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Democratic Pirate
Feb 17, 2010



I didnít get pictures (and they wouldnít have turned out well anyway), but I made the daube recipe from back in the thread and it was amazing. I threw in a few serranos on top of the cayenne and spicy tony chachereís and it had a nice level of heat.

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I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

And what do I do with crawfish? Itís crawfish season and the whole suck the heads thing has always grossed me out and I donít love real spicy stuff anyway. Are crawfish tails pretty much interchangeable with shrimp?

Crawfish boudin is hella tasty and Iíd make some right now if my mother didnít hate crawfish.

(Iíll probably make some anyway, I just wonít give her any)

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What yíall been getting fat on for Mardi Gras?


And what do I do with crawfish? Itís crawfish season and the whole suck the heads thing has always grossed me out and I donít love real spicy stuff anyway. Are crawfish tails pretty much interchangeable with shrimp?

They definitely can be. Stock made from the shells and using the meat along with sausage in an etoufee is always a hit. You can also make crawfish monica which is really good but very rich.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




That Works posted:

You can also make crawfish monica which is really good but very rich.

Fuuuuuuck Iím on a diet and I regret clicking that.

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

What yíall been getting fat on for Mardi Gras?

Not what you wanted to see, but:



(also massive amounts of king cake and beer)

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


ulmont posted:

Not what you wanted to see, but:



(also massive amounts of king cake and beer)

Nice

Today was champagne, beer, jambalaya, beer, king cake, moon pies, champagne, shrimp scampi for a light dinner, chocolate cake, king cake, rum. More parades tomorrow, looking forward to the fried chicken.

dy.
Dec 6, 2003



Hosting a Mardi Gras dinner this weekend and figured I'd post my recipe for the chicken and sausage jambalaya I always make. I am, sadly, not cajun/creole, but this is good! It consistently gets high marks from Louisiana folk. The recipe is adapted from John Besh's.

Basically the important thing about this recipe is to develop a nice base of rendered pork fat, and then cook all the stuff in that pork fat.

Ingredients

1/2 pound salt pork, diced into lardons (or use pancetta or bacon or whatever)
3/4 lb ground bulk sausage (I use Hot Italian or Lousiana Hot Link from Whole Foods)
1lb-ish bone-in, skin on chicken thighs, usually 4-5 thighs. Season well, but be careful of too much salt.
2-4 Andouille Sausages, sliced into discs (I usually buy the precooked/cured kind)
1 large Onion (diced)
2 Bell Peppers (seeded and diced)
3 stalks Celery (diced)
4 Garlic Cloves (minced)
2-3 carrots, cut into discs (this is not traditional but I like it)
2 cups Louisiana White Rice, washed
1 teaspoon dried Thyme
2 dried Bay Leaves
1.5 tablespoon Smoked Paprika
1 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper (can omit if using spicy sausage)
1 tablespoon Celery Salt
Cajun seasoning to taste
1 can DOP tomatoes, crushed by hand
2 cups chicken stock (see Optional Smoky Chicken Stock step)
1 bunch Green Onions (chopped), separate whites and greens

Optional Smoky Chicken Stock
This is a way to enrich your standard storebought chicken stock with some great smoky flavor and gelatin. It's particularly good as a base for white beans too.

1. Get some storebought chicken stock
2. Get one of those smoked turkey wings (or legs work fine to)
3. Throw the wing in the stock and simmer for a couple hours or pressure cook it or something
4. The meat usually comes out a bit tough, without a lot of flavor. Give your pet a treat, or throw it in something, I don't know.

Preparation
If you want to make a day ahead, you can do everything except add the rice, then just let it cool and throw everything in the fridge. Just bring back to a boil and add the rice when ready, it works great!

1. Get a large, heavy-bottomed dutch oven. I used enameled cast iron. Get it smoking hot and brown the sausage. If it's gray, not brown, throw it away and go to Popeye's instead. Remove the sausage to a separate bowl but leave the fat.
2. Turn the heat down to low-medium, throw your salt pork (or other fatty pork thing) in there and cook until the fat renders out and it's a bit crispy. At this point you should have some lardons floating around in a tub of pork fat. This is good. Remove the salt pork, keep the fat.
3. Crank that heat back up and brown your chicken thighs all up in that fat, skin-side down, until it is golden brown. Note that they just need to be browned, not cooked all the way through. Usually takes like 5-6 minutes. Flip and brown the other side for 3-4 minutes. Remove chicken to separate plate.
3.5 I forgot the Andouille part, so add that in, already sliced, and cook until slightly crispy and browned. Remove when done.
4. In front of you will be hot pool of more fat than you typically consume in a month. Decide how far you are willing to go with this, and maybe remove some if you get cold feet (don't pour it in the sink dummy).
5. Turn the head down to medium-ish and throw in all of your ground spices (everything but bay leaves). Give it a quick stir for like 10 seconds, then add onions. Once they start to turn slightly translucent, add celery, green pepper, carrots, and garlic. Cook this stuff for like 5 minutes, stirring often, until it starts to soften a bit.
6. Add all of your meats back in. Turn the heat to med-high and add your liquids (chicken stock and tomatoes). Bring to a boil, turn down to a simmer, let everything get friendly for ~20 minutes. This is mainly to ensure that the chicken is thoroughly cooked.
7. Bring back to a hard boil. Add the rice, cover, reduce to low heat, and let simmer. After 15 minutes turn the heat off, open the lid, throw in green bits of green onion and quickly give it a stir. Put the lid back on and wait 10 minutes or until the rice absorbs most of the moisture. If it's a bit wet, just put the lid on and wait, it will absorb.
8. When ready to serve, pull out the chicken thighs, take the skins off, shred the meat, and put it back in. Enjoy.

dy. fucked around with this message at Mar 5, 2019 around 22:17

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

I want to be like Grace Kelly.

Y'all have any favorite cajun/creole cookbooks? I have this https://www.amazon.com/Leon-Galatoi...ay&sr=8-2-spell and like it very much. I never would have thought to put Worcestershire sauce and red wine vinegar in my trout meuniere, but now I do and its great. Most recipes start with several tablespoons/cups of clarified butter, and as my dad says, you could dip your belt in clarified butter and it would be delicious. I'd love any other suggestions to broaden my horizons, especially with more Cajun stuff.

The_Doctor
Mar 29, 2007

"The entire history of this incarnation is one of temporal orbits, retcons, paradoxes, parallel time lines, reiterations, and divergences. How anyone can make head or tail of all this chaos, I don't know."


River Road Recipes is my go-to, although some of them are a little dated now, and others seem to depend on you feeding about 50 people per sitting.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Y'all have any favorite cajun/creole cookbooks? I have this https://www.amazon.com/Leon-Galatoi...ay&sr=8-2-spell and like it very much. I never would have thought to put Worcestershire sauce and red wine vinegar in my trout meuniere, but now I do and its great. Most recipes start with several tablespoons/cups of clarified butter, and as my dad says, you could dip your belt in clarified butter and it would be delicious. I'd love any other suggestions to broaden my horizons, especially with more Cajun stuff.

Folse's Encyclopedia is the best all around book for breadth and depth. Plenty of recipes to work with and it's a beautiful book. Not sure if its in print anymore. He has a few other books that are also very nice and have some duplication of recipes, but this one is the bible.

https://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia...e/dp/0970445717

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




I have a couple Paul Prudhomme books (Louisiana Kitchen and Fork in the Road) and Iím looking to get at least a couple more.

Post more Cajun/Creole cookbooks.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Y'all have any favorite cajun/creole cookbooks? I have this https://www.amazon.com/Leon-Galatoi...ay&sr=8-2-spell and like it very much. I never would have thought to put Worcestershire sauce and red wine vinegar in my trout meuniere, but now I do and its great. Most recipes start with several tablespoons/cups of clarified butter, and as my dad says, you could dip your belt in clarified butter and it would be delicious. I'd love any other suggestions to broaden my horizons, especially with more Cajun stuff.

The_Doctor posted:

River Road Recipes is my go-to, although some of them are a little dated now, and others seem to depend on you feeding about 50 people per sitting.

Phil Moscowitz posted:

Folse's Encyclopedia is the best all around book for breadth and depth. Plenty of recipes to work with and it's a beautiful book. Not sure if its in print anymore. He has a few other books that are also very nice and have some duplication of recipes, but this one is the bible.

https://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia...e/dp/0970445717

None of these come in Kindle.

eke out
Feb 24, 2013



highly recommend Mary Land's "Louisiana Cookery," which is technically a cookbook but really more of a crazy documentary of turn-of-the-20th-century louisiana food and dining culture (first published in like 1954)

it would be useful if you need to know how to cook an owl versus how to cook a raven, though

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


Gonna berl some crawfish today. Two sacks, probably about 80lbs or so. $2.45/lb which is kind of expensive but not too bad relatively speaking. Iíll post some pics later.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

The Picayune cookbook is from like 1905 but the recipes hold up well barring a few odd ingredients here and there. Also second Prudhommes Louisiana Kitchen and Justin Wilson's cookbook which I forget the name of.

Mushika
Dec 22, 2010



Grimey Drawer

Phil Moscowitz posted:

Folse's Encyclopedia is the best all around book for breadth and depth. Plenty of recipes to work with and it's a beautiful book. Not sure if its in print anymore. He has a few other books that are also very nice and have some duplication of recipes, but this one is the bible.

https://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia...e/dp/0970445717

I'm going to have to second this. I've always had mixed feelings about John Folse as a personality, but his encyclopedia is a must have. The recipes are good, but the history and photography are excellent. I've flipped through his wild game book and it looked great as well, but Folse's books don't run cheap.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Mushika posted:

I'm going to have to second this. I've always had mixed feelings about John Folse as a personality, but his encyclopedia is a must have. The recipes are good, but the history and photography are excellent. I've flipped through his wild game book and it looked great as well, but Folse's books don't run cheap.

I actually don't have this. Need to pick it up

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


Crawfish boil yesterday.



I stole the green bean idea from Ultmont's post up there. They were a great addition and well-received!



There were some big guys in there, looked like langoustines. Beer can for scale.




Leftovers used for home fries and omelettes this morning.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

I hadn't had green beans in a boil. I bet that's drat good.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

I want to be like Grace Kelly.

A friend of mine ran out of ice at a party in college and used frozen green beans instead. Went surprisingly well with a gin and tonic.

My Justin Wilson cookbook came yesterday-very excited to explore it.

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Phil Moscowitz posted:

I stole the green bean idea from Ultmont's post up there. They were a great addition and well-received!

That Works posted:

I hadn't had green beans in a boil. I bet that's drat good.

It is. Works out very well.

Phil, your boil looks amazing. Well done!

Mushika
Dec 22, 2010



Grimey Drawer

Green beans in a crawfish boil? Why have I never heard about/thought of this before this thread?

Also, I love sausage in a boil, but mainly to save to brown up later for a hot sausage pony.

e: The app corrected "po' boy" to "pony" but Hot Sausage Pony sounds like a great username, so I'm leaving it.

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007

Real bullets mess up how cool this thing looks.

-Blade




Never done green beans but I have done asparagus in a boil. It also works very well.

Bluedeanie
Jul 20, 2008

It's no longer a blue world, Max. Where could we go?



Would like to thank liquid communism for directing me to the serious eats gumbo recipe in the simple questions thread, it was absolutely delicious and I think evem better reheated the next day. Bon!

Comb Your Beard
Sep 28, 2007

Chillin' like a villian.

Was watching beat Bobby Flay and the chef challenged him on Chicken Gumbo and won, pretty rare for a challenger to win. She put potato salad made with creole mustard right in the bowl. Otherwise mostly traditional recipe. Weird choice but could be good. I think that would be fun to have on the side.

Bobby did a grab-bag of different techniques, blackened chicken, deep fried okra, dirty rice. I often like his approach but not here.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


Gumbo is busy enough. Dirty rice, blackening, etc. just confuse things.

kloa
Feb 14, 2007



Iíve always put a blob of potato salad in my bowl with the rice and gumbo. May be a regional thing.

Also crumble a bunch of club crackers in it too.

The_Doctor
Mar 29, 2007

"The entire history of this incarnation is one of temporal orbits, retcons, paradoxes, parallel time lines, reiterations, and divergences. How anyone can make head or tail of all this chaos, I don't know."


Comb Your Beard posted:

Was watching beat Bobby Flay and the chef challenged him on Chicken Gumbo and won, pretty rare for a challenger to win.

I donít know about that. Any time he has to do some regional/cultural dish, he loses.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


The_Doctor posted:

I donít know about that. Any time he has to do some regional/cultural dish, he loses.

This was Poppy Tooker I think right?

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



Comb Your Beard posted:

Was watching beat Bobby Flay and the chef challenged him on Chicken Gumbo and won, pretty rare for a challenger to win. She put potato salad made with creole mustard right in the bowl. Otherwise mostly traditional recipe.

That is actually a regional variation, I think in Southern LA mostly. So also traditional.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007


Green Beans go great in a crawfish boil their pretty common I guess with my family? I dunno my family does cauliflower, green beans , corn , potatoes.

eke out
Feb 24, 2013



Crusty Nutsack posted:

That is actually a regional variation, I think in Southern LA mostly. So also traditional.

The cajun types i know that do this always used classic southern white potato salad with gumbo -- I never saw a creole mustard version in new orleans. i bet it's good

i grew up with just rice but i tried potato salad for christmas and my family was all very down. the creaminess and temperature contrast is weirdly good

eke out fucked around with this message at Apr 12, 2019 around 01:40

The_Doctor
Mar 29, 2007

"The entire history of this incarnation is one of temporal orbits, retcons, paradoxes, parallel time lines, reiterations, and divergences. How anyone can make head or tail of all this chaos, I don't know."


I finally went to Dooky Chase's for lunch today. That's some good fried chicken.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




That Works posted:

I've got the Picayune cookbook (an amalgam of Picayne recipes put together in 1901 and reprinted in paperback).

So I just downloaded this and this book is a trip. The 1901 language is funny as poo poo, and the recipes actually look pretty tasty. Iíd like to try a bunch of this stuff.

I am a little curious about the crawfish soup on page 23 that appears to want me to eat the shells too? Did people in 1901 eat crawfish shells?



EDIT: Holy gently caress, thereís a ďmock turtle soupĒ recipe that wants me to buy a whole calfís head and remove the brains myself.

EDIT 2: Thereís an entire section on how to cook ďstingareesĒ which Iím pretty sure means stingrays.

I wonder what stingrays taste like.

I. M. Gei fucked around with this message at Apr 23, 2019 around 02:06

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

I. M. