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Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


sauer kraut posted:

Rolled over the cable of my cheap Panasonics once too often and I need some new headphones.
Did a few minutes of comparing and what I'm looking for seem to be Sennheiser HD 280 Pro's after I put in closed over-ear, detachable 3.5mm cable, sub 100€. Also heavy build for daily use.
If anyone could point me in the direction of a similar product where the ear muffler things are not made of faux leather but fabric mesh or something?, I'd be grateful 100 bucks stretching is my budget too, but oh well.

Cheers

e; also the 64Ohms impedance make me a bit nervous. Wouldn't 32 be more suited to hook to a standard mainboard 3.5mm output, no amp?

I run a 300 Ohm HD6XX off a motherboard without issue, and have run the DT770 80 Ohm off it as well. My phone (Pixel) runs them alright as well. Until you're dealing with higher end headphones which can be more power hungry, amps aren't strictly necessary. Unless your motherboard is poo poo you'll be fine.

Also look into these as they're better than anything else in your price range. There are multiple models of the DT770 Pro and they sound slightly different: The 32 Ohm are the shittiest since the driver wasn't originally designed to run at such low impedance, and the 80 Ohm are the most popular as they have a unique frequency response compared to the others, generally flatter with better extended bass and less fatiguing treble. Only real weaknesses is no detachable cable, and the cable they come with is long. Sturdy tho.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 02:15 on Aug 2, 2019

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Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


DancingShade posted:

I've still got a pair of Beyer 990s I bought a few years ago. Very comfy and sound great... for about 5 minutes then the treble starts murdering your ears and back into the box they go.

Who the gently caress listens to 990s apart from people with zero higher frequency response hearing?

Beyerdynamic headphones all have a treble spike, to varying degrees, which I assume is there to give the impression of increased detail. I primarily purchased the DT770 as a closed back headphone for games, but ultimately it wasn't good enough at fine detail to give accurate positional cues so I returned them. In terms of accuracy for binaural recordings and games, I actually find my Etymotics are perfect.

DT770 was still better than poo poo like my old Corsair headset tho

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Nerobro posted:

So.. I've got a weird one.

I can't get my headphones quiet enough. I like my hearing, I don't need them this loud. I could go down the rant path, where the engineers who do these things are just.. not understanding how audio works. But that's neither here nor there.

I want headphones, that are bluetooth, noise canceling, and can go quiet enough.

I currently use MPOW Wolverine earbuds, and MPOW M5 over the ear with noise cancelling.

Thanks everyone.

Suck it up about using a cable and get some Etymotics, they attenuate most sound better than ANC and allow you to listen at very low volumes while retaining excellent detail.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


codo27 posted:

Added the Fiio E10K to my amazon wishlist. Or is there something else I should be considering in that range? I've heard enough, I think I need a DAC for my desktop.

I've never used one, but having done a bunch of research on DACs/amps, it's the most recommended unit in its price range. This review of an E10K alongside two more expensive dedicated DACs has fairly extensive measurements, and in terms of audible sound the E10K DAC is perfectly good. If you have extremely power hungry headphones the internal amp may not be powerful enough, but otherwise should be perfectly suited to your needs.

redeyes posted:

I'm a big fan of this: https://www.amazon.com/EarStudio-ES...=gateway&sr=8-9

Pretty similar to the Fiio but maybe better sound quality. Also portable and is a bluetooth amp as well.

I own an ES100, it has both killed any desire to buy more Bluetooth headphones and convinced me to buy a DAC/amp for my desktop PC as the tiny little fucker somehow sounds better on my HD6XX than my expensive motherboard.

Highly recommend the ES100 if you want something mobile.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 15:25 on Aug 6, 2019

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


It's also a battery powered device, not really what OP was looking for.

But yea I'll be selling my one expensive pair of Bluetooth headphones in the near future because of it, the noise floor alone is a huge improvement.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Can't speak for others, but I only listen to streaming music. I can't be hosed downloading and organizing poo poo when Spotify has almost everything.

