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Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





Why do you think there's a difference? What is the new DAC doing that your old DAC wasn't doing?

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Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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cat doter posted:

Seems those cost around $130 here in Australia, so I can actually afford something better. What about the ATH M50x? They seem affordable and people like them, but I dunno about their frequency response for my needs.

The studio standard for what you're describing is typically the beyerdynamic dt770 (if you desperately want to spend more than just buying 7506's for some reason). In fact, in my brief stint in audio engineering I don't think I've ever been in a recording studio that had anything other than DT770's for drummers and 7506's for everyone else.

The 7506 is a better can than the M50x for studio monitoring. It's far more commonplace and honest, so your mixes tend to translate better. They don't sound very exciting, but that's not really the point.

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 21:18 on Oct 30, 2015

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





cat doter posted:

My main concerns beyond how they sound (which, like you said, how exciting they sound isn't important, I just want better headphones for mixing) are comfort and isolation, so if the 7506s are great for that then I'll grab them. I find the isolation on my 280pros to be kinda middling and they're kinda bad for mixing, that and their clamping force can cause me pain since I'm wearing glasses and it forces the arms into my head a bit too hard. Ergonomics are a big concern for me. I'll get whatever I can wear for a long time and mix with without wanting to smash my headphones.

Dt770's are probably the most comfortable closed headphones I've tried. They get a bit sweaty, but that's going to happen with closed cans no matter what. I've worn 7506's all day every day for weeks at a time for video shoots, they're extremely comfortable until the pads wear out which takes about a year and a half. Then you order new ones for 10 bucks and you're all set.

I would get the 7506 and save whatever money you have toward a pair of good, biamped nearfield monitors if you don't already own some. I've always found it much quicker to mix for speakers first, then tweak for headphone users afterward.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Incredulous Dylan posted:

I wanted more portability and the ability to reliably achieve 24/192KHz playback, since my current optical connection was not able to break 96KHz. If I'm going to own a $1,500 pair of headphones, I might as well try both flavors and see what I like, don't you think?

Wait a sec, why would you need 192khz on playback? Where are you getting music that was even recorded with that resolution, let alone presented at it?

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Incredulous Dylan posted:

If you are interested in the technical measurements of the new Bifrost, btw, feel free to check out this thread. Someone has taken the time to measure the sort of stuff I have no background in reasonably understanding. If you would like direct measurements as opposed to nebulous opinions on audio quality, you'll find them there.

I don't even know why I'm engaging with this, but why does any of this matter on playback?

I can understand going with R2R over sigma-delta when recording music. You want as much resolution and dynamic range as possible because you can make much more detailed and minute choices when processing and mixing. But no matter how meticulous your signal path and expensive your processing equipment, every track is getting mangled and re-quantized a million times before it ends up a mastered downmix for the listener. Even if that's a pristine 24/96 FLAC straight from the analog golden master, encoded with an ADC made from angel's tears and the menstrual blood of the Virgin Mary.

Spend your money however you want but as someone with experience actually producing music I promise you you're fooling yourself.

edit: also just to be clear when I say resolution I don't mean audio spectrum outside the range of human hearing, I really just mean dynamic range without distortion. You can't hear past 20khz. There aren't "harmonics" and "air" that you're missing with 44.1khz audio. Ultrasonic intermodulation isn't magical, musical fairy dust that the truly special golden ears can enjoy, it's distorted garbage that needs to be filtered out.

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 00:43 on Oct 31, 2015

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





Incredulous Dylan posted:

If it comes with my USB connection I've paid for, why not use the benefits? I'm an amateur musician/podcaster who does in fact record and master audio. My main vocal condensor microphone (Blue Yeti Pro) records in 24/192 and I compose with my synthesizer workstation and various other instruments. I appreciate you deigning to engage with my impressions and the different perspective you've provided. If it's the Schiit "comboburrito" digital filter resulting in the changes I have heard versus the multibit, I'm welcoming the change either way.

Because there are literally no audible benefits. I promise you, you can't tell a difference if you do a double blind test. The only possible change to the actual audio in any of the components you're describing would be to noise floor, and those differences happen at under 100db under full scale. There's no possible way changing sampling rate, bit rate or whatever that filter does could affect stereo separation or "soundstage".

