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Captainsalami
Apr 16, 2010

I told you you'd pay!


So I love red beans and rice, the zatarans box poo poo, and I'd like to upgrade to a nicer version, but it's a little bit of a pain in the rear end to get hambones and stuff up here outside of buying your own, not to mention a lack of energy to do a lot of cooking after a my workday. Whats a good seasoning mix I can use to more or less achieve the same type of flavors there with rice and red beans?

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OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Made the jambalaya recipe from the OP. Killer. Used my own homemade chicken stock, skipped the tomato paste because the fartsypants grocery store by my house doesn't carry any. I dumped in a bit of the local ale I was drinking even though I had stock on hand, because yum beer. Did it stovetop and it worked fine, no scorching on the bottom, maybe because of the extra liquid from the beer. Thanks!




e: Also used brown rice because I like it and it's what I had on hand.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

OMGVBFLOL posted:

Made the jambalaya recipe from the OP. Killer. Used my own homemade chicken stock, skipped the tomato paste because the fartsypants grocery store by my house doesn't carry any. I dumped in a bit of the local ale I was drinking even though I had stock on hand, because yum beer. Did it stovetop and it worked fine, no scorching on the bottom, maybe because of the extra liquid from the beer. Thanks!




e: Also used brown rice because I like it and it's what I had on hand.

Nice! That's really cool. How did you like it with brown rice? I've used that before in gumbo and etoufee but never in Jambalaya yet since the rice: liquid ratio is more important and I never got comfortable enough to put a different grain in there.

Also yeah on the beer, just finishing up a tupperware for lunch today of the last pot of Jambalaya I had that used beer almost entirely as the liquid added and can still notice the nice flavor coming through from that. Definitely using it heavily in the next batch.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Breaky posted:

Nice! That's really cool. How did you like it with brown rice? I've used that before in gumbo and etoufee but never in Jambalaya yet since the rice: liquid ratio is more important and I never got comfortable enough to put a different grain in there.

Also yeah on the beer, just finishing up a tupperware for lunch today of the last pot of Jambalaya I had that used beer almost entirely as the liquid added and can still notice the nice flavor coming through from that. Definitely using it heavily in the next batch.

I added the beer after the tomatoes and before the stock. It didn't feel like the tomatoes had dropped in enough liquid to stop the rice toasting. It was kind of a spontaneous "No burn rice! " thing so I just eyeballed it. Maybe 1/2c or so. I probably just about lucked into the right amount of extra liquid to handle the brown rice, because the texture seems about what's described as correct, and the rice at the bottom was just starting to form a crust that was easily scraped and folded in with the parsley and onions.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

OMGVBFLOL posted:

I added the beer after the tomatoes and before the stock. It didn't feel like the tomatoes had dropped in enough liquid to stop the rice toasting. It was kind of a spontaneous "No burn rice! " thing so I just eyeballed it. Maybe 1/2c or so. I probably just about lucked into the right amount of extra liquid to handle the brown rice, because the texture seems about what's described as correct, and the rice at the bottom was just starting to form a crust that was easily scraped and folded in with the parsley and onions.

Sounds perfect. Congrats!

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

Breaky posted:

And Justin Wilson's Homegrown cookbook which I inherited somewhere along the way.

I made my first etouffee tonight (crawfish and shrimp) using this book's recipe as a basis. I was a bit skeptical at first as Wilson doesn't use a roux for his etouffee, but it turned out phenomenally. I'll try another recipe next time, though, as it would have been perfect with a little bit more body.

Hecuba posted:

One thing I only recently realized is how crucial a generous dose of black pepper is to really get that Cajun flavor right. I grew up in Louisiana with a real traditional family and moved to the North in my 20's, only to realize that the food of my homeland wasn't as easy to recreate as my Maw-Maw made it look. It wasn't until I started adding an extra eight or ten cranks of the peppermill to everything that I could actually take a bite and say "mmm... tastes like Cajun." Trinity + good hot sauce (anything besides Crystal is blasphemy ) will get you a long way there, though.

