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OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


What makes "good" or "correct" andouille? I can't seem to find a straight answer anywhere besides "pork, smoked." Lots of people say chunky and non-homogenous with big chunks of fat (like sopresetta or salami is) but then I found out some big-shot old-school Louisiana chef swears by blending and milling to get a smooth, pate- or bologna-like homogenous texture.

What gives? What is andouille, what defines it? not even wikipedia is very clear beyond "pork, smoked." Is that it?

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Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


THE MACHO MAN posted:

I was gonna say, the only andouille I ever see around here is that grocery store pre-packaged poo poo. I've used it before, but I feel there are much much better options. Got a bunch of good Polish places nearby. A good smoked keilbasa would do the trick?

Andouille is smoked pork sausage or even beef, that has onion garlic and cayenne pepper or red pepper flakes mixed in with it. There are many types but yes basically it's smoked pork sausage. Get a mild smoked hot link if you can't find Andouille.


Smoked Hot Links works in a pinch if you can find those. Basically any spicy smoked sausage works. A reliable place to get good andouille sausage I've found is Whole Foods.

Just make sure the sausage does not contain fennel. This is important do not buy sausage that contains fennel and put it in gumbo, you just put breakfast sausage in your gumbo and it's disgusting. On it's own good not so much in gumbo.

You can honestly go crazy with sausages , Andouille isn't neccessary, Jalapeno Sausage, Rabbit or Duck Sausage etc.. I wouldn't use a sausage that had cheese in it that's about it.

Raw Sausage and Gumbo what you need to know:

Some sausage doesn't come cooked or smoked. If you use this type of sausage in your gumbo it can be very very chewy and nasty. In fact all the flavor in the sausage just leaks into the gumbo.

How to fix!

Smoke the sausage yourself. If you have a grill , you can bastardize a smoker, get some woodchips a low heat and put the sausage off of the grill. Cook for a very long time.

Don't have a grill?

That's okay.

This is a step by step guide to smoking sausage in your oven

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/893335

Use this method.

Again, if you use uncooked sausage in your gumbo it's going to taste really chewy and basically gross.

Can't Smoke in your oven? Have no options?

Cook it on the stove in butter with a little liquid smoke added to the pan. After the sausages have cooked let them cool. Cut them up and cook again.

Add them to the gumbo at the end.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2013 around 21:49

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Hollis posted:

Just make sure the sausage does not contain fennel. This is important do not buy sausage that contains fennel and put it in gumbo, you just put breakfast sausage in your gumbo and it's disgusting. On it's own good not so much in gumbo.

If I smoke some spicy Italian sausage, is the fennel in it going to gently caress up the works? Or is it just not a flavor natural to cajun/creole food? A local butcher has awesome and cheap spicy italian links.

e: though I guess I could also try to talk the butcher into making andouille...

ee: thanks for the info though! especially the part about smoked vs raw + liquid smoke being an important distinction.

OMGVBFLOL fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2013 around 23:28

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Good tip about the raw sausage Hollis, I almost never get them raw so never made any mention of it.


Agreeing with Hollis that the fennel just would taste weird in a gumbo. It's just not something that goes good in the profile. Great stuff for white gravy though.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


Breaky posted:



It should work just be sure to handle them as little as possible so you don't turn it into a pile of fish flakes.

Yeah, I ended up halving the oven time and it came rad.

I have to say though, I liked the Creole sauce better before I added Worchestershire. I might omit that in the future. Think I'll make the fricassee this weekend.

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

If you can get your hands on some Savoie's andouille, you're in good shape. I know some goons don't like to go with the most mainstream thing available, but it's still good sausage.

Failing that! As Hollis said, garlicly, spicy sausage will do great.

I'm also really lazy and missing easy-to-get white boudin.

The Southern Dandy fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 00:27

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


Hollis posted:

Also, if you use okra and Roux, you don't have to use Filet. You shouldn't use all three IE a combination of two of those, Okra and Roux or Okra and Filet , Or Filet and Roux (although that isn't gumbo). Filet, Okra and Roux are all thickening agents. Filet doesn't have a super pronounced flavor but you can tell if gumbo doesn't have it. Usually the Roux is going to have the strongest flavor.


File and roux would be a file gumbo.