Also that FiiO costs more than an ES100 for mobile use off your phone plus a D30/Atom for the PC, combined.

I get the benefits of a DAP but they aren't for everyone.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Lowness 72 posted:

Is FLAC that much better than mp3 v0?

Good comprehension is transparent, even AAC needs a trained listener on good equipment to discern from lossless.

FLAC is for archiving, not listening.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


If you just want cheap durable and functional Bluetooth earphones I like Anker, their products tend to be very good for their price ranges

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I haven't heard them as they're impossible to find in my country, but the Cambridge Audio Melomania are true wireless and very well reviewed from what I've seen, and I believe they run around $100ish USD.

What makes them stand out at that price point is their support for both AAC and AptX codecs, meaning they'll sound good on either iOS or Android devices. If they're beyond your acceptable price range, look for alternatives that work with either AAC (iOS) or AptX (Android) codecs, as that will be the largest factor in sound quality.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I can't offer any specific options at your budget, but Sony and Audio Technica both make some good Bluetooth headphones in the $100-200 range.

They won't necessarily be audio nerd approved, but Skullcandy tend to be popular with normal people who've never heard of something so ridiculous as an amplifier for headphones.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I've only listened to the WH1000XM3 in a store but they were boomy and muddy sounding with too much exaggerated bass. I actually liked the H900 a lot more, though their ANC isn't quite as good.

If you like neutral tuning and Etys by all means try the XM3, but definitely try before you buy.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I have owned a pair of ATH-DSR7BT for a while now and am torn on whether I'd recommend them; they are significantly better tuned and more detailed than the Sony and Bose Bluetooth headphones I've listened to, but they suffer from a high noise floor resulting in an audible hiss when you have the volume turned up on quiet tracks such as classical or jazz. Aside from that hiss (And the lack of ANC) they sound much better than their competitors imo

Ultimately unless you need ANC a better solution to Bluetooth headphones is a Bluetooth DAC/amp that you can plug wired headphones into, such as the ES100 or BTR3K. Even the best wireless headphones are good for wireless headphones.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Nope, sorry

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


ChazTurbo posted:

I've been curious about the amirons. How do they sound?

https://youtu.be/bhSUJYDO0Qo

dudeís an engineer and respected, no woo

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 00:14 on Aug 18, 2019

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001



No

Zeos is a loving meme, never listen to him, dudes a hype generator

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


The only IEMs anyone needs are Etymotics tbh

They're better than ANC headphones as well

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


grack posted:

As long as you don't mind getting your ears violated, sure.

yea that's always the one caveat with Etys, I've never liked putting things in my ears and held off on IEMs for a long time because of it as well. After getting used to them however, I honestly find Etys much more comfortable and secure fitting than any other IEMs I've used; once you're used to them being in there they can basically disappear, especially if you're running the cables over-ear.

Sadly I haven't found anything else that comes close in terms of sound, and think I may prefer my ER4XR to my PM3 and HD600.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001



Wengy posted:

I've fallen into the headphone rabbit hole and am looking at the Audeze LCD-X and the Sony MDR-Z1R, halp. If I already have a fairly decent audio interface with a good DC (Audient id14), what exactly would be the point in shelling out 1.5k for something like the Sony TA-ZH1ES?

Also, a local store is offering a refurbished Sennheiser HD800 that was used as a store demo for 550 bucks, with six months of warranty, is that a good deal? Oh, and they have a refurbished LCD-X for 1.2k.

For just listening to headphones youíll never need more than a basic transparent DAC, which you can find for around $100; same goes for amps, one of the best measuring amps (JDS Atom) on the market costs a hundred bucks and will cleanly power any headphones on the market.

Expensive DACs and amps are basically woo.