My perspective isn't a perspective, it's reproducible science.

edit: here i found a video of a smug neckbeard explaining all of this: http://xiph.org/video/vid2.shtml

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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pretty much the only thing that has mattered in terms of what audio sounds like in the last 20 years is physical speaker and headphone design. everything else is either so far into diminishing returns territory as to be pointless, or just made up audiophile nonsense.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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you can like, feel the musicians in the room, man.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Cubemario posted:

Aside from USB mics in general being pretty poo poo-tier and lacking in features, recording virtually any source (especially vocals) beyond 16-bit and 44.1khz is overkill and doesn't really do anything under any circumstances I'm aware of. Especially when dealing with vocals, you should be doing very little processing to begin with, if you're doing it right.

I don't agree with either of these points. The Blue Yeti, first of all, is a surprisingly great mic and is perfectly fine if it flatters your voice. Second, I was working as an engineer when 24 bit equipment started to come out and it was a god drat revolution. Getting tracking levels right on digital gear is a mighty pain in the rear end. When you've got six bands a day coming through, banging out demos, you don't have time to make sure you're getting the perfect dynamic range on every vocal take. You either turn it down or throw a limiter on there, and neither of those options are very good.

Tracking with 24 bits gives you enough headroom that you don't have to worry as much about clipping, and you can still normalize it later without bringing up the noise floor too much and having to gate it out. That's HUGE.

Also, 96k files can sometimes help aliasing distortion from digital post processing. If you're running stuff through a plugin or processor that doesn't oversample internally or have a decent filtering algorithm, 96k can fix some issues for you. That said, just about everything does these days so it's mostly pointless. Also, you can get the same effect by converting the file after tracking anyway.

The point of all this is: 24 bit is amazingly useful for recording professionals. 96k used to be somewhat helpful because plugins used to be crappier, now it's largely pointless. And none of this matters one iota on playback.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Sennheiser G3 systems are absolutely great if you have a grand to spend for a stage wireless setup.

If you mean like consumer bluetooth models then yeah no. I doubt there ever will be unless someone can make a decent audio codec stick, SBC is really bad even when implemented well (it is never implemented well). Too bad aptX never caught on.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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If you didn't need active noise cancellation, this would be a lot easier. The Zik is pretty much your only option other than the Sennheiser Momentum which is $50 over your budget.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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I have a pair of Harmon Kardon BT that sound great and tick every other box of yours.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Chimp_On_Stilts posted:

Great suggestion, those get excellent reviews and appear to hit all my needs.

I am now looking between the Zik, Momentum, and 'Plantronics Backbeat Pro' wireless.

If I had $500, your requirements and liked the Sennheiser sound, I would definitely get the Momentum. I've only tried them in a store so I can't say much about the sound quality, but they're quite comfy and well built.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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HenryJLittlefinger posted:

I need a new set of IEMs that are super low profile and really noise-isolating for under my motorcycle helmet. My helmet is pretty snug and my ears stick out a little I guess, because all the ones I've used so far end up causing a good bit of fatigue after an hour or two.
Budget is about $40.

I use Meelectronics Sport-Fi M6 to sleep with, they are practically zero profile and come with a ton of tips. I sleep on my side and they're the only IEMs I've tried that I don't notice against the pillow. They don't sound great, but the build quality is very good for the $10.50 they cost.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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The third ring is for the microphone. Normal TRS will give you stereo, but the mic won't work.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





Hey so my Brainwavz M5s just died. I liked them well enough, though I found them rather dark and mid bass oriented. I would like better mid and treble clarity on whatever I replace them with.

I use my good ol' 7506s for my video and sound mix work but I prefer my cheapo Superlux HD668B for movies and games.

I have some MEE M6 Sports that I hate, the mids are a cluttered, distorted mess.

Given all that, what IEMs should I buy? Don't really want to spend more than 60 bucks unless they'll survive in a soft leather pouch in my back pocket for more than 6 months.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Drunk Badger posted:

Yeah, not enough travel to need expensive IEMs. Any nice cheap ones?

KZ ATE are amazing: https://www.amazon.com/KZ-Earphone-Headphones-Running-Microphone/dp/B00Y0F6IBG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1468976454&sr=8-1&keywords=kz+ate

but ditch the lovely foam eartips they give you, get some comply if you like that sort of thing. $14 and the best i've listened to under around $80 if you like the over the ear style. Cons are they're fairly big, and I find they're pretty assertive from 60 to 150hz or so. The response is fast though, so it's not bad bass at all and it doesn't muddy up the mids, there's just a lot of it.

