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bring back old gbs
Feb 28, 2007

I'm a very strong saiyan. Very strong. Probably the strongest ever.


Alright! Extending the step/direction wires worked terribly!! All the motion was jittery. I went back to my crappy breadboard and everything worked flawlessly. So now I'm just extending the motor wires like I should have done in the first place. Like I was going to figure out a method that entire industries just glossed over lol

So now I've got motion!

https://i.imgur.com/89jVOPC.mp4

TMC2130 drivers are legit. I don't know if this will upload with audio but the noise you can hear is my PC on the other side of the room. it's 100:1 reduction ratio so I didn't think it was even working at first, the steps were so tiny and the thing was so quiet I had to look inside to confirm the gears were even moving.

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NewFatMike
Jun 11, 2015



I recall seeing a few posts ITT over the years asking for a decent place for endmills in Canadia. I needed a specific endmill for a super rush job and stumbled upon this place: https://www.sharptech-inc.com

I was able to get it the next business day in the USA, and their selection looks non-horrible depending on your tooling situation.

mattfl
Aug 27, 2004

Super Benintendo!


My brother just got a Shapeoko XXL CNC. He's been sending me pics as he's setting it up and I started to look into them a little more. I have a 3d printer and the similarities between them are pretty cool. Anyone else here have one or similar and are there any tips/tricks I should pass onto him before he gets too into it?

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


I've been using the XXL since it came out and the SO3 since before then. It's much, much more user friendly now that the software and limit switches actually work. Just make sure it's level and square. If this is his first cnc router, he needs to understand the importance of workflow to productivity: be comfortable with your software (i use vcarve), commit to some form of workholding (I recommend masking tape and superglue, get a small pry bar to remove), pay the money for a suckit dust boot and a good dust collector, buy a relay to turn on the spindle and vacuum by software through a 5v signal (like $20 on amazon, requires light soldering). buy a few 1/4-1/8" precision collets.

Wandering Orange
Sep 8, 2012



Whatever amount is spent on just the machine will be spent again on tooling, work holding, dust/chip removal, cooling, etc. So they should have a realistic budget above the cost of the router.

NewFatMike
Jun 11, 2015



Anyone have any good resources on Universal GCode sender? I've inherited as a volunteer position a Shapeoko 2 with an attached computer. It's a hackerspace, so I need to do some forensic work on whether the control board is even stock.

ante
Apr 9, 2005

No... Not without incident.

That seems like a strange rabbit hole to go down.

Check to make sure the PCB is what you expect, check that the firmware is as expected - I dunno what the board is, but if it's one of the common ones, you should be able to easily flash whatever popular firmware is around lately. Is marlin still a thing?

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


NewFatMike posted:

Anyone have any good resources on Universal GCode sender? I've inherited as a volunteer position a Shapeoko 2 with an attached computer. It's a hackerspace, so I need to do some forensic work on whether the control board is even stock.
Stock control board for a Shapeoko 2 was a Arduino Uno with a grblshield. So you'd tether to a computer with Universal GCode Sender (or some similar program) and serve the gcode over USB to the arduino Uno.

Here's a few links.
https://wiki.shapeoko.com/index.php/ShapeOko_2
https://synthetos.myshopify.com/products/gshield-v5
https://winder.github.io/ugs_website/

One thing to be aware of is Synthetos has changed pinouts in various versions of the grblshield firmware for the Uno, so if you upgrade it you might find stuff like limit switches suddenly don't work (because they were moved for something else).

I used to have a Shapeoko 2 some years ago, if there are any specific questions let me know and I'll try to remember the answers.

NewFatMike
Jun 11, 2015



Thanks! That is all enormously helpful. Hopefully I'll be able to get some stuff going on it so folks can do some machinable wax mold masters or something on there.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

Maybe straight out of the "hobby" section of things but whatever.