Thanks for the tip. Wilson's recipe actually doesn't call for black pepper (just cayenne and/or hot sauce), and not that I really know firsthand what authentic Cajun flavor should be, but the black pepper was crucial to giving it that wonderful glowing warmth.

Rollersnake fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2013 around 02:32

WaterIsPoison
Nov 5, 2009


I made Jambalaya from the OP too. It's a great recipe, thanks!

Doobie Keebler
May 9, 2005


I made Jambalaya using the ingredients from the OP but I did it in the crock pot. I sweated the veggies and browned the chicken thighs then dumped it all into the crock pot and let it go for about 4 hours. After that I deboned and shredded the chicken then added the rice. I let it go for about 45 minutes and then added some shrimp since I had that in the freezer. 15 minutes more and it was done. Overall it was pretty good.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Never tried it in a crock pot. Did the rice come out alright, ie not mushy?

This is pretty cool seeing people getting something out of it .

Doobie Keebler
May 9, 2005


Since the rice went in near the end it came out just fine. I definitely wouldn't recommend putting it in at the beginning if it's going in the crock pot.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Doobie Keebler posted:

Since the rice went in near the end it came out just fine. I definitely wouldn't recommend putting it in at the beginning if it's going in the crock pot.

That's interesting, I never thought about adding in the rice later on, usually just browned things up, wilted the veggies then just cooked it all at once.

bleedbackwards
Jan 12, 2008
weapon finesse: my dong

It's below 80 degrees in south Louisiana... time to pull out the long johns and make a gumbo!



I grew up eating a super barebones gumbo that my mom cooked. She only used onion and bellpepper (no celery) and okra or filé was unheard of. Onion+bellpepper, roux, chicken, sausage, and Tony's. That was it. (It still tasted amazing, I don't know how she did it.) I add celery (three stalks) to complete the trinity, and for seasoning I use a tablespoon of Tony's, 2-3 bay leaves, a teaspoon of thyme, and a quarter teaspoon of cayenne. Right before it's served I add a teaspoon or so of filé. Tomatoes? Where are you from, Shreveport? Get outta here.

I live alone so I cook a big pot and eat leftovers for lunch every day for like a week. Anyone who has eaten a gumbo can tell you that it's even better the second day after it's been sitting in the fridge.

BLARGHLE
Oct 2, 2013

But I want something good
to die for
To make it beautiful to live.

Yams Fan

I spent a month in Lafayette earlier this year, and it made me realize that not all of the deep south is a horrible shithole! Since then, I've been trying to get all of the cajun food I can stuff in my gullet- chief among my desires is boudin! Nobody sells it in Va, and I'm not sure I want it badly enough to pay almost $100 to get some shipped here.

Also, I lived in Mississippi and Alabama for a few years, and I quickly grew to hate catfish...every friday in montgomery was fish-fry-friday, and the entire city would reek of badly fried catfish(as opposed to the usual stink of paper mill and depression). The only good catfish I've ever had was served atop some crawfish etouffee at some random little diner in Scott(I think?). I have tried my damnedest to replicate it, but it seems that the catfish we get up here is just poo poo in comparison. I've even tried paying out the rear end for the fresh stuff at the wegmans fish counter, but it still tasted like the same garbage you get anywhere else.

Anyway, I don't really remember where I was going with all of this, but cajun and creole food is pretty great. What is also great is the happy hour at the local cajun joint- $2.50 drafts of Abita beers, which is an amazing deal around here.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

bleedbackwards posted:



Tomatoes? Where are you from, Shreveport? Get outta here.


Haha! Nah man, Venice. Can't get much further out there. We tend to run with Okra / tomato over file in a lot of preps. Also use tomatoes in jambalaya, which was the only way I'd had it for years until eating out with some family in Ville Platte and being like "why is this so brown?".