I got a pair of Brainwavz S0 recently that are pretty great, decently flat and remarkably well built. A good deal for the $18 I spent on Prime Day, but I dunno about the $44 they normally ask for them.

I've heard great things about the Rock Zircons: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B016ISVZ7O/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1WRDNWO5ZTILH but haven't checked 'em out yet.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





the ATE are no good for running or gym stuff, unfortunately. They have a clever thing where there are weights on the cables instead of a memory wire which I find very comfortable, but the downside is that they bounce loudly on your neck while you jog.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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MarcusSA posted:

Lol but they specifically say they are for running ha!

sure, they also "have a better sound quality of people" and "Feel comfortable wearing with the ergonomics designed headphone"

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Non Serviam posted:


I don't want to go above 50 bucks since, as I said, I have good quality stuff at home. I don't need any special bells and whistles, just a pair that will allow me to make calls without music sounding like a 96kbps mp3 encoded in the Napster era. Of course, if you think that this is just too low, I'm happy to know what you suggest.

Thanks for your help!

Edit. Just in case... I'm talking in-ear headphones.

There are plenty of amazing chinese IEMs that punch way above their weight, but it's also a very crowded market and there's a ton of garbage. I recommend:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B016ISVZ7O/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

These are very light, the cables can be worn down or up, and they're reasonably sturdy. My current favorite "throw in the back pocket, take everywhere and don't worry about it" set. They're extremely "fun" sounding, i.e. a V shaped profile that's very bad for reference / mixing, very good for rocking out. Unlike most sets in this price range, they actually sound great. The mids aren't too recessed, low, focused, non-farty bass response, decently present treble without a ton of sibilance.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00Y0F6IBG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Similarly "Fun" sounding, cables worn up only, rather large but I find them comfortable. Mids are less recessed, I would call these more honest than the Rock pair, but not by much. The little mic doohickey is less robust than the first pair, but other than that they're absurdly well built for a 14 buck pair of headphones.

https://www.amazon.com/Brainwavz-Is...XN169M9HDZM8YAB

Complete opposite sound signature as the above two, these are very flat for cheap IEMs. They actually sound reasonably close to my beat up old pair of 7506s, so I find them a somewhat useful mix tool for on-the-go video editing and whatnot when I don't want to lug a set of cans. Very sturdy, flat cables that don't tangle much and the only remote I've ever found that will do volume control on both android and iphone. At least on the Nexus 6 and LG G4. I think they claim you can wear the cables up on these, but I find that ultra annoying due to the flat cables. These also come with a very nice case and a very nice assortment of tips, including Comply foam.

If you want a step up from these, you pretty much have to jump into the $100+ category with something like the Shure SE215 or VSonic GR07.

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 18:34 on Jul 25, 2016

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





treiz01 posted:

Okay, so I looked around and I found the name of the best headphones I ever had: Sony MDR-V900 (not HD)

They were in a word, magical. I was never without these headphones, and I would sit with my eyes closed and focus on each layer, each separate instrument. Because I could. Is there anything comparable to these? For headphones of these quality I would pay $500 without question.

The Oppo PM3 are closed, circumaural, easy to drive and will sound WAY, WAY, WAY better than your V900s ever did.

Although, if I were primarily listening at home I would spend about the same money on a pair of HD600's and a Schiit Magni instead.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Or rather, if you haven't owned a nice pair of headphones in a long while, dip your toes in the water and grab some Superlux 668B's because they cost 38 american dollars and are loving fantastic. I enjoy mine about as much as I do any of the other headphones I own regardless of price.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





Don't put them in your pocket without a pouch of some kind.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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treiz01 posted:

Any reason for these ones in particular? They look pretty fabulous, but are they nearly $600 CAD fabulous?

The Oppo because, like your long lost V600's, they're closed cans and therefore you can take them anywhere without disturbing those around you. They're also easy to drive with sources like phones and laptops, so you don't need an amp.

The HD600 (with a decent amp) because they're pretty much the de facto pinnacle of where most people should stop loving with a home headphone rig. If you have HD600 and a decent amp, you're just not likely to get much better headphones without starting to veer into the Audeze / Denon / Ultrasone territory and that way lies diminishing returns and an empty wallet. They're open backed, so not really portable unless you bring an amp with you and enjoy angering people standing next to you.