What starts showing up as day to day maintenance to preserve capability of big boy machines. For a more concrete example - say I'm a hobbyist who won't be using things every day. Say I have a climate controlled shop with 3 phase. I know maintenance and stuff on a manual Bridgeport style machine - how hard is it to keep something like a used Fadal VMC to where it can keep making chips? I'm not talking like "something broke" maintenance, but the kind of stuff where if you don't keep up with it, it won't work the next time you try to make chips. Or equivalent lathe vs South Bend.

I'm looking a few years out at what I want to add for machining capability - all for hobby use, so I'm tolerant of "something might break that I need to dick around with fixing" because things going down doesn't cost me paying jobs, but I need to be more educated on subjects like "if you don't do $foo, $bar, and $baz everything will turn to expensive scrap." Tormach style stuff isn't off the table, but I can't help but think that, since I have the room and the time to fix minor stuff, used iron could be a lot better bang per buck.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

The issue is parts availability and cost.

A motor for a Bridgeport is under a grand. A spindle is cheap (or just swap the head entirely) for the same. Parts are everywhere, everyone knows how to work on them, and there are amazing videos from HW that show everything. Even clapped out, it'll be worth a grand when you sell.

A Fadal control board is going to be $2500, and there are exactly four of them in the country, a spindle is $5000, and a 10 week wait. The control might only take floppies or gcode at 2400baud, and the CRT is obsolete. There are 2 people that still work on them and one is a nutjob that only response to a Yahoo group (and he's the technical one). These are pulled out of my rear end prices, but you get the idea. If you buy a CNC, make sure it's a widely available model with preferably a local company that knows them. Oh, and if it ever breaks and you want to sell, you'll be PAYING for it to be hauled to the scrapyard. This isn't a 2000# Bridgeport that you can toss on a uhaul flatbed.

I've watched dozens of older CNC machines get scrapped because they cost more to move than they're worth. In a hobbyist shop, they're not much use because they aren't easy to program, they rarely have conversational controls, you're making one or two parts (not thousands like they were designed for), you don't have any programs to draw from, and you're one broken part away from a big bill repair or even worse, a 15,000# paperweight.

Here's an example: https://www.machinetools.com/en/for...C9mYWRhbA%3D%3D

That's not a big machine (20"x20"x16"), but it's 10,000# and 15hp. I don't know how big your 3P service is, but the parts to hook up a 15hp machine aren't cheap. Cat30 tool holders aren't cheap. Tooling isn't cheap. I've been tempted. If I go CNC, it'll be either a Haas or something like a used Tormach. My local machine shop runs a ton of Haas VF's, and they are happy with them.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 06:04 on Dec 25, 2019

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


NewFatMike posted:

Thanks! That is all enormously helpful. Hopefully I'll be able to get some stuff going on it so folks can do some machinable wax mold masters or something on there.
Anytime! I don't remember to check this thread that often so if you have a question and I don't respond please feel free to PM me. I can't remember a whole lot about the shapeoko 2 aside from the basics but I might be able to help dig it up at the least.

There were some folks who made upgrades to the z-axis and such, no idea if they're still doing that since the 3 has been out for some time. But you can rebuild the 2 into an X-Carve if ever needed.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

I have enough single phase to run that with a rotary converter - and 3 phase is on the pole. I'm not wired up for it yet, and for that matter don't have a shop built. I'm thinking ahead.

Fadal was picked in this instance because the service manuals are all available, most repair parts are industrial standard parts, and there's lots of spares for the stuff that isn't. Also they're relatively commonly retrofitted to modern controls - there's off the shelf packages to do so for that matter.

But that's under the "fixing it when something breaks" or hotrodding it... what I was asking about was more the day to day.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

The day to day is easy, most run auto lube systems. Clean air, good coolant, clean oil. But don't think this is a Bridgeport, the supplies aren't cheap. Fadal is decent but there are plenty of custom parts and non standard parts.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

I don't expect things to not be a bit of a project if getting a used machine - to my mind, "there's downtime while I fix things" is acceptable for what I'm doing and means I can have far more machine for my money. I'm just trying to get an idea for the stuff I don't know about and can't easily find numbers on. Anyway, cool... will see if it still looks like a good idea in a couple years or if I just bite the bullet and go Tormach, who after all are local-ish.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Honestly, you might do well posting on HSM or chaski and asking. I'd avoid practical machinist, as the crowd there is... Unpleasant, unless you're a pro.