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/master-index-of-audio-hardware-reviews.8184/

Also the LCD-X Creators edition, which is just the LCD-X without the extra balanced cable and huge carrying case, is $1.2k new on Audezeís site.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 15:38 on Sep 1, 2019

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Schwann posted:

Budget - $200 (can go a bit higher if necessary)
Source - MacBook Pro, iPhone XR
Isolation Requirements - Isolation necessary. I work in an office surrounded by my team. I would like to not hear them and they not hear my music.
Preferred Type of Headphone - Full size, circumaural. Wireless. Intended of use at office only.
Preferred Tonal Balance - Balanced. Not enough of an expert to say.
Past Headphones - Bought Sennheiser HD 558 four years ago. My first headphones. I use them for gaming and listening to music on my PC. Comfortably fit around my ears. I have been happy with them.
Preferred Music - Rhythmic low-key electronica mostly, classical music, podcasts

Used pair of Oppo PM3, check em out

E:

https://www.oppodigital.com/headphones-pm-3/

https://www.innerfidelity.com/content/oppo-pm-3-competent-comfortable-mobile-headphone

PM3 has a lovely case, flawless build quality, strong isolation, good comfort, can be driven by a phone, and the sound is flat with linear planar bass all the way down. There are basically two things keeping them from being perfect for what they are: Fuckers are discontinued and new in box are expensive as poo poo, and the treble could have more sparkle for my tastes.

They will poo poo on anything new that's the same price as what you can find used PM3s for on eBay.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 20:41 on Sep 9, 2019

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


KozmoNaut posted:

Just get a JDS Labs Atom.

This is the only realistic answer to what desktop headphone amp to buy

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Leavemywife posted:

Yeah, uh, I guess I should have been more specific in affordable.

Maybe in the $25 to $40 range? I'm not really sure what I'm looking for here. I might be in the wrong place.

oh god i'm gonna be laughed outta here

I've never personally used them, but these are pretty well regarded for their price; at that price range the best sounding earphones you'll find are IEMs.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I'd avoid the DT770's these days, the K371 basically murders them from every angle, most importantly in sound; the K371 are tuned very near the current Harman target, and don't have the lovely treble of the Beyerdynamics. Having owned both, the DT770 pads are garbage and wear out way too quickly, impacting the sound, they're made of steel and recycled milk jug plastic so they'll last forever but the actual build quality is terrible and they feel rough as hell, and they have a non-detachable ten-foot cable. The DT770 is not a great headphone, they've always been tonally off and fatiguing to listen to, there just never used to be much better in the price range.

Look up the K371, they're more comfortable, sound better, are built better, fold up, are efficient enough to be driven by mobile sources, and come with three detachable cables. At $150 they've removed any reason to look at old units like the DT770 and M50X which were always overrated by virtue of being cross-shopped against Beats.

I don't want to oversell the K371, they're still a $150 pair of headphones, but in that price bracket I've not heard, or heard of, anything better. In terms of frequency response they don't do anything "wrong" or offensive, and have that ridiculous sub-bass rumble people like in the DT770.

Check em out imo

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

I feel like this needs an asterisk* because my HE4xx are "35ohms" but they definitely need a nuclear powerplant to produce impressive sound.

It's because while they have a low resistance they also have a low sensitivity: 93 dB

When determining power requirements for headphones the sensitivity is much more important than the resistance, as a less sensitive headphone will require more current to adequately power. Most headphones with a 100+ dB sensitivity should play to acceptable volumes through mobile sources.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 17:00 on May 17, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


I'm actually not a Harman superfan and didn't keep the K371 I had purchased, but if you look at raw measurements the K371 has a much more even and closer to neutral frequency response. In terms of actual detail, the K371 is quite good as well. I mentioned the Harman target specifically because it's an amalgamation of preference which is, by design, going to sound pretty good to a majority of people, making it a decent baseline recommendation.