Gumbo without okra is still gumbo. Yeah I get it that gumbo comes from some West African word for okra, but definitions of things change. Also, a gumbo with okra and file without roux? I would say that THAT isn't gumbo.

I wouldn't imagine going to Lafayette/Acadia/St. Landry/etc. parish and telling some coon-asses that their pot of gumbo without okra isn't gumbo.

I do agree with not mixing file and okra. I can only imagine how weird that would be.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


bolo yeung posted:

File and roux would be a file gumbo.

Gumbo without okra is still gumbo. Yeah I get it that gumbo comes from some West African word for okra, but definitions of things change. Also, a gumbo with okra and file without roux? I would say that THAT isn't gumbo.

I wouldn't imagine going to Lafayette/Acadia/St. Landry/etc. parish and telling some coon-asses that their pot of gumbo without okra isn't gumbo.

I do agree with not mixing file and okra. I can only imagine how weird that would be.

Them's fightin words. (It's a joke but yeah seriously lots of people have had the Gumbo isn't gumbo without Okra argument for like ever in the south, it's best not brought up in polite company.) I recommend Johnsonville Andouille sausage it seems pretty popular and readily available it seems. I can get it up here in Chicago.


It's time to put forth another signature dishes of Louisiana. The Meat Pie it's more a northern pride thing, but it still appears in southern Louisiana.

The meat pie is most famous in Natchitoches ( NAK EH DOSH), the town is famous because of the movie Steel Magnolias, it's meat pies, and old slave plantations.

Here's how you make it

The short version : It's biscuit dough, that is stuffed with usually pork, beef, peppers and deep fried. They are incredibly good.


Here's a recipe:

Make Biscuit Dough (Top Secret Recipe share with no one)

Please note this biscuit recipe is just a rough recipe I honestly couldn't give you the real measurements as it's made by eye and that's how I learned it. I figure this is the right proportion. It's a common thing in southern cooking to cook by eye.

5 cups flour, plus extra plus some morefor dusting
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 pound cold butter, cut up small
1/2 to 3/4s cup of Seven Up

Like I said this is all by eye, it should be a doughy ball and not to wet.

I'm going to tell you the southern method for mixing this up but if you have some other way make it that way.

Take some Cellophane and put it on your table then pour the flour on top of it, make a "well" in the center of the flour. Put in the butter. Put in the Seven up. Start "folding".

Folding means exactly that you "fold" the flour. Stick your hand and get some dry flour and plop it on top of the well, spread it out again and do it again and again. And again. And again forming a lopsided ball. This should take about 20 to 25 minutes and you'll eventually have your ball of dough. Set it aside with a damp cloth over it, I've never made biscuits any other way.

This should make like 16 to 20 meat pies , your mileage may vary. There is a step further on that I will explain.


Or you know use a mixer to make the biscuits or go to the drat store and buy biscuit dough because making biscuits that way is hard as gently caress. Just buy a brand that is bot butter flavoured or buttermilk. Just regular plain biscuit dough.


MEAT!!!

Any red meat is fine plus pork (rabbit can be substituted for pork, so can the following animals, alligator, frog). Just don't use fish or fowl and you're good. My favourite is venison and pork.

Again this by eye , honestly I know what goes in it but I always just shake it in the meat and figure this is probably the recipe. Just use your judgement

1lb of Ground Red Meat
1lb of Ground Pork
1 to 2 bellpeppers chopped
1 Yellow Onion chopped
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons Paprika ( smoked or spicy hungarian, which is delicious can be used)
1 to 2 tablespoons of Ground Black Pepper
1 to 2 table spoons of Salt
A pinch to a half a teaspoon of Cayenne Pepper
A Dash to a teaspoon of Worchester sauce
A dash to a teaspoon of dried thyme
Some crushed up bay leaves that you throw in the garbage after you crush them because seriously you're not going to taste it.
1 diced Tomato
1 egg
a little flour

Mix all of that up really well. A good way to tell if it's spicey and flavorful is to get a paper towel. Then put your head over the bowl and smell if it kind of tickles your throat and nose it's good. Sneeze into the paper towel if necessary.

Set that aside

Get your meat pie biscuit dough.

Flatten it out.