You don't have to spend that much money if you don't want though. The Superlux I mentioned are fantastic, the Philips SHP9500 are fantastic, honestly the good old MDR7506 are fantastic.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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rath posted:

I'm looking for suggestions for a new pair of headphones to use on my PC. I'm currently using a pair of Audio Technica AD900s with a Fiio E10 DAC. I'm pretty happy with the headset in general, but the driver touches my ears and causes a lot of pain after wearing for a couple of hours.

you don't need new headphones, you need new pads.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Thick-Velou...j-s1zoC6CpVjGwA

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Is there something other than a headset you'd rather spend the money on?

Honestly, a set of Philips SHP-9500s and a Vmoda BoomPro will be a million times better than any of those things and still come in around a hundred bucks. You could redeem the credit and sell what you use it for, I guess?

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





incidentally, the superlux 668bs also make extremely good gaming heaphones due to their crazy bonkers humongous soundstage. Only downsides are that you'd need a 3.5mm barrel connector and maybe some tape to be able to use a BoomPro or equivalent, the stock pads are horrible and they're somewhere between very and unbearably ugly to look at. All fixable issues except the last one.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT





I'm actually right now wearing some vintage, pre-MK2 T20RP's that I rescued from the trash at an old studio I used to work in. They were beat to gently caress, I had to rewire them, replace the jack and the pads and resolder everything, but they sound pretty fuckballs amazing. I've considered modding them as the frequency response isn't consistent between the two drivers, but I'm lazy and they sound pretty great as is. I completely get why people have started whole businesses selling modified versions of the Mk2.

They are also really loving hard to drive. My 13" retina MBP can just barely run them with everything maxed, but forget using them with a phone. I'm lucky enough to own an old Yamaha A100a which has a headphone stage that could electrocute an elephant, and I still have to run it hotter than any other cans I own (11 o'clock on the pot. lol.) No idea about the O2, but worth a shot?

I hear the T50RP mk3's are actually great stock except for the pads, but that's why god made Brainwavz. I have a pair that should show up tomorrow so I'll check back in and let you know how they sound.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Paul MaudDib posted:

How are the K7XX for gaming? I am currently driving a pair with an O2/ODAC. I'm pretty happy overall, but in some of those "3d audio" things I can't tell front-versus-back particularly well - which makes sense in terms of the physics of there not actually being a driver there, but if there's room to move up in terms of game precision then I'm listening.

Good headphones with fast drivers and lots of treble are what you need for gaming. The el-cheapo answer is Superlux 668b, the more expensive answer is the Audio Technica AD series. Avoid gaming headsets, they are all garbage.

Incidentally, if someone tries to sell you a "7.1 surround headset with multiple drivers" etc etc just punch them in the face, it's marketing horseshit. The only way to get 3d audio is with an actual 5.1 or 7.1 speaker setup, period.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Dr. Fishopolis posted:

I hear the T50RP mk3's are actually great stock except for the pads, but that's why god made Brainwavz. I have a pair that should show up tomorrow so I'll check back in and let you know how they sound.

They showed up. Hot diggity. Here's my snap judgement after a couple hours listening.

Pretty loving amazing for the $120 I spent on a used set.

The good:

They sound amazing with the stock pads. A. Ma. Zing.
Tight, deep bass extension. Less bass than my t20s, but even faster and flatter across the spectrum.
The high end is not particularly forward or bright, but it's there and sparkly and accurate. Warmish, but not quite Sennheiser warm. Definitely not Grados.
Mid focused, but my god the detail. I haven't heard dynamic cans that can do this.
A sine sweep shows no significant audible variance between the drivers. Hits its stride at 100hz. Little hump at 900hz, dip at 8k, starts rolling off audibly at 12k (though my hearing rolls off at 13 so if you're younger ymmv). Smooth as heck.


The bad:

The stock pads are horrrrrribly uncomfortable and hot. I tried some Brainwavz hybrid velour pads, but they put the drivers too far away and the bass disappears. I've ordered some fancy Shure pads because I hear they're ideal for these cans and I like them more than enough to splurge out another 40 for fancy pads. Besides, nothing this cheap should sound this good.
Headband sort of sucks. It's a shitload better than the mk2's but I splurged another 12 bucks on an HD600 style set of foam lumps.
The included cables are a bit wank. You get a short, bright orange bit of rubbery wank, or a way-too-long black bit of rubbery wank. Thankfully I had a Vmoda cable lying around that's much better.
Still hard to drive, but at least a tad easier than the t20s.

