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Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


biracial bear for uncut posted:

You can use your last hole in one setup as your first alignment hole when moving setups. Maybe one program working off one edge datum, then the sequential programs basically calling X/Y zero the hole you locate off of in the subsequent setups.

As long as you don't loosen the vise bolts on the table you won't have to worry much about parallelism as you reset X on subsequent setups.

If you have some manual machining experience this should be easy to do, all you're doing is using the CNC controller to do a series of holes more rapidly than you can do it manually.

Thanks for the ideas. I thought about bolting an endstop rod smaller in diameter than the holes to the table to accomplish just this; the good news is as long as the holes are spaced measuring-tape accurate down the bar there really won't be any cost to being lazy, they really only need to be accurate in Y as illustrated.

Bad news is my G540 might have died in anticipation. No lights, redid the wires, checked multiple PSUs, replaced the fuse, measured the resistance across the r040, all of which check out, but nothing works. Gecko tech support blew my dick clean off: calling on a friday afternoon I had a dude walking me through probing components with a dmm over the phone within 2 minutes. It is now clear that god does not want me to have a working mill, but a positive tech support experience really lifted my spirits.

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Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


While I await the return of my G540, let's gently caress around:

I originally intended to make a heavy table base for the plasma but thinking about the design I wanted something I could tear down. This led me to consider simply making legs out of extrusion, but I already have steel so why not just make my own legs and braces?

3x2" 11ga legs with a bracket made of 3/32" into which I made four holes scribed with calipers that line up with the t-slots on the extrusion. I don't know how to weld but I've gotten far enough with this amazon stick welder that nothing's falling apart yet. Here's how big a 2x4"x72" extrusion with a single 36" leg is compared to a Shapeoko XXL.



The grinder hides most of my crimes:



Three more legs to go. Then feet. Then braces.

[edit] Two more. gently caress this is too big for my garage.

Ambihelical Hexnut fucked around with this message at 02:02 on May 23, 2020

shovelbum
Oct 21, 2010



Fallen Rib

Hows the shapeoko been? Getting much use out of it? I never ended up getting one, picked up a 3D printer instead and now I've gotten used to having the garage free for the actual car after cleaning it out.

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


I've gotten a ridiculous amount of use out of it; I pre-ordered in early 2015, upgraded to XXL in 2017, ran a small sign making business for a couple years with it, and have used it to make all kinds of plaques and engravings for my day job the entire time. This is in addition to things I do for myself and the family. These days it's a pretty mature product and works very well if you get dust collection and workholding sorted.

Everyone on the internet wants to pretend that it is also a mill, but it is not a mill. It's a gantry router for sheet stock.

shovelbum
Oct 21, 2010



Fallen Rib

Yeah I never got why people are so keen to try to use them for mills on metal etc when there are so many applications for the materials it can actually handle. The plasma seems like a good idea, it's a nice process that I haven't worked with since school and the simple plasma CNCs don't need to be as pricy as they are. I can't cut a straight line with a torch to save my life so I look forward to seeing your progress.

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008


Okay after another full day of this I have four legs and four supports. Size mockup:



a) I'm going to have to rearrange my garage when it comes time to assemble this thing.
b) If I make it a foot taller I can park the mower underneath. Probably shouldn't.



Support bars cut. The trusty harbor freight 4x6 bandsaw takes like 30 minutes per cut on this tubing. Each one support needs two 45 degree cuts, then a piece of flat bar cut out to make a bracket for the extrusion. Then you have 8 edges and 8 corners per support which need to be sanded and given a small bevel.

Then clamp it together on the table, tack one side, undo all the clamps, tack the other side, undo all the clamps, and start welding about an inch at a time alternating sides so it doesn't warp/etc. It goes much slower in real life than on youtube.

Bad welding:


Hide with grindy:


Then go back over it again because you can still see pits and low areas, then grind it again.

I'm extremely tired of drilling brackets by hand, can't wait for the stupid G540 to get back so I can just mill them.

Ambihelical Hexnut
Aug 5, 2008




Mocking it up. Need to add feet plates.

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

ask me about being the most obnoxious person of all time

Karia posted:

Rather than indicating in the hole every time you move, you can keep your drillbit down in the hole (plunged down past the flutes so the shank is in the hole), unclamp, and use the X axis to drag the bar over. You'll probably lose a thou or two every time because the hole's going to be slightly oversize, but maybe that's acceptable, and once you know that offset you can compensate for it if you want.

I was going to say this in my original post, but I know anybody with any industrial CNC machinist background would have a heart attack at the thought of using the positioning motors on a CNC to drag stock around (because they aren't designed with that in mind).

Also it's just bad practice in general, you can bend or otherwise break a tool if the stock is heavy enough.

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CarForumPoster
Jun 26, 2013


biracial bear for uncut posted:

I was going to say this in my original post, but I know anybody with any industrial CNC machinist background would have a heart attack at the thought of using the positioning motors on a CNC to drag stock around (because they aren't designed with that in mind).

Also it's just bad practice in general, you can bend or otherwise break a tool if the stock is heavy enough.

I have an industrial CNC machinist background, though I've been out of it for >5 years. There are many many examples of this done in industry and lots of tooling out there for it. Its almost certainly within the design limits of the pictured machine, but if theres any question, look up the specs.

That said, Karia's specific solution is likely not repeatable within a few thou as hoped. Drilling this in a vice is not likely to give the desired results, but tolerances weren't mentioned.

You can bang out a fixture plate for this hat will likely be better than what you want for a few bucks and maybe 1 hour of time. Move it by hand unless you gotta do a bunch of them. You can position the below orange piece as far apart as needed, just indicate them in on some machined square feature. Support the center.

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