Flatten out some more. You don't want this paper thin, I would say a good rule of thumb on thickness would be like two butter knives blades pressed together thick. Again it's by eye sorry. Now cut a circle in it. I use a a medium size can of tomatoes I turned into a biscuit cutter, but I'd say the circle should be probably 6 to 7 inches across.



Now here is where the bullshit starts:

Some people will tell you to cook all of that meat mixture up and then add it to the dough then cook the meat pie. Those people are evil and wrong. I don't care who told you to do that don't you cook that meat before you spoon it into the meat pie. You'll find out why very soon.


So Spoon like two tablespoons in the center of the meat pie, wet the edges of the meat pie and then fold it over and press lightly down on it with a fork. Congratulations you just made a coonass half moon dumpling.

If you need more biscuit dough make it. Just take the biscuit dough left overs and mix it up again into a ball and reflatten it, you may need to add some more water if it's dry.

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees.


Heat a deep fryer pot with oil (important has to be a deep fryer pot) to 350 degrees. Fry them till their slightly golden brown usually 12 to 14 minutes, (if you keep getting "raw" meat your packing them too much, your meat pies shouldn't be more than half a inch to 3/4s of a inch thick). Now take them out and let them drain drain drain drain drain drain. In fact drain them until they are almost warm.

Optional : While they're still hot sprinkle Tony's on there.

Keep them warm in the oven on a roasting wire rack to make them drain more. No one likes a mouthful of oil.

The following sauce can be served with it.

Mayo w/ Siracha sauce

Or my favourite : Sauce

Sauce Recipe:

Equal Parts Ketchum, Mayo
Add Worchester sauce to the mayo before mixing the may should be slightly brown.
Add some ground pepper

That's it. I don't know where the hell this sauce comes from but for some reason it's super common at crawfish bowls and the "secret" sauce at a bunch of restaurants in the south.

A note on why that's so drat complicated

Southern or Cajun food has a fuckload of steps, almost all of it does. Why? Because that's what makes it good not just the food itself but the effort that went into it.

All those steps are really important and you should try and follow them. Another thing. gently caress around, seriously southern cooking is all about making it yours. No ones gumbo is exactly the same. No ones Jambalaya is the same. You want to add something to it do that.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 03:07

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

7-Up in biscuit dough? For a meat pie?! That's... interesting. I won't knock it until I've tried it, but why 7-Up?

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


I don't know that is what my grandmother used in her biscuits, it just makes them taste better and it makes the dough expand more so they're just uh better. Have no idea why it makes them fluffier and better but that's what my grandmother used though.

Why does my grandmother insist on rubbing her hand with a piece of cut potato and burying in the yard when she makes a big dinner. gently caress if I know but if I have a yard and I'm making a big dinner I cut a potato rub my hand and bury it in the yard.

Some things in southern cooking are answered by just " Don't know, that's just how it's done".

It doesn't make it taste lemony, you'd think it would have some sort of lemon lime flavor but they don't.

edit:

Forgot to add if you make too many meat pies its perfectly okay to freeze them, just remember that if you freeze them it's best to let them thaw for a bit before cooking them in a deep fryer unless you want to have exploded grease in your kitchen.

Also that's just what she uses for the meat pie biscuit dough. The biscuits she makes different but still has seven up in it.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 04:12

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Oh gently caress yes meat pies

My grandparents lived in Alexandria and had farmland all over even up past Natchitoches. Grandpa would always take us to Lasyones on the way back for meat pies. Those were so freakin good. Nice call on adding that to the thread. Its a north Louisiana thing but it's awesome.

That Works fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 12:08

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


Oh cool yeah my family is originally from Pineville and Rapides parish, I grew up further north when I was younger in Colfax and Rock Hill during the summers so meat pies were pretty common.

BBQ Shrimp New Orleans Style w/ Grits :

You have to buy this

https://www.fiestaspices.com/index....shrimpseasoning

That is BBQ shrimp seasoning. Its required to make this but once you order it and get it home you are good. Buy that brand. Do not buy another brand of BBQ shrimp seasoning, sorry that is your only option for BBQ shrimp seasoning that is New Orleans style as making BBQ mix is drat hard and I don't even attempt it.

Go to the store or fish market and buy Shrimp with shells and heads on them

The seasoning box you got will tell you how much shrimp to buy. Usually a pound per batch always go with a little less shrimp than is called for so you'll have a stronger flavor.