For the 150 or so they ask for these, they are ludicrously worth it. If you already have a beefy headphone amp and are willing to splurge on some quality of life improvements, I can't think of a better deal in this price range. If you don't have a beefy amp, well it's still probably worth it. Spend 150 on the cans, another 50 or so on pads and a headband upgrade, plus a hundred bucks on a nice amp. Now you own a set of planars that sound better than the Oppo PM-3 and compete with the Hifiman HE400, and you spent $100 bucks less than either of those sets. And you have a nice new headphone amp.

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 20:06 on Jul 30, 2016

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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GobiasIndustries posted:

Any chance someone has an answer for this? I don't know if this an industry thing or if I just got lucky to have a headset with a replaceable cord.

This one's cheaper and a much more reasonable length: https://www.amazon.com/Bestcompu%C2...rds=hd212+cable

If you're at all handy with a soldering iron I'd make my own. That's sort of a dick of a cable, I don't think I've seen a 3.5mm stereo to dual 2.5mm mono before. Standard parts but a weird configuration. Almost all good headphones have replaceable cables, but some manufacturers get weird with the connectors for some stupid reason.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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plape tickler posted:

These showed up today and I'm really liking them. Thanks for the recommendation.

Hooray!

My only issue with them is I find the stock pads a bit sweaty. If you want to really treat yourself, I've found the Brainwavz HM5 hybrids to be the perfect solution for that. https://www.amazon.com/Brainwavz-Hybrid-Memory-Foam-Earpad/dp/B00ZGGG3KY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470177581&sr=8-1&keywords=brainwavz+hybrid

Of course, they cost almost as much as the headphones themselves, so if you want something more reasonable, these are entirely worth the 7 bucks: http://www.ebay.com/itm/A-Pair-of-V...ZQAAOSwYHxWMYGF

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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HEADPHONE ALERT SPEND MONEY ON poo poo

I'm late on this but the shp9500 are in stock at Newegg for 58 dollars. They are discontinued and increasingly hard to find south of $75. If you need or want an open set of headphones go buy them right now.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16826138190

go go go

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 01:16 on Aug 3, 2016

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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MarcusSA posted:

I just ordered a pair of Superlux 668B's would the SHP9500's be better?

EDIT: Eh gently caress it $100 bucks for 2 pair of headphones is not much. So I just bought both.

The 668 has wider soundstage, is very very bright and semi-open, so leaks much less sound. It is extremely ugly, but sounds amazing for the price and is maybe marginally better for gaming. It's quite comfortable if you get along with the flappy paddle headband, though switching the pads to at least those cheapo velours is a really good idea as the pads are a weak point.

The Philips is maybe a little more boringly accurate than the Superlux, but sounds considerably more refined. Extremely open, meaning the whole room will hear the bukkake porn you're listening to. The headband and pads are finished with a weird sort of office chair upholstery kind of fabric. At first, you'll think "this won't be comfortable" but it is, in fact, extremely comfortable. Absurdly comfortable.

I own both because hey why not they're cheap. The SHP is probably my favorite dynamic headphone. It does not sound as detailed as an HD600, but I do think it sounds a bit more balanced and honest than the 598. It's not as grandiose as the Fidelio X2, but it also costs 60 bucks. And it's just so loving comfortable.

If I had to lose one, it would definitely be the Superlux, but I still like it and break it out to game with from time to time.

Dr. Fishopolis fucked around with this message at 07:42 on Aug 3, 2016

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Melraidin posted:

Ordered Fostex T50RP Mk III for fun. Hoping they'll not leak too much sound to be used at work. Source will be an Apple laptop and I won't be moving around with the headphones. Wondering if I need an amp? I should be able to try with and without, using either a Fiio E10k or my CMOY. If one is worthwhile can you make some recommendations under 200 $? Schiit's stuff is somewhat tempting, though as soon as I look there I'm tempted to get a DAC as well. Other reasonable options?

I can just about eke out an acceptable volume with mine if I crank my macbook up to max, but yeah you really do need an amp.

