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numbs
Jul 20, 2013

by XyloJW


I just can't get into this type of music. I'm a very musically open person though.

I went to a Phish concert a few months back, and the following is MASSIVE. There are some dedicated people following this band.

Yet, I can't seem to enjoy it. Someone explain this genre to me, because I'm not understanding.

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Roark
Dec 1, 2009

A moderate man - a violently moderate man.

numbs posted:

I just can't get into this type of music. I'm a very musically open person though.

I went to a Phish concert a few months back, and the following is MASSIVE. There are some dedicated people following this band.

Yet, I can't seem to enjoy it. Someone explain this genre to me, because I'm not understanding.

I'll start off by saying - before everyone else dogpiles on with this - Phish ≠ the Grateful Dead, and a lot of Deadheads dislike Phish (myself included). The best way that I can put it is that Phish is a jam band, with the express purpose of being jam band and playing to stoner college students and at festivals; the Dead were a rock band who could and did jam - and, unlike Phish, didn't have to turn every single song that they played into a 20 minute long jam. They could do a 5 minute long "Me and My Uncle" or a 35 minute long Dark Star.

That might sound pedantic, but it's true: Phish plays a 30 minute, droning funk bassline with mediocre guitar work and totally unmemorable lyrics and melodies; the members of the Dead came from diverse musical backgrounds, and they wrote music that was often technically very complex. Most of Blues for Allah, for example, has Steely Dan levels of technicality. And when they jammed, they incorporated a level of technicality into their jamming that you don't get with Phish. To put it another way, Phish set out to be what the Dead are often stereotyped as being, but weren't. I find them to be sloppy and derivative, and their early stuff (when the Dead were still active) sounds like a college frat band trying to imitate the Dead.

But I'll stop sperging about Phish (and there's likely other views about them here; I was just going into a common Deadhead rant), and answer your question.

Like I said above, the Dead incorporated a serious level of musicianship into their playing, and when they were having a good period or a good night during a "bad period", they were drat impressive. They could go off on 30-minute long, exploratory improvisations during a rendition of "Dark Star" or "Playing in the Band" or "Help on the Way/Slipknot!", but it would still be tight for all 30 minutes and would go in directions that you didn't expect and pull in diverse influences. And then they could follow it up with a 4 minute long version of "Dire Wolf" almost by the book. That's the strength of the Dead and their huge, huge live back catalog: the diversity, the level of skill, and the fact that you can always find something new or a different spin on something that you're used to.

Roark fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 14:45

Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



Roark posted:

They could do a 5 minute long "Me and My Uncle" or a 35 minute long Dark Star.

Phish has a lot of short songs that don't turn into extended jams, especially their country and bluegrass style songs.

I'll certainly grant that their lyrics are never worthwhile compared to the Dead, but your other comments about them seem just as ignorant as the idea of lumping them and the Dead together. A lot of Phish's longer songs are actually complex progressive rock songs, not random droney jams, and there is definitely a high level of musicianship in what they do as well. While their guitarist is certainly guilty of some awful live moments, he's actually a great musician when he's not completely hosed up, and while I don't listen to them much anymore I still consider Page McConnell one of my favorite rock keyboardists, its hard to deny the level of serious musicianship in his work.

Earwicker fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 15:01

Roark
Dec 1, 2009

A moderate man - a violently moderate man.

Earwicker posted:

When he's not completely hosed up

Another difference is that there was a chance of seeing the Dead coherent and on form even during the heaviest drug periods.

I've seen Phish 6 times, and 3 of those 6 shows were sloppy messes where Anastasio was high as a kite and all over the place in the way that Jerry was on bad days towards the end. Droning. Missed chords. Repeating lyrics again and again. The rest of the band was trying to cover it up, and the shows were just messy and sounded like the love child of 90s Dead and bad Pink Floyd with bad lyrics by frat bros(Got a blank space where my mind should be/Got a CLIF Bar and some cold green tea). For $100 a ticket at the Garden, you better bring your A-game and not...that.

I wouldn't pay again to see them, and it's soured me on them beyond the semi-usual Deadhead dislike at them - a jam band with heavy prog roots - being compared to the Dead.

Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



Yeah I was lucky enough to have gotten to see them a couple times before he got really bad. Anyway I agree they have put on a lot of terrible shows largely thanks to Trey's drug use, and they'd have been a far better band if they'd made him go to rehab or even fired him- I'm just saying that they weren't all about droney jams, they are all actually very seriously good musicians who could be very tight and who could also write good shorter songs in a wide variety of styles as well - they all them have great rock, country, and jazz chops. A lot of wasted potential in a way.

BigFactory
Sep 17, 2002



Hasn't Trey famously been clean for several years now?

And I think if you take away the bluegrass stuff, Phish is a lot closer sounding to Yes than to the Dead. Trey steals from Steve Howe way more than he steals from Jerry.

Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



huh I guess you're right, I hadn't really paid attention to them in years. I heard about his arrest but didn't realize he'd been clean since then. Good for him.

And yeah they definitely sound more derivative of 70's prog rock than derivative of the Dead. However they used to cover Dead songs in their early days which I think is where that association started.

MixMasterMalaria
Jul 26, 2007


Okay, at the encouragement of some of you deadgoons I did end up going to see Furthur at the Greek on the last night of the tour. What a fantastic experience! The crowd was really into it (and full of serious deadheads of all ages) and the parking lot scene was very interesting. Everyone was dancing like their lives depended on it and the number of people who were in enhanced states of consciousness seemed like it would rival a music festival. The music was very satisfying, and to finally be at a dead family event in person was a more sentimental experience than I had expected.

I've listened to the archive tapes a couple of times now, but does anyone know if it's worth picking up the multi-track recording from Furthur's website?


http://archive.org/details/furthur-2013-10-06
I really enjoyed the St. Stephen.

BigFactory
Sep 17, 2002



That's a pretty good setlist. Was Phil drinking a Heineken when he asked you to give him another liver?

Roark
Dec 1, 2009

A moderate man - a violently moderate man.

Updated the new release post (right under the OP) with some new, long-lost goodies coming out after Thanksgiving.

Hollis Brownsound
Apr 2, 2009

by Lowtax


RE Phish: Phuck Phish.

Yiggy
Sep 12, 2004

"Imagination is not enough. You have to have knowledge too, and an experience of the oddity of life."


The distinction that the Dead were not a Jam band, but a Rock Band who could Jam when they wanted to, seems like a really thin, pedantic distinction to me. The thrust of their music when they started was definitely on the jammy side of things. The idea that it was a band of Very Serious musicians is also slightly spurious (except Jerry, that guy was seriously into his bluegrass and roots music, no argument there). Before Phil was looped into playing gigs, he didn't even play bass. Yeah he formally studied music and over time that shows in his playing, but even then he was still just a student with a background when he was recruited, he wasn't accomplished or anything. Bobby was just one of Jerry's guitar students. Pigpen was this greasy haired kid following Jerry around who loved blues and crooning, picked up some low level keys skills to sit in on some gigs. Now, did they become amazing musicians night after night of playing together? Absolutely, there is an interview with Jerry where he points out that, to paraphrase, "Playing the gig is the best practice." And at the outset what you can describe their music as is more closely to jammier tone poem sort of songs than any sort of coherent, rock band fare. And even when they started writing more conventional song form music, they never abandoned or played down their jammier roots, in the least. Improvisation is such a clear core value of their playing, and something so generally absent from most Rock bands, that calling the Dead a Rock band that (can) jam seems to really be selling them short, to me at least.


numbs posted:

I just can't get into this type of music. I'm a very musically open person though.

I went to a Phish concert a few months back, and the following is MASSIVE. There are some dedicated people following this band.

Yet, I can't seem to enjoy it. Someone explain this genre to me, because I'm not understanding.

Dude Phish is weird. From the lot to the stage & music, that scene is just very... strange. But, even though they're not one of my favorites by any stretch, I find some good parts in their music.

I'm assuming you're referring specifically to and asking about jam band music, so I'm going to try to elaborate on that.

Jam bands, whats the deal with jam music? Well first off, most jam bands sound very different, and thats because Jam Band music is not really a musical genre in the way we typically think of them (e.g. metal, ska, reggae, etc.) but rather a band that, whatever their musical tastes and roots, is emphasizing improvisation and novelty as key aspects of their live performance. And so naturally even though there is unarguably a scene of jam bands and music, a lot of times different bands' jamming sounds nothing alike. Each band is going to have certain roots and genres they like to draw from, will have songs couched firmly in one genre or another, but then in live play the song(s) will be expanded, will run into other songs, etc.

Here is a variety of different jam bands and what I feel their emphasis/roots are.

The Grateful Dead: Mostly blues, bluegrass, roots/americana
Phish: Prog rock, jazz
Umphrey's McGee: Metal, prog, rock n roll
String Cheese Incident: Mostly bluegrass, jazz, funk, country
Widespread Panic: Classic rock n roll, blues, metal

There are some other notable jam bands I'm leaving out but I haven't listened to them as much, so I don't want to comment. At live shows, jam bands will take the musical idioms from their familiar backgrounds and fuse them together in interesting ways. Now the thing is, with a lot of these jam bands they have a pretty big catalog of songs they draw from, and the real enjoyment of being familiar with the music comes along when you're able to follow the sets, feel where they're going as they move from one song to another, ride the tension and release from one song, one idea, one jam to the next. Especially if you've been seeing this band night after night, when every set is different, the sets and the music take on a more transactional quality than a typical live music set will, there is a back and forth between the bandmates, the music, and the fans that you don't run into at more vanilla, straight-set-list-from-night-to-night shows.

At the heart though, whats most important in Jam Band music is the improvisation and the interaction between the musicians on stage. Different bands handle these moments differently, but for an example I'll describe something really cool that Umphrey's McGee does for their jams. Typically they call them Jimmy Stewarts, and these parts of the show are 100% improvised, no song that they're jamming out of as a vehicle which they may or may not return to. In these Jimmy Stewarts, the band will communicate with each other with various hand signals they've worked out. So lets say their lead guitarist, Jake, will play out a solo for a bit and then throw out the hand signal that he's going to switch keys to A, or whatever and the band follows tightly. This gives the music a spontaneous, live element thats just awesome to experience. Sometimes the improvisations aren't always a hit, but when they find that sweet spot, and you're hearing a fresh, collaborative improvisation for the first time, produced on the spot, thats just a really sublime experience (for jam band fans, at least). Like I said though, different bands do it differently, I haven't seen the others use a system of communication and signals as elaborate as UM. When I saw Furthur though Phil was very clearly leading all of the jams, sometimes explicitly calling out moves on the bands internal mic, sometimes guiding it very gently with his bass lines.

This sort of jamming tradition is something that extends straight out of the small combo jazz of the 50's and 60's, when music was becoming less about just dancing to it and more about experiencing it as live art that musicians create. Now, jam bands seem to be preserving part of this element (the dedicated to improv), while still maintaining that dancible quality to the music that a lot of later Jazz was clearly losing touch with.

Yiggy fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 21:59

Yiggy
Sep 12, 2004

"Imagination is not enough. You have to have knowledge too, and an experience of the oddity of life."


MixMasterMalaria posted:

Okay, at the encouragement of some of you deadgoons I did end up going to see Furthur at the Greek on the last night of the tour. What a fantastic experience! The crowd was really into it (and full of serious deadheads of all ages) and the parking lot scene was very interesting. Everyone was dancing like their lives depended on it and the number of people who were in enhanced states of consciousness seemed like it would rival a music festival. The music was very satisfying, and to finally be at a dead family event in person was a more sentimental experience than I had expected.

I've listened to the archive tapes a couple of times now, but does anyone know if it's worth picking up the multi-track recording from Furthur's website?


http://archive.org/details/furthur-2013-10-06
I really enjoyed the St. Stephen.

Thats awesome! I drove all the way out from Texas to catch them on Friday night but I had to book it to the Bay Area the next morning and so I didn't get to see the other two nights. I'm glad to hear someone say how much they enjoyed it. Friday was just awesome, following the set list after the fact apparently they were squeezing a lot of songs in on this run that they hadn't played in awhile. I got a Hey Pocky Way, which was nice. The Darkstar they played was really great too, they went from Darkstar to Eyes of the World with Phil singing (and he sounded really good! So glad I got to see them after they had a day of rest), back into Dark Star, then into Box of Rain, teasing Dark Star's melody a little bit right before finishing Box, and then finishing with Black Peter and Shakedown Street. It was awesome!