I always clean my shrimp I don't like shrimp poop!

That's okay theres a easy way to clean that shrimp and still leave heads and shells on in fact you want to cook it this way. Take a serrated knife and while holding the shrimp between your thumb and index cut the shell and into the shrimp itself to get the top vein. It's important to do this so that the sauce get's in the shell but the shell is still on there. If you have shrimp that's got a lot of whiskers cut those off.

Leave the shell and the head on the goddamn shrimp. Again leave the shell and the head on the goddamn shrimp. If you cook that without the head and shell it's going to taste bad. I don't know why.



When you cook these it's going to tell you to add butter and then worchester sauce , but also add a few cloves of garlic to that batch as well. The more garlic you add the spicier it's going to be.

Now for the grits

Instant Grits are fine if you want, here's what you do though.

Make the Grits with Seafood Stock. You should have a good amount of grits you want to have enough to slather on the plate but not like excessively.

That's it. That's the whole recipe make the grits with seafood stock.

After you cook the shrimp and it's ready, put your grits on the plate and spread it around. Then put the shrimp and some sauce on top of the grits. Have some french bread at hand for extra sauce. Also, have a lot of napkins and papers towels for peeling the shrimp.

The proper way to eat this is to peel the shrimp , eat them, suck the heads too! then use the french bread to mop up the mixture of grits and sauce left on the plate, but it's fine just as long as you eat this.

If you buy fighting shrimp do not suck the heads Fighting Shrimp have a little spike on the top of their head and it is often a little serrated. Don't suck on that. Fighting Shrimp I think are Vietnamese region shrimp but you can tell them pretty easily apart from regular shrimp. You can suck the head but if you do it fast you are going to end up with some blood in your mouth.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2013 around 14:30

Mushika
Dec 22, 2010



Grimey Drawer

The temperature plummeted to 70 degrees yesterday (virtually winter!), so it was obviously time to make chicken and sausage gumbo! It was raining just a bit and I was exhausted from working all day so I decided to use what I had rather than ride the motorcycle to the store. This meant carrots instead of celery, though celery seed helped a bit while stewing, and smoked turkey sausage instead of andouille. Blasphemy, I know, but while I normally make a dark-ish red roux for my gumbo, I decided to go a bit more blonde for the more delicate flavor of the turkey sausage. It worked surprisingly well. The okra was frozen and store bought, so not optimal, but still worked. I normally have either fresh or stewed okra grown and canned by family. I have some leftover shrimp in the freezer from a wedding in Algiers Point last week and some crab, so I think on my next day off or so I'll do a more creole-style seafood gumbo. I haven't made a green gumbo in years, so I think I'm going to give that a try in the near future as well.

Breaky posted:

Oh gently caress yes meat pies

My grandparents lived in Alexandria and had farmland all over even up past Natchitoches. Grandpa would always take us to Lasyones on the way back for meat pies. Those were so freakin good. Nice call on adding that to the thread. Its a north Louisiana thing but it's awesome.

While I'm not a Natchitoches meat pie aficionado, my family has for many years had a tradition of stopping at the same divey spot in Many for meat pies or crawfish pies while on the way to see my grandmother's family near Shreveport. The last time I was up that way was when my grandmother passed away, and my brother and I shared a hotel room near Minden for the funeral. We hadn't seen each other in several years since he'd moved to Iowa, and even though we were physically and mentally drained from the all-day wake, we wanted to catch up that night. So my brother walks across the street to the gas station to buy beer, but comes back with two Yoo-Hoos. I've lived in Louisiana my entire life and, until that point, I'd had no idea there were dry parishes.

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

Hollis posted:

Oh cool yeah my family is originally from Pineville and Rapides parish, I grew up further north when I was younger in Colfax and Rock Hill during the summers so meat pies were pretty common.

I'm from Pineville

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

The Southern Dandy posted:

I'm from Pineville

I have family in Pineville...

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


The Southern Dandy posted:

I'm from Pineville

Cool, what year did you go to Pineville High?

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

Hollis posted:

Cool, what year did you go to Pineville High?

I'm an oldie, graduated in '91.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


You graduated with my sister then. We probably know each other. SA is such a strange place sometimes. Did you ever go to Major League Cards and Comics over on HWY 28? My family went to Brother Roberts church the Pentecostal one.

Anyway yea weird.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Oct 23, 2013 around 03:29

The Southern Dandy
Jun 15, 2010

ASK ME ABOUT MY RADLEY-WALTERS' MEDAL

Is that medal for being the most intolerable poster in a thread about Warhammer 40.000 novels? Because if it is, you sure blew the competition out of the water, son.

Hollis posted:

You graduated with my sister then. We probably know each other. SA is such a strange place sometimes. Did you ever go to Major League Cards and Comics over on HWY 28? My family went to Brother Roberts church the Pentecostal one.

Anyway yea weird.

I went in and bought some Magic cards there back in the 90s, yeah. Also my parents weren't wild-eyed Pentecostals, we're god-fearing Episcopals that beat y'all to Picadilly every Sunday!

In all seriousness, nice to meet some Pinevillians on SA, no matter what your stripe.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


Nothing says "Let's go have a good family dinner" than Piccadilly. Cool yeah I was one of the MAgic dorks there all through highschool.

Small world.

ashgromnies
Jun 19, 2004

by Lowtax


THE MACHO MAN posted:

Port of call has wonderful burgers. Not Cajun though obviously.

I made chicken friccasse from the site in the op. 'Twas awesome

Port Of Call is right down the street for me -- I'm at Esplanade and Royal. Verti Mart is loving awesome. Creole Chicken sandwich was the perfect 4 AM food.

Thank you guys so much. I'm going to be here til Saturday if anyone wants a drink or some food.

Edit: also maybe a little hoighty toighty but a friend brought us to Drago's for charbroiled oysters -- amazing

ashgromnies fucked around with this message at Oct 30, 2013 around 09:08

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


So I'm doing the gumbo on page 1 today. Couldn't find dungess crab, and the only other options were snow or king and gently caress that poo poo. The store I went to did have crawfish on sale, so I got those. How exactly should I be using these? They're still in the shell.

NLJP
Aug 26, 2004




Sweet, in my quest to find a substitute for Andouille here in London I went to buy some Sucuk at the local lebanese shop and lo and behold they also had Chrystal hot sauce. So if this sucuk works out I'll make some black beans on rice or jambalaya next week.

First foray into cajun cooking so should be fun I hope. Thanks for the thread!

edit: just tasted the Chrystal. Not entirely unlike tabasco, pretty mild. Not bad.

NLJP fucked around with this message at Nov 10, 2013 around 14:00

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



I have not made shrimp or crayfish etoufee in years, about the time a few local shops stopped stocking crystal Going on a quest for the one true sauce and whipping up another batch before Thanksgiving. I should probably make my first gumbo before Christmas while I am at it.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Crystal is great, I've also lived through droughts where I was in places that did not have it. It's not like, magically irreplaceable if you can't find it so don't let it hold up a recipe.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Cayenne powder and white vinegar got me through a drought without my beloved egg condiment Tabasco (what the gently caress podunk grocery store doesn't carry tabasco, loving rural Colorado).

LeBeau
Apr 8, 2010


Howdy there~

Wouldja look at that? My second post ever!

Had to come out of my perpetual silence though, this is an awesome thread. Just found myself a new apartment and decided to start learning how to cook, finally, and I just tried the OP's jumbalaya... drat good! Thanks so much! You can bet I'll be trying the rest of these.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

++Threadnaught++


THE MACHO MAN posted:

So I'm doing the gumbo on page 1 today. Couldn't find dungess crab, and the only other options were snow or king and gently caress that poo poo. The store I went to did have crawfish on sale, so I got those. How exactly should I be using these? They're still in the shell.

I hope you found out how to use these, but if you want to know crawfish are usually cooked in crab or shrimp boil or you can just cook them like a mini me lobster.

If you are using them in gumbo just peel the tail and get the tail meat out, you have to cook them first.

Speaking of gumbo, it's gotten cold in Chicago, I've got a duck defrosting in the fridge. Gonna make some duck and sausage gumbo. Probably stop by China Town or Little Asia and get a crab to throw in there along with some shrimp. Crab's just for flavor really.

I may have mentioned this but if you are making Red Beans and Rice make them in a pressure cooker if you have one.