Ignoring frequency response, the remainder of it stands as well: The K371 is compact, comfortable, folds up for portable use, comes with three detachable cables for different use cases, and is a modern professional studio monitoring headphone engineered by a company at the forefront of research in this industry right now. The DT770 80 Ohm as a portable option is a loving joke.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


You're looking for Etymotics, they sit deep like earplugs and so isolate 35-42 dB depending on depth and tip choice. They also sound better than anything in the same price range; Etymotic invented IEMs in 1991 and basically solved them at the same time, their basic designs have only been refined since then and they're still top-tier IEMs. You're spending kilobucks to seriously outperform them in detail retrieval and tuning.

Their deep fit feels weird as hell at first and takes a little time to get used to, but if you can get used to the deep fit they're more comfortable and stable fitting than any other IEM I've used for long-term wear. I've owned the ER3, ER4, and earlier discontinued lines of Etymotics, they're all great with very flat even tuning. You can find pictures of heads of state and ambassadors wearing Etymotics at conferences and such as they're used professionally for their isolation and clarity in scenarios where translation is necessary etc.

Personal preference is a bitch, but your own tastes aside, Etymotic IEMs are exactly what you need for your use case.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 15:54 on May 22, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


fanfic insert posted:

Those actually seem great, shame the ones you linked aren't bluetooth and those that are are crazy expensive. But I can live with a cable I guess since most the other boxes are ticked.

The non bluetooth ones going to be at the least 180 inc shipping/tax so I'm going to grovel some to my boss maybe they'll pay for (some of) it.

Thanks a lot!

Whichever model you end up going with, the fit and seal are extremely important with Etymotics, so try the different size tips and be mindful that they seal like earplugs so you don't want to just yank them out. Have an extremely dorky video

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 02:33 on May 23, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


El Grillo posted:

Anyone got any brand recommendations - I'm looking for decent quality/mid-range (£50-£100) wireless IEMs, preferably ones with silicon ear lock pieces (like the 'sport'-type IEMs tend to have, to keep them in your ears).

I see some stuff by Jabra out there, are they usually not poo poo?

I honestly find buying wireless IEMs a complete pain in the arse. Never seem to be any good mid-range options, only cheap poo poo or really expensive ones which still often have bad QA issues or just feature flaws (4 hour battery life etc).. hoping someone here can point me in the right direction this time!

They're a little above your budget range, but the original Samsung Galaxy Buds sound excellent, they're one of the best true-wireless IEMs on the market.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Klipsch and Vmoda IEMs are poo poo as are most Shures including the 215, look into Moondrop Starfield or Etymotic ER2XR.

For closed headphone guy, look into the AKG K371, it's the best-tuned and generally best closed-back headphone you can find for under several hundred dollars and is an upgrade over the old DT770 in basically every way.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


ddogflex posted:

iSine 10 can be had around that price now and you won't get anywhere close to the sound quality with anything else. They're weird though, open-back IEM.

Do a lot of reading before buying any Audeze IEMs, and get them from a place with returns if you can't audition them first, they're all tuned with absolutely horrid wonky hosed up frequency responses and require fixing via EQ, I don't think I've seen a positive review of their un-EQ'd sound. Apparently the babby planar drivers can sound spectacular if you are willing to futz with the EQ tho


FilthyImp posted:

I noticed Monoprice had some wireless earbuds that were pretty well specced (stereo blutooth 5 etc).

Are... are they lovely?

Monoprice is almost all poo poo in general, but look up reviews of the specific model. This list has some good options in the ~$50-60 range assuming those were the Massdrops you were looking at.

When it comes to audio quality, Bluetooth version doesn't mean much as the newer revisions mostly upgrade other features of the codec, like connection strength and range, so while a newer device with Bluetooth 5 is technically preferable over an older version it doesn't really matter in this use case; what will make a difference is earphones which use AAC or aptX codecs, which are superior audio codecs to the standard Bluetooth codec, so all else being equal an earphone with Bluetooth 4 and AAC will sound better than the same earphone with Bluetooth 5 running the base Bluetooth audio codec. Most good Android phones should support AAC and aptX, while iPhones only do AAC.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 00:11 on May 26, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Take the plunge! Okay! posted:

Thanks guys, looks like I'm SOL because nobody will ship Moondrop or Etymotic to my country from within the EU, and iSines are $450 where I live.