I've been thinking about getting an Origen+ since my cheapo behringer DAC is crapping out and it would be nice to have an amp I can take places. lots of good reviews. It looks like it would do you fine, let me know how it is if you get it: https://www.amazon.com/Micca-OriGen-High-Resolution-Preamplifier/dp/B01BURJVOC

Incidentally, you should know that you neeeeeeeeed to replace the pads. Friends don't let friends use the T50 with the stock pads. Get Shure 850 pads for 12 bucks: https://www.amazon.com/Shure-HPAEC840-Replacement-Cushions-Headphones/dp/B002Z9JWZS

or get the 1540 pads if you want to spend 40 dollars on ultrasuede headphone pads that feel like you've strapped the memory foam headcushions from a mercedes c-class to the sides of your head.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Paul MaudDib posted:

Even if they hit an acceptable volume there's no way that a laptop will be pushing enough power to make them sound good.

Can you explain the physics behind this? I've always heard tell that if you have to push the knob past 3 o'clock, you need a more powerful amp, but damned if I can tell the difference in an A/B test.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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Krinkle posted:

I looked at a bunch of Sennheisers but then went on the advice of a guy I barely know to get audio technica M50x. Though he said M50s. They were horrifying. I've never seen such thin awful thin plastic that was 100% for sure going to break. I have no confidence in these headphones. And they claim to be closed but they don't reduce sound at all. These broken hyperx cloud II's, just putting them on my head block out more sound than the AT M50x's playing music. It's like they don't even try.

I returned them and my stomach is in knots. Goddamn I got buyers remorse on these.

The Sennheiser HD 598s look sturdier, though still plastic, but the answered questions on amazon seem to suggest that they do not even try to block out sound coming or going. If someone is on a phone call behind me are they going to pick up computer stuff played at a reasonable volume?

Are you sure you got M50x?

I really dislike them for a bunch of reasons but they're not flimsy, and unless they completely don't fit your ears or you're using velour pads they should isolate decently well. Could they have been a knockoff?

The M50 are definitely sturdier than 598s. I guess the question is, what do you want from a headphone? Do you need isolation and low leakage? Do you need them to be portable? What sources are you using? Check out the OP, there's a guide for how to post a request for recommendations. If you can answer some of those questions, we can likely make a good recommendation.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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TheQuietWilds posted:

I'm looking for a headphone recommendation. I'm a medical student, and our school posts all the lectures online, and I find that a better use of time than attending lectures, since you can stop/replay as well as manipulate the playback speed. I'm looking for a headphone with at least moderate isolation, that folds up and comes with, or has optionally available, a hard-case for transit. I take a lot of public transit and my backpack takes a lot of bumps and whatnot, so that's non-negotiable. I listen to music while reading occasionally, but am not ultra concerned about sound quality. That said I'm mostly listening to classical, jazz or ambient/post-rock, so I'd prefer a more neutral sound vs a hyped bass. I'll probably be getting the new MacPro launching some time next month, which reportedly doesn't have a headphone jack, so I guess it has to be Bluetooth. Budget could go up to $250-300 for a perfect solution but would prefer to spend less.

Don't get wireless headphones just because of the no-port rumor. A: It's just a rumor, nobody knows anything until it gets announced or there's a real leak, and B: if it turns out to be true, there will be an explosion of cheap, decent USB-C amp/dacs. Bluetooth headphones have come a long way in sound quality, but they're still a pain in the rear end for a lot of other reasons.

If you still want wireless, in that price range I'd try the Sennheiser Momentum or Sony MDR1RBT. If you don't, you've got much better options for much less cash.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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The T50RP are definitely really loving hard to drive. I think a good rule of thumb is: if your amp is purely USB powered, it's probably not gonna cut it. The way I see it is that for most people they're amazing $250 headphones that come with a free amp. To elaborate:

T50RP Mk3: $160
Shure 1540 pads (non negotiable upgrade, the stock pads are hellish): $40
An SMSL SAP-VI to drive the things: $50

So the $160 price point is a little deceiving, but what you end up with is planars that sound better in my opinion than the oppo PM3 and compete with the Hifiman 400i, both of which cost $150 more than you'll spend on the whole package I just described.

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Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

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emdash posted:

Electronics idiot question: I have a headphone amp with only 3.5mm input. I also have an integrated amp with an RCA tape recorder output. Is it safe to use a 3.5mm->male RCA splitter to get the integrated amp output into the headphone amp?

Yes, they're both line level, so that'll work fine.

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