As for the official soundboards, I sprang for it. I saw them at Interlocken and got those sets too, but before doing so listened to the archived version a few times on the drive home. The soundboard version was better for the Interlocken shows. I didn't bother checking for the Friday night Greek Set before I purchased, but the quality of the soundboard is very good for the first night of that run, probably will be for Sunday too.

Stravinsky
May 31, 2011




I was going to come in and basically post what you just said so thanks for saving me time. However I really feel like Phish has lost a lot of what I used to find enjoyment from them back in the day. They used to be a big proggy jazz fusion band and I really felt that they have left that all behind to become a "stereotypical" rock jam band a long time ago. I have theorized that they started turning this way as Trey started to take more and more of a leading role along with going deeper into his addictions. And when they came back together with the new sober Trey, they just kept going that direction. I want to say it may also be partly due to just complacency because Phish has a big following and can pull a crowd so they may just not feel like they need to try as much as they used too. Most real creativity and energy is going to their side projects which are nowhere as big as Phish is and are just using Phish as a money making vehicle.

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


If we were to speak solely about timbre, (i.e., the tone of the instruments and the overall mix), I feel like there's a lot of similarity between the Dead's music from the late 70s onward and Phish. I like the sound of late 60s/early 70s rock and roll, so neither does much for me.

I revisited the classic Feb.-Mar. '69 Fillmore shows recently, and I'm convinced that 2/28/69 is one of the best shows the Dead ever played. The 27th has the untouchable Mountains Of The Moon->Dark Star->St. Stephen, but it can't match the power of the Eleven, Lovelight and Alligator->Caution from the 28th. Pigpen is in fine form in the first bluesy set, which also features a Doin' That Rag that might be my favorite version.

Cut the 27th and 28th together (the gap after "answer man" is perfect), and you've got some of the essential, maybe quintessential Dead.

Roark
Dec 1, 2009

A moderate man - a violently moderate man.

Juaguocio posted:

I revisited the classic Feb.-Mar. '69 Fillmore shows recently, and I'm convinced that 2/28/69 is one of the best shows the Dead ever played. The 27th has the untouchable Mountains Of The Moon->Dark Star->St. Stephen, but it can't match the power of the Eleven, Lovelight and Alligator->Caution from the 28th. Pigpen is in fine form in the first bluesy set, which also features a Doin' That Rag that might be my favorite version.

I gave those shows a listen again yesterday during work after reading this, and it really is peak late 60's Dead. Mountains->Dark Star->St. Stephen is so smooth that it's really hard to remember that they're still a pretty young band at that point.

In other stuff, Dark Star Orchestra is playing around here in mid-December. Has anyone seen them recently? I saw them about 5 years ago, but the lineup has changed since then.

trans fat
Jul 29, 2007



Deadheads I've met in real life have seemed almost offended that I would dare to prefer studio Dead to live Dead on some occasions. Box of Rain is a perfect example of this, in that I've yet to hear a rendition of it that really, really captured what it has on American Beauty. Given how emotional and personal of a song it is, it disappoints me that I can't really hear some great soul-bearing jams. Please guide me, wiser Deadheads.

Hollis Brownsound
Apr 2, 2009

by Lowtax


trans fat posted:

Deadheads I've met in real life have seemed almost offended that I would dare to prefer studio Dead to live Dead on some occasions. Box of Rain is a perfect example of this, in that I've yet to hear a rendition of it that really, really captured what it has on American Beauty. Given how emotional and personal of a song it is, it disappoints me that I can't really hear some great soul-bearing jams. Please guide me, wiser Deadheads.

Honestly there are only a couple songs from "American Beauty" that I prefer live. "Truckin" and "Candyman" might be the only ones. But everything else on that album is so perfectly captured that I don't want to hear it any other way.

RE: Box of Rain, required Phil to sing live, that's all I really need to say.

BigFactory
Sep 17, 2002



Yeah, I can't think of any amazing live Box of Rains that stand out. They didn't play it that much. I have a friend who saw the first Unbroken Chain down in Miami in '92 or something (speaking of Phil songs). He said people freaked out once they figured out what it was. I think he saw like 3 of the 4 times they played that song.

Edit: It was in Philly and it was 95.

http://www.setlists.net/?show_id=2310 The comments about the show here are hilarious. Was there. UC was great, but made me remember why I didn't mind that Phil didn't sing very much.