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


sharkytm posted:

Honestly, you might do well posting on HSM or chaski and asking. I'd avoid practical machinist, as the crowd there is... Unpleasant, unless you're a pro.

I was a pro (in 2014) and still found them unpleasant.

Also +1 to your prev advice. There’s not a ton of day to day maintenance for a VMC. If you’re going to make money with it, take a serious look at financing/leasing a Haas (or similar).

When I looked years ago it was pretty easy to justify the payments for a brand new machine versus a large capital outlay for a good condition used one.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

Speaking of a VMC: https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink/to...link_source=app

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

CarForumPoster posted:

I was a pro (in 2014) and still found them unpleasant.

Also +1 to your prev advice. There’s not a ton of day to day maintenance for a VMC. If you’re going to make money with it, take a serious look at financing/leasing a Haas (or similar).

When I looked years ago it was pretty easy to justify the payments for a brand new machine versus a large capital outlay for a good condition used one.

I'm pretty much explicitly not planning to make money with it, as that's not my skillset or really an interest I have. If I can't fund it like hobby stuff, I'm not doing it.

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


mekilljoydammit posted:

I'm pretty much explicitly not planning to make money with it, as that's not my skillset or really an interest I have. If I can't fund it like hobby stuff, I'm not doing it.

Oh, then there’s a huge range of options, mostly centered around work envelope and max tool length requirements.

Get a cheap digital height gage to set your tool lengths.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

LOL, maybe be sidestepping this all by finding a deal on a smallish lathe to CNC convert... which is totally not a strategy that I'd unambiguously recommend but whatever, it seems fun to me.
VMC for later!

CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


mekilljoydammit posted:

LOL, maybe be sidestepping this all by finding a deal on a smallish lathe to CNC convert... which is totally not a strategy that I'd unambiguously recommend but whatever, it seems fun to me.
VMC for later!

I love CNC lathes but you can do WAY more as a hobbyist with a VMC. Also a regular 13x40 lathe has much of the capability of a CNC lathe but the same is not true for a Bridgeport versus a VMC.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

CarForumPoster posted:

I love CNC lathes but you can do WAY more as a hobbyist with a VMC. Also a regular 13x40 lathe has much of the capability of a CNC lathe but the same is not true for a Bridgeport versus a VMC.

This isn't actually an either/or - VMC is an eventual in-a-few-years thing, lathe to convert is a next month thing. I already have a Bridgeport and a South Bend manual machine - but this will make some specific categories of little fiddly parts I want to do (shock absorber bits) much more efficient to make. Plus gets my feet wet on the specifics of making cnc stuff work, control-wise in case I completely lose my mind and find a "deal" on a VMC with good iron and bad controls.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


ran into a different sort of laser engraver on aliexpress for a couple hundred bucks, i'm absolutely certain this specific one is awful but it's the first time I've seen this particular arrangement before:



not gonna replace conventional gantry machines any time soon, but there probably is a legit niche for a portable marking/engraving system with a dumbed-down app interface. no idea if they can actually do acceptable work, tho- conventional laser cuttng machines always have that incredibly short and specific focal length that you accommodate through bed height adjustment, while this one claims an effective range of 20 cm or less. also looks like it's directing the laser from a single pivot point instead of a gantry's controlled/predictable geometries, which again, sounds like a higher price-point product, not a lower one. did someone figure out a cheap way to continually adjust a cutting laser's orientation + focus in a dynamic fashion while i wasn't looking, or (more likely) is it just a lovely gimmick-grade laser marking product?

Ambrose Burnside fucked around with this message at 21:32 on Jan 5, 2020

ante
Apr 9, 2005

No... Not without incident.