Well ShenzenAudio ships free globally: https://shenzhenaudio.com/products/moondrop-starfield-carbon-nanotube-diaphragm-dynamic-earphone

Of course, check out reviews etc before blind buying anything.

As for wireless IEMs, Samsung Galaxy Buds, the first ones, sound great and are relatively cheap compared against their competition, and seal properly unlike Airpods.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Fingat posted:

I got the K361's and unfortunately I'm going to return them and the 371's wont fix it. The headband creates a pressure point right on the top of my head and gives me a headache. I tried bigger ear pads to see if it changed it but it didnt. But also the sound isn't quite what I like either, I'm looking for a bit more bass I think.

lovely deal, but good example of why to always buy from shops that allow returns. You have a good reference point now as well, to compare impressions of other sound signatures against. Sorry they didn't work out!

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Fingat posted:

I'm looking for closed back though. I moved away from the open back Senn's I had to get some more isolation, and not bother my wife. After looking around I feel like I should just say gently caress it and get the hd58x's

Have you ever tried IEMs?

They're what killed closed-back headphones, and largely full-size headphones in general, for me once I got used to putting them in since you can get better sound quality for the money and they resolve comfort issues of headbands.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


sounds like a good case for saying gently caress it and getting the 58X; in addition the 58X uses the same headband and cushioning as the 6XX, and I can speak from experience as someone who doesn't like the comfort of most headphones--I didn't keep the K371 despite respecting it--that the headband on the Sennheisers is extremely comfy with no pressure on the top of the head thanks to the divot in the foam.

from the 58x the upgrade path is basically HD6XX for an extra $50, and from there anything meaningfully better costs a lot more

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 23:00 on May 27, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Fingat posted:

What are the thoughts on the SHP9500?

Never personally heard them but the 58X are a much higher-end product, the SHP9500 gets hype at $50 because $50, not because great.

I've gone down the cheap hype rabbit hole before and unless you're on a limited budget just step up to the $100+ price range and get something good the first time.

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 05:00 on May 28, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Never buy a Beyerdynamic without a return policy, they get hype from people who haven't heard a lot of headphones and tend to be horribly overrated; their commonly recommended headphones are mostly their monitoring headphones, which all have varying degrees of hosed up treble spikes and a wonky tonality.

If part of what you didn't like about the K361 sound was that it sounded thin or hollow that's due to the tuning, the K361 has a sort of v-shaped tuning and you can see the mids are sort of scooped out; when looking at frequency response you can't tell exactly how something will sound, but it's a decent rough guideline, and what you want to look at is the raw frequency measurement on the left generally. By contrast, your HD555 have the typical Sennheiser tuning of nicely neutral mid-range with substantial bass roll-off, you can see that the bass just sort of falls off as it decends lower in frequency, which is the one real complaint I and most other people have with this tuning. If you did decide to try out Beyerdynamics, I'd avoid the DT770 as it sounds hosed up and is super fatiguing to listen to, while the DT880 is the closest to a neutral tune. Realistically since you already know you like the tuning of Sennheisers, the HD58X is basically a direct upgrade from what you have now which will retain the same general sound signature with a bit better bass and more clarity in sound; the HD6XX is another little step up from there in terms of sound detail and quality with again pretty similar tuning.

