respectful of your stuff, any knife you buy and put in a 5 person dorm kitchen will get wrecked to poo poo. Any knife. Get forschners and use their eventual wrecked to shitness to practice sharpening and blade repair skills. Or get a knife roll and be the guy who takes his cooking gear back to his room after he's done cooking.

Edit. Or you can go the other route and get such a big and "scary" knife that no one ever uses it. I had a decent sized carbon steel Chinese cleaver when I lived with housemates in college. I could leave it in the kitchen because no one ever used it because it was "scary".

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Aug 2, 2013 around 07:14

owl milk
Jun 28, 2011


drat, was hoping that wouldn't be the case. Guess I'll just order this set and a honing rod then.

Would you recommend a waterstone or an oilstone with these cheap knives? I'm thinking a cheap double-sided oil would be good as I'd rather not pay more on the sharpener than the knives, haha.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





deimos posted:

I really wish people would stop calling pattern welding "damascus", it's loving dumb.

got dat hattori hanzo steel

been jerkin off to uma thurman pictures for weekkkssssss

Damienz
Sep 4, 2012



After reading this thread I realized that my old IKEA knife wasn't enough anymore.

Bought this yesterday, a Satake No Vac (21cm = 8 inches). So far so good, and I've only cut myself twice...



EDIT: Wrong length, corrected.

Damienz fucked around with this message at Aug 2, 2013 around 17:26

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

No offense, but that knife looks hilarious.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Ricola-kun, tell me
about pizza cones!


Like, it's the knife they used in kitchens in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. The knife that Alfred uses to prepare Bruce Wayne's tea in the animated Batman series.

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The Third Man
Nov 5, 2005

I know how much you like ponies so I got you a ponies avatar bro


it even has speed holes to improve airflow and cooling as you dice things that are no more than 2cm tall

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