Watch the kickstarter video for the product that thing is ripping off and see the most horrible, cringe inducing danger product that will never ever ever be legal in any kind of way

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

mekilljoydammit posted:

This isn't actually an either/or - VMC is an eventual in-a-few-years thing, lathe to convert is a next month thing. I already have a Bridgeport and a South Bend manual machine - but this will make some specific categories of little fiddly parts I want to do (shock absorber bits) much more efficient to make. Plus gets my feet wet on the specifics of making cnc stuff work, control-wise in case I completely lose my mind and find a "deal" on a VMC with good iron and bad controls.

Decided that no, CNC converting that lathe in particular (Hardinge with no lead screw so would have to hack that in too) wasn't a great move.

Seriously looking at Sieg X2D stuff as ... it'll fit in the barn I have, rather than the shop I want to build.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


ante posted:

Watch the kickstarter video for the product that thing is ripping off and see the most horrible, cringe inducing danger product that will never ever ever be legal in any kind of way

i had a feeling. apparently it's optimized for a single cutting range of 190-200mm and needs to be oriented parallel to the workpiece just like a normal laser cutter, so the tripod just seems intended to make people think it's more useful than it actually is. its also v telling that it ships + is intended ot be used with a provided transparent enclosure, they just avoid showing that configuration b/c it immediately looks like the aliexpress-standard $100 'laser engraver' toy that it really is

the very long focal distance is prolly the only legit interesting/distinguishing thing about it, idk what a less stupid application for that would be tho

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


mekilljoydammit posted:

Decided that no, CNC converting that lathe in particular (Hardinge with no lead screw so would have to hack that in too) wasn't a great move.

Seriously looking at Sieg X2D stuff as ... it'll fit in the barn I have, rather than the shop I want to build.

I bought a CNC'd LMS 3990 (same mill) which works fine. I am going to build a coolant/chip containment housing out of plastic corrugated board when it warms up because it throws a mess everywhere.

NewFatMike
Jun 11, 2015



It's been super slow going, BUT THE HACKERSPACE SHAPEOKO LIVES!!!

Today was the first time I was really able to sit down and touch the machine for an extended period of time, but I have been researching the last week or so. Turns out, the biggest issue was the baud rate was not right on top of some combination of missing drivers, old firmware, and loose/dusty connections. But it's functional!

Usability is a good way off. Something about the default grbl post processor in Fusion 360 mandates putting in an M06 code and Universal GCode Sender wicked hates that. On the plus side, though, it's like the first line and pretty much just means hitting "Play" twice. It also wants to bring the spindle way to the right side after ending the program. After reactivating the limit switches, it's more of a soft failure. Gonna have to figure that out.

Mechanically, not bad. With some random 1/8" endmill in the drawer, I got 0.1mm variance over 50mm on the Y axis and 0.31mm over 50mm on the X axis. I think I'm just gonna call that good enough and probably substantially better than the shopbot the next room over.

Since I'm still figuring it all out for training courses on it, I had to leave a little message to indicate that it's all on the up and up:



E: turns out we have the carcasses to two more benchtop machines, so hopefully we'll have an easy peasy Easel one for simple engraving, one for plastics & metals, and one for foams and woods.

Since Fusion just added Eagle functionality, I'm hoping we can do some cool custom milled PCBs here!

NewFatMike fucked around with this message at 03:27 on Feb 24, 2020

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Anyone have any experience with Centroid? Looking at a custom application and need something with reliable analog inputs tied to a custom macro.

HolHorsejob
Mar 13, 2020

In the land of Hyrule, there echoes a legend. A legend held dearly by the Royal Family tells of a boy... A boy who, after battling evil and saving Hyrule, crept away from the land that made him a legend... Done with the battles he once waged across time, he embarked on a journey...


Any other folks with a taig mill? Anyone done their own ballscrew conversion?

I was recently given a cnc-ready taig mill, and, apart from the motors and body, all the hardware was used/free cobbled-together crap. I tore off all the crap and made a linuxcnc box w/ geckodrive to control it. Everything works, and now I want to replace the lovely leadscrew (not even acme thread wtf) with ballscrews. I've been searching for a build blog or something, but I haven't been able to find any detailed info on a build, just before-and-afters with no details on anything that came in between.

