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korora
Sep 3, 2011


andrew smash posted:

Does CoQ have any particular dependencies? I'm going to try to get it running in wine.

You have to install .NET in wine first and make sure to run it with the '-console' flag. I couldn't get it to work without cd-ing into the game directory first but if I do that it runs fine in wine on Mac. I should note I've only played a very small amount so if there's something that breaks wine later on I wouldn't know.

See also http://forums.freeholdentertainment...ing-under-Linux.

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korora
Sep 3, 2011


Legerdemain
Cost: Free



Genre: Interactive Fiction with a Roguelike interface
Graphics: Tiles/Unicode
Platform: Anything with Java
Forks: No

In Legerdemain, instead of choosing a class and maybe some starting attributes, you are instead asked a series of multiple-choice questions—basically a personality test. Based on your answers, the game assigns your character a starting magic school and stats and throws you right in. The first bit of Legerdemain plays out in pretty standard roguelike fashion: you start in a dungeon (in which you were, until recently, a prisoner) with no skills and few items. You explore a bit, then you die, and you have to start over with a fresh character.

Once you figure out some of the systems at play, you can escape from the dungeon. Just down the road is a town with an inn inside a giant pumpkin, in which you can save your game, and restore after you die. From this point on, the game reveals its true nature as a Roguelike/Interactive Fiction hybrid. There is no permadeath and very little procedural content, so this game is not for the roguelike purist! On the other hand, Legerdemain offers a well-written, though linear, story in a weird fantasy setting that is quite different from the standard elf/dwarf fare.

The latest version of Legerdemain has optional tiles (on by default) which are pretty unattractive. I strongly recommend turning tiles off by pressing 'I', because Legerdemain makes excellent use of the full Unicode character set, choosing characters that look like the objects they represent: in the bottom bar of the screenshot, you can see in my inventory (after the 'I:') I have an arrow, a mushroom, some torches, and two knives.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


I'll take Dungeonmans if it gets to me, otherwise Risk of Rain. This is me: http://steamcommunity.com/id/korora

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Hey, have the contest prizes gone out? I haven't received anything and just want to make sure it's not something wrong on my end. (I picked Dungeonmans and am super excited about it).

korora
Sep 3, 2011


madjackmcmad posted:

Hey Korora! The alpha isn't out yet but you're in, day 1. Email me, jim@dungeonmans.com, and I'll have you ready to go when the alpha happens, and I'll also give you the zircon albums that were in the $25 and up sweetener for the Kickstarter.
Oh cool, I didn't realize the alpha isn't out yet. Just sent you an email.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


madjackmcmad posted:

the position of the key you press doesn't correspond at all with the direction you move and you're begging to make missteps
That's really only true of J/K though. The rest of the keys have the same relative positions as their directions.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Pladdicus posted:

That review is hillarious. Specifically though, what about VI improves your gameplay? Just the...mechanical effort making you more thoughtful?
It's way faster because you're keeping your hands on the home row. Once you learn what the directions are you don't think about the letters and you also don't have to move your hand to open your inventory (or whatever else is on the right half of the keyboard) so you can really get into a groove.

As a side note, the vi-keys come from vi, a text editor that dates back to the 70s but is still great today. What sets vi apart as a text editor is that it's all ascii, all of the commands are triggered by single keystrokes (hjkl to move the cursor, i to insert text, o to open a new line, p to paste text, etc.), it has a steep learning curve but is extremely powerful once you learn how to use it, and most people have never heard of it. It's the roguelike of text editing and it's the best.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


IronicDongz posted:

You don't need a weird control scheme where directions aren't in the corresponding places to have your hands on home row.

ex: in DCSS I have wasd and the buttons around it, aka
QWE
ASD
ZXC
bound for movement, so I have diagonals, my hands are on home row, and it's not a jarring transition between that and non-roguelike games which use wasd for movement.
Having both hands on the main keyboard is not the same as being on home row. WADS and vi-keys are both great but they were developed for very different games that have very different needs. In roguelikes you only use one button at a time but you still usually have diagonal movement; the vi-keys are optimized around being able to reach most directions comfortably with the index finger (yuhjbn) and the other two directions have dedicated fingers so you don't have to reach much with your lesser digits.

With WADS, you don't need diagonal keys because you can combine two directions to move diagonally, plus you are (usually) separately changing your orientation with the mouse for even finer adjustments. You still don't need to do much reaching with your weaker fingers so everything works just fine. (Although I do find WADS to be more fatiguing because you have to keep your fingers closer together.)

Your crazy scheme, on the other hand, makes my hand hurt just looking at it. The least common letters, Q and Z, are in the corners of the keyboard for a reason: because the corners of the keyboard are uncomfortable to reach to. Seriously just try the vi-keys for a while, your hand will thank me later.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


chiefnewo posted:

Do you play roguelikes with your hands on the keyboard as if you are going to touch-type? Personally I just rest a hand on whatever keys I'm using for movement and use my other hand for entering commands. My argument against the WASD as you'll likely have to rebind a bunch of commands such as Wield/Wear etc. depending on your roguelike.

I do, but that's also a good reason to use vi-keys.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

So hey, any chances of Dungeonmans getting an OSX port? It looks like a neato game, but I usually can't be bothered to reboot into Windows.
Mac user here, I play Dmans in Wine and it works great.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Unormal posted:

??04F-TBCM0-I8HYH (a little worse than regular canned vegetable juice)

Got this one (it was V7).

korora
Sep 3, 2011


nutranurse posted:

Is porting Dungeonmans to mac at all in your list of things you'll consider?

It's a bit of extra effort but Dungeonmans runs pretty well in wine. I posted my steps to get it running somewhere in the Dungeonmans thread.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Unimpressed posted:

Been thinking about your game, any chance it will run under wine on the mac? Have you heard from anyone doing it?

I've done it. Look at my post history for details. Works great.

e: actually I might have posted about it in the Dungeonmans thread, not this one.

e2: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...0#post439769191

korora fucked around with this message at Nov 28, 2015 around 00:58

korora
Sep 3, 2011


Tagichatn posted:

This might be the wrong place to ask, but do you guys have any recommendations for mid-range laptops with numpads? Super low spec games are pretty much the only thing my current laptop can play but it's a pain in the rear end to play roguelikes without a numpad.
Learn to use vi-keys, numpads are for casuals.

korora
Sep 3, 2011


PleasingFungus posted:

What exactly does levelling up do? It seems like items make tiles spawn with larger values (and eventually have other effects, judging by the 'no special effects' on every item I've seen), and levelling up your HP seems to increase your max, but what on earth do attack & defense upgrades do?

Attack/Shield/Heal tiles are drawn with face values between your relevant item stat and character stat. (You can see the range on your character summary screen). Leveling up also gets you perks which are absurdly important because they unlock item abilities, secondary stat boosts on items, passive attack/defense gain, etc.

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korora
Sep 3, 2011


Dream Quest.

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