I'm going to edit this again, cause this is pretty cool: http://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/60257224. It's a graph of every time every song was played. Box of Rain was played 168 times, which is more than I would have guessed (vs. like 500 Truckin's), it's just that it was mostly played from 1986-on. That's why it feels like they almost never played it to me, I guess. Once in '70, a few times in '72, then they brought it back in '86.

BigFactory fucked around with this message at Oct 25, 2013 around 12:58

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy

When did he blow his voice out? It was pretty early on from memory. And they didn't actually play it that often before he did and it was before they had decent monitors on stage.

Juan Berenguer
Feb 21, 2006


LordPants posted:

When did he blow his voice out? It was pretty early on from memory. And they didn't actually play it that often before he did and it was before they had decent monitors on stage.

https://archive.org/details/gd70-09...7591.sbeok.shnf

This is the earliest live performance that circulates, and it sounds pretty good to my ears

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy

Yeah I'm pretty sure he blew his voice out in or around '73. Anything after that is not going to sound so good. Very early 70s, 72 even he still had that great upper register.

Arms_Akimbo
Sep 29, 2006

It's so damn...literal.

trans fat posted:

Deadheads I've met in real life have seemed almost offended that I would dare to prefer studio Dead to live Dead on some occasions. Box of Rain is a perfect example of this, in that I've yet to hear a rendition of it that really, really captured what it has on American Beauty. Given how emotional and personal of a song it is, it disappoints me that I can't really hear some great soul-bearing jams. Please guide me, wiser Deadheads.

It might not be their best version musically, but Box of Rain was the very last song the Dead played as a cohesive whole, so as a fan of the band, you should appreciate the Soldier Field show closer.

Blast Fantasto
Sep 17, 2007

USAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!


If you're really in to studio Dead, give Dick's Pick's 8 a shot. I'm like you, with the exception of DP8 being my favorite Dead release ever. It opens with a lengthy, raw acoustic set that reminds me of their studio work. Then after that has an electric set that really grooves.

Check it out, it's on Spotify.

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy

Dick's Picks 29. Haven't listened to the Dead seriously for a while, but wow the sound is amazing, so crisp. All the parts laying on top of each other in just the right spaces. Can't beat a rocking Promised Land opener (my personal favorite).

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


Hey, I was just thinking about getting back into the Dead too. I've been on an afrobeat/R&B binge over the last little while.

I really like listening to shows that match the current month, so I think I might give Dick's Picks 14 (11/30 - 12/02/1973) a try. I think I mentioned the "Playing" from 12/02 earlier in the thread, but I've never actually sat down and checked out the whole show.

edit: 12/02/73 is a very good show. There's a really neat transition between "Wharf Rat" and "Mississippi Half-Step" that I can't recall hearing them do before.

Juaguocio fucked around with this message at Dec 2, 2013 around 19:29

tank9900
Mar 27, 2004

English, motherfucker, do you speak it?

Roark posted:

I gave those shows a listen again yesterday during work after reading this, and it really is peak late 60's Dead. Mountains->Dark Star->St. Stephen is so smooth that it's really hard to remember that they're still a pretty young band at that point.

In other stuff, Dark Star Orchestra is playing around here in mid-December. Has anyone seen them recently? I saw them about 5 years ago, but the lineup has changed since then.

Late reply but I saw them back in the beginning of October and it was fantastic. My dad and I went and he was blown away at how much they sounded like a band he grew up listening to. It was great for him too, closed the 2nd set with Morning Dew, his favorite song. Definitely go see them.

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


December 6 is another very nice show from fall/winter 1973. This period isn't the strongest vocally, but the band is incredibly precise with its arrangements and transitions. The Winter '73 jams have a certain "crispness" that I enjoy a lot.

This particular show is tight throughout, with excellent performances of They Love Each Other, China->Rider, Here Comes Sunshine and Dark Star->Eyes->Stella Blue. Dark Star gets pretty far out there. The verse is preceded by a 20 minute jazz odyssey, and followed by a Phil solo that leads into a full-on, pod-of-whales-getting-nuked meltdown. The subsequent Eyes isn't one of the best, but does have some interesting jamming during the outro.

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy

There were some amazing Sunshines in this period. Really strange that they dropped it in a couple of weeks. It was played again during the '74 Winterland Rehearsal Shows but that was it until it was reborn in '92.