Anyone done this themselves? Or does anyone have a lead on ballscrews and the requisite bearing blocks for mounting them?

NewFatMike
Jun 11, 2015



I wish I could help, I'm just jealous about your project.

Ambrose Burnside
Aug 29, 2007

pensive


HolHorsejob posted:

Any other folks with a taig mill? Anyone done their own ballscrew conversion?

I was recently given a cnc-ready taig mill, and, apart from the motors and body, all the hardware was used/free cobbled-together crap. I tore off all the crap and made a linuxcnc box w/ geckodrive to control it. Everything works, and now I want to replace the lovely leadscrew (not even acme thread wtf) with ballscrews. I've been searching for a build blog or something, but I haven't been able to find any detailed info on a build, just before-and-afters with no details on anything that came in between.

Anyone done this themselves? Or does anyone have a lead on ballscrews and the requisite bearing blocks for mounting them?

I have a leadscrew CNC micro mill that I'd like to eventually upgrade with ballscrews as well; Soigeneris https://www.soigeneris.com/ is where I got my mill a couple of years ago and can recommend em as a solid vendor who provides great support for his products if you call him up and hash it out.

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

ask me about being the most obnoxious person of all time

Yooper posted:

Anyone have any experience with Centroid? Looking at a custom application and need something with reliable analog inputs tied to a custom macro.

Not with your custom application, but we have two retrofit bridgeport mills with that controller on them. They seem rock solid if "still functioning after 15-20 years of exposure to highly conductive graphite composite material machining" counts.

No idea what the modern controllers are like though.

Side note for everybody else: If you're looking to pick up a CAM skillset during the pandemic, MasterCAM University is offering free classes until June 30th if you sign up for some spam email via MyMastercam.com and then go to register at https://university.mastercam.com/

That's all of the 2d/3d Mill classes and even the STEM: Principles of Machining course, which looks pretty thorough at the glance I just gave the lesson plan.

mekilljoydammit
Jan 28, 2016

Me have motors that scream to 10,000rpm. Me have more cars than Pick and Pull

Ooh.

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

ask me about being the most obnoxious person of all time


Yeah, I wish there was a larger audience here at SA to promote this to but this is the only thread I can think of where it's relevant other than side discussions in the 3d printer thread.

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


It's starting to become warm enough for me to spend time in the garage. I've spent about six hours this week trying to clean up the pile of this winter's amazon boxes and random detritus. Project ideas:

Shapeoko 3 XXL continues to cruise along functionally. After five years of use I'm starting to think my dewalt spindle collet is getting harder to tighten. I continue to only use glue and tape for fixturing and it continues to work great. The last two Christmas' in a row I have thrown the XXL in the back of my truck and driven across the state to do CNC work for family during xmas vacation and it's taken the abuse like a champ. I really want a larger, more powerful CNC router for my projects with sheet goods than this machine so I'm thinking about some options:

1) Use my non-XXL extrusions to make extensions for X and Y, going from 33x33 to 48x48 or so of cutting area. This is sort of free, but I'd have to work out cable extensions, make the plugs to join extrusions, and use a few pieces of extrusion to extend the base. Worst case is it takes the machine offline for a while and doesn't work out at all. Still slow, still a terrible trim router collet and speed control system- an HDZ upgrade for $400 and a beefier spindle for $400 would attack the latter issues.

2) Incrementally build a larger, stouter machine. Getting a decently spec'd 4x4 (maybe 4x8?) router table moving seems like it could be done for 5k, provided you can weld your own base out of tubing. Maybe I am just wildly undervaluing what CNCRP is charging. Selling the Shapeoko would knock a dent out of that cost, too.

---

My CNC LMS 3990 sat dormant this winter. I've got most of what I need to make a plastic "enclosure" just to contain chips, but have yet to bring the whole plan together. I also have apprehension because it continues to be plagued by random e-stops picked up in the gecko controller and I have no fuckin idea how to make any progress on that. This issue has really made me resent the G540, even though it's probably my fault. I need to draw up a new stand and the enclosure, figure out how to extend the stepper wires, and then get off my rear end and actually build some metal poo poo.

---

Since my laser thread is dead: When I moved to my current house in 2018 my K40 unfortunately suffered some bumps and bruises. I finally replaced the cracked tube this weekend, then also noticed that a bunch of the wiring on the power supply had been knocked loose, ugh. All the rando china 40w power supplies use different labeling for their wiring and I didn't remember how this one was set up, but I did remember taking a picture of it a few years ago which I was able to find. I've got the controller and motion side working fine, but my first test fire of the laser produced a loud pop and no laser beam. Hopefully it's a wiring issue I can fix and not another dead tube; I didn't purchase this replacement, when I originally bought the K40 it came with a cracked water inlet tube. I sent a photo of it to the seller and they mailed me a new tube from china inside of a pvc pipe, but by the time it arrived I had already siliconed my water tube over the crack and ran it like that for years. If I DO end up needing to buy a new tube, then I might as well buy a 60w one since I've already got a 60w power supply...

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


I'm looking into building a small-ish cnc router soon, but ideally with enough rigidity to handle aluminum plate well. 24x24"-ish sort of capacity or maybe a little smaller. I'm looking at something derived from the openbuilds sphinx 55, maybe with linear rails instead of v-slot.

Maybe based on this, because being able to grab the plates off of eBay is a huge bonus.
https://openbuilds.com/builds/sphin...ear-rails.8790/
Is that as stiff as it looks to me? I'm trying to avoid the middle-ground of larger format CNC router that's best suited to wood/plastic to get my feet wet. I realize the move is probably just go buy a mill and do a CNC conversion, but I largely need to mill somewhat large flat plate rather than vice and fixture work.

It's hard to parse the range of "this $8000 cnc router is not stiff enough for aluminum" to "check out my MPCNC cutting aluminum" on the internet, so I'm sort of working on assumption here.

HolHorsejob
Mar 13, 2020

In the land of Hyrule, there echoes a legend. A legend held dearly by the Royal Family tells of a boy... A boy who, after battling evil and saving Hyrule, crept away from the land that made him a legend... Done with the battles he once waged across time, he embarked on a journey...


Hypnolobster posted:

I'm looking into building a small-ish cnc router soon, but ideally with enough rigidity to handle aluminum plate well. 24x24"-ish sort of capacity or maybe a little smaller. I'm looking at something derived from the openbuilds sphinx 55, maybe with linear rails instead of v-slot.

Maybe based on this, because being able to grab the plates off of eBay is a huge bonus.
https://openbuilds.com/builds/sphin...ear-rails.8790/
Is that as stiff as it looks to me? I'm trying to avoid the middle-ground of larger format CNC router that's best suited to wood/plastic to get my feet wet. I realize the move is probably just go buy a mill and do a CNC conversion, but I largely need to mill somewhat large flat plate rather than vice and fixture work.

It's hard to parse the range of "this $8000 cnc router is not stiff enough for aluminum" to "check out my MPCNC cutting aluminum" on the internet, so I'm sort of working on assumption here.

I'd be interested to see it if you succeed. I've cut a fair bit of aluminum on an othermill, but never a larger router. The table I did/kinda do have access to (arcpro 9600 plasma table w/ router kit) performed well on wood, but cutting aluminum on it sounds like a bad idea. Maybe I should give it a shot though, now that I have more time on my hands.

How do you avoid work hardening or burning up the tool/workpiece? A constant mist of isopropanol?

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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


With the right bits and correct feed/speed, it's totally doable, just down to mostly rigidity as far as I know. I'd be surprised to see even cheap bits burn up on aluminum, normally it's just chatter and then they break.

I've cut quite a bit of aluminum on my.. horizontal router I guess (overbuilt slot mortiser for woodworking). I didn't design it with that in mind but it's successfully done it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYc10ObHjP0

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