That gumbo looks good man!, and yes, it is always better after a day in the fridge.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


I don't know what it's like in Louisiana, but round Californy-way, tomatoes are way cheaper than almost any meat, and shrimp and other seafood cost approximately their weight in human flesh, so I'll be adding tomatoes to things and I'd better not take any guff about being a fancy-pants!

SavTargaryen
Sep 11, 2011


I just want to say that the red beans and rice recipe posted on the previous page is god drat amazing. Or at least, I'm pretty sure that it was. I ate maybe half a bowl right after it was finished - having made probably 10 bowls' worth, and when I woke up my roommate had consumed it all. So, uh, I guess mark of approval? I'm making another batch tonight that hopefully I'll actually get to eat more of.

Defiance Industries
Jul 22, 2010

I've hacked into the most secret government and corporate secrets.



OMGVBFLOL posted:

I don't know what it's like in Louisiana, but round Californy-way, tomatoes are way cheaper than almost any meat, and shrimp and other seafood cost approximately their weight in human flesh, so I'll be adding tomatoes to things and I'd better not take any guff about being a fancy-pants!

Move to western Oregon and they're BOTH cheap.

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


bleedbackwards posted:

I grew up eating a super barebones gumbo that my mom cooked. She only used onion and bellpepper (no celery) and okra or filé was unheard of. Onion+bellpepper, roux, chicken, sausage, and Tony's. That was it. (It still tasted amazing, I don't know how she did it.) I add celery (three stalks) to complete the trinity, and for seasoning I use a tablespoon of Tony's, 2-3 bay leaves, a teaspoon of thyme, and a quarter teaspoon of cayenne. Right before it's served I add a teaspoon or so of filé. Tomatoes? Where are you from, Shreveport? Get outta here.


Hell yeah, that was the exact gumbo I grew up eating (made by grandma). Only difference was she didn't use Tony's. Over the years I've tried to gussy up my gumbo with celery/garlic/cayenne/green onions/parsley/etc., but it's never as good as chicken, sausage, bell pepper, onion, and roux.

poemdexter
Feb 18, 2005

Hooray Indie Games!


College Slice

How are all you people eating gumbo with no potato salad on the side? Shameful. Also, I like half and half pork sausage and andouille sausage + chicken in gumbo. I'd do seafood if I could get away with it, but the only seafood my wife will eat is boiled crawfish.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


So, someone told me "holy trinity" was equal amoumts by volume of chopped onion, chopped bell pepper, and mashed garlic. How religious is the onion-pepper-celery version seen in this thread and how sacreligious is the onion-pepper-garlic version i've heard elsewhere? Because boy howdy, garlic is the best. If celery is canon I may just have to include it while tripling or quadrupling the garlic content in most cajun recipes (I do this with most recipes anyway, mmmm garlic).

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

OMGVBFLOL posted:

So, someone told me "holy trinity" was equal amoumts by volume of chopped onion, chopped bell pepper, and mashed garlic. How religious is the onion-pepper-celery version seen in this thread and how sacreligious is the onion-pepper-garlic version i've heard elsewhere? Because boy howdy, garlic is the best. If celery is canon I may just have to include it while tripling or quadrupling the garlic content in most cajun recipes (I do this with most recipes anyway, mmmm garlic).

I don't know about the other Louisiana goons in here, but I grew up with lots of garlic in addition to the trinity.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Trinity was always, and I mean always, onion, celery, bell pepper, never heard anyone say otherwise. But yeah, we used garlic considerably depending on the recipe.

Maybe it's like the John the Baptist to the Trinity....

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Maybe I'm just remembering it wrong, then. Thanks!

poemdexter
Feb 18, 2005

Hooray Indie Games!


College Slice

Breaky posted:

Trinity was always, and I mean always, onion, celery, bell pepper, never heard anyone say otherwise. But yeah, we used garlic considerably depending on the recipe.

Maybe it's like the John the Baptist to the Trinity....

It's always been onion, celery, bell pepper. The garlic comes from the creole side of things specifically some of the Caribbean influences. If you've ever had authentic Puerto Rican food, you'll notice that there's garlic in everything.

bleedbackwards
Jan 12, 2008
weapon finesse: my dong

Breaky posted:

Haha! Nah man, Venice. Can't get much further out there. We tend to run with Okra / tomato over file in a lot of preps. Also use tomatoes in jambalaya, which was the only way I'd had it for years until eating out with some family in Ville Platte and being like "why is this so brown?".

That gumbo looks good man!, and yes, it is always better after a day in the fridge.

Interesting! I've lived in St. Martin Parish my whole life, and I've never known anyone around here to use tomatoes. I'd be willing to try it though, I'm sure it lends quite a different flavor.

bolo yeung posted:

Hell yeah, that was the exact gumbo I grew up eating (made by grandma). Only difference was she didn't use Tony's. Over the years I've tried to gussy up my gumbo with celery/garlic/cayenne/green onions/parsley/etc., but it's never as good as chicken, sausage, bell pepper, onion, and roux.

Crazy, isn't it? I used to cook my gumbo the same way but I decided to experiment with different ingredients and I think mine is better when I use everything. I think my mom's is still better than mine though.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


drat where can I get andouile sausage in Finland

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

bleedbackwards posted:

Interesting! I've lived in St. Martin Parish my whole life, and I've never known anyone around here to use tomatoes. I'd be willing to try it though, I'm sure it lends quite a different flavor.


I'm sure its one of those true cajun vs creole variations. Being so close to New Orleans all our stuff runs creole heavy, lots of tomato and garlic compared to out your way.

Pretty neat all the same. I don't think I had Jambalaya without tomato in it until I was almost 20 or so.

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

Breaky posted:

Trinity was always, and I mean always, onion, celery, bell pepper, never heard anyone say otherwise. But yeah, we used garlic considerably depending on the recipe.

Maybe it's like the John the Baptist to the Trinity....

It's funny because if you use onion/celery/carrot (the traditional French trinity) you wind up with a tasty, but very different, base flavor.

I can't wait to begin my career as a flavorist with that insightful statement.

ashgromnies
Jun 19, 2004

by Lowtax


I'm making the jambalaya right now. I have some file powder sitting around, I was gonna add a teaspoon when there is like ten minutes cooking time left because I never get to use it.

Smells and tastes amazing so far. I added some hickory smoked bacon with the sausage and used chicken thighs and got a really nice fond going.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


I'm making the court-bouillon from the recipe in the OP except stupid Whole Foods only had halibut.

I was really hoping they'd have some whole catfish, or some snapper, they often do.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

The Southern Dandy posted:

It's funny because if you use onion/celery/carrot (the traditional French trinity) you wind up with a tasty, but very different, base flavor.

I can't wait to begin my career as a flavorist with that insightful statement.

Yeah it's cool how that works. I make all my roasts with the standard mirepoix, carrots just do so well in there I have to have them.


Save me jeebus posted:

I'm making the court-bouillon from the recipe in the OP except stupid Whole Foods only had halibut.

I was really hoping they'd have some whole catfish, or some snapper, they often do.

It should work just be sure to handle them as little as possible so you don't turn it into a pile of fish flakes.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


I am from New Orleans and this is a fantastic thread and now to my woes at living in Chicago. I made gumbo last night and I bought what I thought andouille sausage because you know the package said andouille sausage. It was not. Andouille Sausage under no circumstance will be "raw", anyway it ruined a huge pot of gumbo . It was disgusting it was like I put just unflavored sausage meat in there.

Also, if you cannot find Filet, a tablespoon of Thyme kind of has a similar flavor or at least aroma. DONT USE A LOT. Filet should be used but you can use some thyme a little bit and get away with it.

Now let's talk about Roux.

The initial post has a great Roux recipe and that's how you should cook it however if you keep burning the poo poo out of it. Here is a great "trick" for roux. Put the iron skillet in the oven at around 200 degrees and then add oil then add flour till it's a wet sand consistency just stir it every 2 to 3 minutes minutes. Add a little bit more oil than flour. If you have a small toaster oven and small iron skillet guess what you can use that. It may take you a few tries if you just keep burning your roux.


Another tip to roux , DON'T DUMP IT ALL IN AT ONCE. Get a cup of oil , and 1 cup or a little more of flour. Go by Teaspoons , add your oil to a iron skillet or thicke and let it heat up, then add another etc.. until it is all silky smooth. This will keep it from clumping up it will also get you the perfect consistency of wet sand which is what you want. You don't gotta use LARD , vegetable oil works fine. If you want a really amazing tasting roux, get duck fat. Yes , Duck Fat and make your roux with that. Same principle. You can also make Roux with Bacon Fat although really that's basically just lard. If you want to have a smokey flavor to your gumbo, you most certainly can. Just smoke your white meat, cook everything else normally then add the smoked meat( I like smoked duck) afterwords. Let it cook for a bit.


And now some tricks for gumbo.

Tired of Okra Seeds all up in your gumbo?

Cut your okra in half length wise take a spoon and drag it length wise to just scoop the seeds out.

Tired of your Shrimp falling to pieces?

Don't add your shrimp until the meal is done. Turn the stove down all the way to pretty much nothing, the gumbo shouldn't even be bumbling. Then put your shrimp in it. This makes it so you don't over cook your shrimp. Just wait for a little bit and your shrimp will cook.

Want a creamy flavor in your Gumbo? (Acquired taste)

When you are done with your roux add a 1/4 to a half of cream to the roux. This is also a base for several soups , I dunno my grandmother did this a lot. It's also a french sauce but the hell if I can remember it.

Want a even more awesome tasting roux that will make people love you more than life itself?

Use smoked butter to make the roux. You can buy this at specialty gourmet stores it can be difficult to find but is worth it.

Gumbo to soupy? Meaning you didn't add enough roux?

Get a half cup of flour and slowly mix in hot water until its smooth ( add the water last). Then add a teaspoon to your gumbo.

Also, if you use okra and Roux, you don't have to use Filet. You shouldn't use all three IE a combination of two of those, Okra and Roux or Okra and Filet , Or Filet and Roux (although that isn't gumbo). Filet, Okra and Roux are all thickening agents. Filet doesn't have a super pronounced flavor but you can tell if gumbo doesn't have it. Usually the Roux is going to have the strongest flavor.

Oh GOD MY ROUX I STILL BURN IT

Roux takes a long time to cook, if you still burn it extend the cooking time. If you are cooking it in 25 minutes you are cooking it to short, spend a longer time with it. It is definitely a acquired skill.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2013 around 00:03

ashgromnies
Jun 19, 2004

by Lowtax


Thanks for the tips, Hollis.

Some friends and I are going to New Orleans the week of the 25th to spend Halloween there. We are staying in the French Quarter. What places should we make sure to try?

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


Dick and Jennies on Tchoupitalous (not sure how to spell that) , Jacques Mos , if you want the best barbecue on the gulf coats - Squeal BBQ. Definitely go to those first two the third if you want that.

Roast Beef Po Boys - Tracy's on Magazine street ( people will tell you Parasols, that's not true. See people bought Parasols and the cooks were just like gently caress it and took the recipes to Tracy's )

Verde Mart in the French Quarter - it's on Royal Street some of the best drat poboys in the world <--- GO HERE FOR SURE

Amazing Hot Dogs - Dat Dogs several places, Magazine and Freret St. Get the Crawfish Hot Dog topped traditional way not what you think. It's just amazing.


Pascal Manali - BBQ Shrimp New Orleans style - Best Oyster Bar in the City

Casamentos - If you don't go here then I don't think we can be friends ( May be closed check ahead of time they sometimes keep strange hours)

http://www.casamentosrestaurant.com/main/main.html

GO HERE GO HERE GO HERE and order the Chargrilled Oysters

You should also eat a Muffaletta

New Orleans also has some of the best PHO in the country as it has a very large Vietnamese population. I recommend Pho King in the Lost Love Lounge in the Marigny. Great "dive" bar with amazing food.


Want the best Deli Experience?

Stein's Deli - Amazing Deli on Magazine Street , just fantastic ( While there make sure to buy Arnaulds sauce to take home)

If you are in New Orleans on Halloween then go to All Ways Lounge. Seriously.

GO TO THE GROCERY STORE ROUSES ( also they have good food)

Buy RIVER ROAD SEASONING AS MUCH AS YOU CAN, it has mixes that are amazing for tons of New Orleans Dishes.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2013 around 00:52

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Thanks Hollis! Gonna link the post about roux in the OP. Good stuff.

Also if you wanna go a little more upscale while youre in NOLA have dinner at Tujaques. It's usually a prix fixe deal for $50-60 if I remember correctly but holy poo poo it is worth it. The lunch menu is more standard fare (stuff from the OP etc) and a little cheaper but also good. Splurging on a dinner there is worth it.

JaquesMos is the poo poo, glad to learn about Tracy's. If you see the huge line for beignets and coffe at cafe du monde go over and find Morning call, better stuff anyway. There's a big one in city park and the old one that they moved out of the quarter after it burned is near the Causeway.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


ashgromnies posted:

Thanks for the tips, Hollis.

Some friends and I are going to New Orleans the week of the 25th to spend Halloween there. We are staying in the French Quarter. What places should we make sure to try?

Port of call has wonderful burgers. Not Cajun though obviously.

I made chicken friccasse from the site in the op. 'Twas awesome

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


Believe it or not I forgot that you can in fact make vegetarian gumbo. It's made with vegetable oil as the roux and vegetable stock then just put a bunch of okra in it and add some tofu and whatever soybean "sausage" that you can find that has a smoke flavor added to it.

Also, Gumbo literally means Okra or Okra means Gumbo , so uh it's a key ingredient. Pretty much just put whatever "white" meat, and a sausage in it and crab or shrimp and it's gumbo. Squirrel meat or any fowl go well in gumbo. If you can't find andouille , substitute a smoked sausage , green onion sausage works as well.Forgot to add if you want a more seafoody flavor add half chicken stock half seafood stock.

Port of Call does have fantastic burgers.

For Jambalaya, here's crazy don't put rice in it, I've heard this as different names but most commonly coonass spaghetti. Basically instead of rice, get some bowtie pasta and make your Jambalaya with that instead of rice. Surprisingly very good.

I strongly advocate not cooking the chicken with the Jamabalaya, mix in everything but the chicken. Instead Smoke a chicken or go to a place that sells smoked chicken tear it up and then half way into the cooking process of the jambalaya dump the smoked chicken in there and finish cooking it. You will thank me.

Use a Pressure Cooker for Red Beans and Rice if you have it, it makes everything so much easier. Also whatever recipe was posted he used for red beans can be used for white beans. Just like Red Beans ,but with white beans.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2013 around 06:27

kiresays
Aug 14, 2012



SavTargaryen posted:

I just want to say that the red beans and rice recipe posted on the previous page is god drat amazing. Or at least, I'm pretty sure that it was. I ate maybe half a bowl right after it was finished - having made probably 10 bowls' worth, and when I woke up my roommate had consumed it all. So, uh, I guess mark of approval? I'm making another batch tonight that hopefully I'll actually get to eat more of.

Seconding this, made it and it was great. Made enough for lunch the whole week.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


I was gonna say, the only andouille I ever see around here is that grocery store pre-packaged poo poo. I've used it before, but I feel there are much much better options. Got a bunch of good Polish places nearby. A good smoked keilbasa would do the trick?

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That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

I've lived outside of LA a majority of the last 8 years so getting good andouille is always a challenge.

I've subbed in a good kielbasa for lots of things and it worked just fine. If you can find local sausage makers just get something that trends on the spicy / garlic heavy side and it will probably do well.

When I lived in Texas I had a guy who brought us several pounds of homemade pork and jalapeno sausage every month or so. I used this in gumbo and jambalaya and everyone loved it.

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