Frequency response graphs can't tell you what a headphone necessarily sounds like in total, but they can be useful for comparing two headphones assuming you are looking at measurements taken on the same rig.

tldr if you don't want to keep playing return roulette just get the Sennheisers

Wheeee fucked around with this message at 16:18 on May 28, 2020

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


The DT770 is a studio monitor, they're used for tracking and being able to identify recording issues, hence the treble spikes since that exposes a lot of issues and is what people confuse for "detail" in the sound; they're relatively cheap, sound okay, and are made of steel and recycled milk jug plastic so they last forever unless the brittle plastic bits holding the yokes to the cups breaks, so yea they've got a long history of popularity in that context.

For someone looking to buy some headphones for listening to music, they aren't terrible or anything and were recommended for so long because most closed-back headphones are just straight trash, but they are not tuned well nor are they technically particularly capable. The consensus opinion pimping the DT770 comes from people with relatively little experience for whom the DT770 represents the highest end poo poo they've heard or from people using them as actual studio monitors for whom the finer details of tuning don't actually matter, they are not well regarded in most headphone communities beyond being a decent budget pick, and with the advent of the K361/K371 there isn't much reason to consider the Beyerdynamics anymore unless there's comfort issues with the AKG being smaller and tighter.

I'm not posting this because I hate Beyerdynamics, I think they're fine, just fine, but as is typical on SA this is a very old thread and so ends up cycling the same advice over and over just because it's become the conventional wisdom. It's funny you mention the 880 not being regarded as the stars of the line by anyone when the long-running consensus among people with more experience tends to be the opposite, that the 880 is the closest one to actually being good.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


DancingShade posted:

Show us on the dolly where the DT990 treble spike touched you.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


There are very few on-ear headphones and even fewer that aren't poo poo.

Maybe try find some Sennheiser Momentum on-ears, they're discontinued but can be found around ~$100-120 online still and are some of the best-built headphones I've ever owned or seen, rivaling my Oppo PM-3.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


thepopmonster posted:

Based on a couple of review scans, it looks like the Momentum 2.0 were slightly more portable (swivel-flat) and slightly less good? Does that sound right?

Not sure, only ever heard the originals, but sounds about right from what I recall reading.

I'm not a fan of the originals due to them being on-ear, which irritates my ears, and I'm not fond of their tuning though the actual sound quality is good, but aside from those subjective issues they are spectacularly well made and feel amazing, and the original white ones are just gorgeous. Sonically not my jam, but design-wise some of my favourite headphones ever.

I'd forgotten I even owned them until reading that post and trying to think of anything that even comes close to that incredible list of requirements tbh

ddogflex posted:

I really doubt the sound bar sends audio over Bluetooth. Itís surely a receiver.

Yea I'd double check that, it's common for them to act as receivers but not as transmitters.

Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Dogen posted:

I've looked at getting Dekoni pads and I read some (??audiophile talk??) that actually the pads that come with the 650/6xx affect the quality of the sound at that most aftermarket pads make them sound worse which seems kinda hard to believe?? Also yeah honestly the stock pads are comfy enough for me after living with them for 6ish months.

Pads actually make a lot of difference to headphone sound, and almost always getting aftermarket pads will make headphones sound worse as it'll either strip away much of the bass or add a bunch of bass bloat, depending on the pads you switched from/to; there are exceptions, the Sennheisers are not among them.

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Wheeee
Mar 11, 2001


Dogen posted:

Interesting. Thanks everyone for the comments, I just have a natural skepticism of claims about these things that I think is understandable, but I guess it makes sense that density of material/seal to noggin/changing driver position relative to earhole could make a difference. Glad I'm happy with the stock pads.

Yea a lot of what makes a headphone sound a certain way has nothing to do with the driver itself, rather the distance and angle of the driver, seal and positioning around the ear, material properties of not only the pads but the backing materials, etc. Headphone drivers, at least dynamic drivers, cost somewhere between a few cents and a few dollars to make, poo poo's cheap. What makes cheap/bad headphones sound bad isn't necessarily that it's expensive material-wise to make a good sounding headphone, but that it's difficult to design and tune one that sounds good.

You should in general be extremely skeptical about anything relating to audio tho, it's a good mindset

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