Hollis Brownsound
Apr 2, 2009

by Lowtax


'Here Comes Sunshine' is a terribly underrated Dead tune.

I've been kind of been in off the Dead kick recently, which I frankly kind of needed. But I'm feeling the itch again and it might be time to start exploring some of the 80s stuff I've tuned out.

Anecdotally, I was at local bar in Washington PA at noon, when a bunch of oil field workers put on the Without a Net version of 'Eyes', we got to talking about the Dead bought me and my boss a beer. It was sweet.

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


Similarly, I find it odd that the band didn't play Bird Song at all from '74 through '79. It seems like a natural fit for their mid-to-late 70s jamming style.

elentar
Aug 26, 2002

Congratulations! Your bonsai is dead!

Grimey Drawer

Joe Russo's Almost Dead, 12/27/13: https://archive.org/details/jrad201...7.cmc641.flac16

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvkUfy_9SmQ

Majik Ninja
Jan 16, 2004


No Furthur is pretty sad for the year that I finally decided that I was going to be serious about doing fall tour, but anyone doing Ratdog dates? I'm in northwest Florida but I am for sure doing Atlanta and seriously considering trying to do both TN shows.

Tower Theater, Upper Darby, PA Friday, February 14
Tower Theater, Upper Darby, PA Saturday, February 15
Lincoln Theatre, Washington, DC Monday, February 17
Lincoln Theatre, Washington, DC Tuesday, February 18
Wellmont Theater, Montclair, NJ Thursday, February 20
NYCB Theatre at Westbury, Westbury, NY Friday, February 21
NYCB Theatre at Westbury, Westbury, NY Saturday, February 22
House of Blues, Boston, MA Monday, February 24
House of Blues, Boston, MA Tuesday, February 25
State Theatre, Portland, ME Wednesday, February 26
Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, VT Friday, February 28
Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY Saturday, March 1
Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY Sunday, March 2
Shea's Performing Arts Center, Buffalo, NY, Tuesday, March 4
Fillmore Detroit, Detroit, MI, Wednesday, March 5
Chicago Theatre, Chicago, IL, Friday, March 7
Riverside Theater, Milwaukee, WI, Saturday, March 8
The Pageant, St. Louis, MO, Monday, March 10
Old National Centre, Indianapolis, IN, Tuesday, March 11
Louisville Palace Theater, Louisville, KY, Wednesday, March 12
Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville, TN, Friday, March 14
Ryman Auditorium, Nashville, TN, Saturday, March 15
The Tabernacle, Atlanta, GA, Sunday, March 16

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero



Killer. I think that's the best version I've heard; most are pretty underwhelming.

I think I'm going to try to listen to all of Europe '72 over the next little while.

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011



Lipstick Apathy

Juaguocio posted:

Killer. I think that's the best version I've heard; most are pretty underwhelming.

I think I'm going to try to listen to all of Europe '72 over the next little while.

gently caress godspeed man. It's either going to be amazing or you're going to burn out like a motherfucker.

Yiggy
Sep 12, 2004

"Imagination is not enough. You have to have knowledge too, and an experience of the oddity of life."


I started that the other month, listening to sets on my walks, and I needed a break after a bit. A whole lot of pig pen songs, also Black Throated Wind which I'm not too crazy about.

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


Yiggy posted:

I started that the other month, listening to sets on my walks, and I needed a break after a bit. A whole lot of pig pen songs, also Black Throated Wind which I'm not too crazy about.

I dig both of those things, luckily. Black Throated Wind isn't very interesting lyrically, but it has some cool rhythms, and I like Bobby's yelling in the outro.

4/14 is the winner so far. Good Lovin->Caution->Good Lovin rips!

Empress Brosephine
Mar 31, 2012


Winner of the "Poor Games Poster" avatar.

Archive.Org has a whole buttload of legal live shows for download:

https://archive.org/details/GratefulDead

Does anyone know of a good show around the Shakedown Street era? That's my favorite era of Dead.

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An Apple A Gay
Oct 21, 2008






Here's an interview from 81, really cool to hear him, and he smokes a jay on one of the tracks. The uploader did a poor job sequencing, but you guys can figure it out.

https://archive.org/details/jg1981-07-10-Interview.shnf

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