GEEKABALL
May 30, 2011

Throw out your hands!!
Stick out your tush!!
Hands on your hips
Give them a push!!


Fun Shoe

Just finishing up some leftover Daube from Mandina's. I'd never even heard of this stuff before, but it is outrageously delicious. Kind of a Swiss steak on steroids, except they use brisket. Does anyone have a recipe for this?
I'm going to try to find Casamento's tonight. I've been in New Orleans for four days now and I feel like I've gained 10 pounds

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

GEEKABALL posted:

Just finishing up some leftover Daube from Mandina's. I'd never even heard of this stuff before, but it is outrageously delicious. Kind of a Swiss steak on steroids, except they use brisket. Does anyone have a recipe for this?
I'm going to try to find Casamento's tonight. I've been in New Orleans for four days now and I feel like I've gained 10 pounds

I've been meaning to make the one from this recipe: http://www.nolacuisine.com/2012/09/...-creole-recipe/

I haven't gotten around to it though so I can't vouch for it yet. I've used that same site for other recipes though and they have performed well.

Mr.Fuzzywig
Dec 13, 2006
I play too much Supcom

I normally dont post alltogether too much in this subforum. But these pictures of jumbo are irresistible,

We just got a crockpot at our apartment and i have been aching to try it out and if this aint the perfect thing i dont know what is.

Shbobdb
Dec 16, 2010

by Smythe


I was hoping to make some crab etouffee, Any good recipes? I can buy the Crystal from the Korean grocer but I'd like some more guidance.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Shbobdb posted:

I was hoping to make some crab etouffee, Any good recipes? I can buy the Crystal from the Korean grocer but I'd like some more guidance.

Follow a crawfish or shrimp etoufee recipe honestly. If you are buying the crabmeat without the shells then you'll want to make some sort of shellfish stock if you can. Otherwise sub in chicken stock but I would only do that if you have no options.

Shbobdb
Dec 16, 2010

by Smythe


It will be a live crab, so I'll have the shell

So, what is a good shellfish recipe? I could google some random stuff, but I never know how good those will be.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Shbobdb posted:

It will be a live crab, so I'll have the shell

So, what is a good shellfish recipe? I could google some random stuff, but I never know how good those will be.

http://www.nolacuisine.com/2006/12/...touffee-recipe/
http://www.nolacuisine.com/2009/07/...touffee-recipe/

Either of those are a good start. The recipes are pretty flexible so taste it as you go and change seasonings etc accordingly.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Fo3 posted:

I don't know if they first mix list is authentic, but I'm totally using 2t of that spice mix in the beans and rice I'm cooking right now, (along with some cumin, a bay leaf and extra chilli). E: Giving it a try with smoked paprika as a veg beans and rice needs all the help it can get.

Just spotted this, but with vegetarian dishes, especially ones that would typically get meat stock, butter is your good friend who is here to help. I'm too broke to afford meat right now, but a tablespoon of butter per 1/2c of dry beans makes a big difference, not just with flavor, but with texture too. Rice gets a lot less, more like a teaspoon per 1/2c dry.

Vegetable stock lacks the gelatin of simmered bones, but a little cornstarch thickens it up nice. Shouldn't be needed for rice or gumbo, but with beans or soup it can make a big difference.

Mushika
Dec 22, 2010



Grimey Drawer

So apparently what I've had as "green gumbo" isn't exactly that. Years ago, when I was vegetarian, some friends and I would make "green gumbo" by starting a gumbo the traditional way with a roux, trinity, maybe some garlic, and then incorporating the stock (vegetable at the time). After that got well and going, we'd chop up a bunch of turnip, collard, and/or mustard greens and stew them until just tender. A delicious stew of greens to be sure, but recently I've discovered that was not quite a gumbo z'herbes. Seems like a green gumbo has a much larger amount and variety of greens, and tends to be more blended. Most pictures I've seen makes it look comparable to an Indian saag.

It's not something I've seen in restaurants that I've been to, though I guess I could try asking for it off-menu during Lent. I've looked up recipes and it looks delicious, but I was wondering if any south Louisiana goons have a favorite recipe or maybe a certain preparation their family typically uses.

e: A friend told me to try Dooky Chase, has anyone tried theirs?

Mushika fucked around with this message at Nov 26, 2013 around 21:48

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Mushika posted:

So apparently what I've had as "green gumbo" isn't exactly that. Years ago, when I was vegetarian, some friends and I would make "green gumbo" by starting a gumbo the traditional way with a roux, trinity, maybe some garlic, and then incorporating the stock (vegetable at the time). After that got well and going, we'd chop up a bunch of turnip, collard, and/or mustard greens and stew them until just tender. A delicious stew of greens to be sure, but recently I've discovered that was not quite a gumbo z'herbes. Seems like a green gumbo has a much larger amount and variety of greens, and tends to be more blended. Most pictures I've seen makes it look comparable to an Indian saag.

It's not something I've seen in restaurants that I've been to, though I guess I could try asking for it off-menu during Lent. I've looked up recipes and it looks delicious, but I was wondering if any south Louisiana goons have a favorite recipe or maybe a certain preparation their family typically uses.

e: A friend told me to try Dooky Chase, has anyone tried theirs?

This sounds amazing. I love saag and southern greens both. If you find a recipe, please post it.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Mushika posted:

So apparently what I've had as "green gumbo" isn't exactly that. Years ago, when I was vegetarian, some friends and I would make "green gumbo" by starting a gumbo the traditional way with a roux, trinity, maybe some garlic, and then incorporating the stock (vegetable at the time). After that got well and going, we'd chop up a bunch of turnip, collard, and/or mustard greens and stew them until just tender. A delicious stew of greens to be sure, but recently I've discovered that was not quite a gumbo z'herbes. Seems like a green gumbo has a much larger amount and variety of greens, and tends to be more blended. Most pictures I've seen makes it look comparable to an Indian saag.

It's not something I've seen in restaurants that I've been to, though I guess I could try asking for it off-menu during Lent. I've looked up recipes and it looks delicious, but I was wondering if any south Louisiana goons have a favorite recipe or maybe a certain preparation their family typically uses.

e: A friend told me to try Dooky Chase, has anyone tried theirs?

Can't say I've heard of one but that sounds really good. If you find something post it back in here!

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Hecuba
Jul 20, 2005
"You shouldn't have gone murderin' people with a hatchet, that's no occupation for a gentleman."

Gumbo z'herbes is a real treat this time of year lovely and warming, and healthy(ish, depending on variety and amount of sausage used) against the onslaught of holiday food.

Non-vegetarians want to start by acquiring a large meaty ham bone, tasso/andouille/your favorite hard sausage, and/or some pickle meat. Sautee the sausage at the bottom of a large pot until the fat renders, then remove and add some chopped onion and garlic. When they're translucent, add roughly as much flour as fat remaining in the pan, stir and let it hang out til everything turns a nice toasty brown. (You're not going for dark chocolate color here think cappuccino.) Slice up all the greens into thin confetti strips and toss em into a pot along with a couple bay leaves, the hambone and pickle meat. Add just enough water to cover and stew, adding water as necessary, until the greens are nicely soft and dark, and all the meat has fallen off the hambone. You can start boiling the bone ahead of time to get all that delicious collagen out but I'm lazy and usually forget. Stir in the roux and sausage, plus a teaspoon or so each of file powder and cayenne, then simmer until it thickens up. Taste for seasoning (the meat will have made it pretty salty). Whatever amount of pepper you have in there already, add five more cranks. Fish out the bay leaves and serve over lots of steamed white rice. You want the final product to be soupy and loose, but not swimming in broth.

I believe Ms. Chase herself recommends boiling the pickle meat separately and adding in its water spoonful by spoonful to the main pot to avoid oversalting, but I've never thought the salt level was overwhelming doing it this way. Also, again: lazy.

This wouldn't be too hard to vegetarianize, I bet — just skip the meat components (duh) and make the roux with your favorite rich fat like butter or ghee. My grandma is turning over in her grave at the thought, but a combo of coconut and olive oil might do the trick for vegans. Make sure to add a splash of liquid smoke or something along those lines to make up for the lack of sausage.

Fun gumbo z'herbes fact: make sure that you use an odd number of types of greens (9 is traditional) or else it's terrible luck.

Hecuba fucked around with this message at Dec 7, 2013 around 15:57

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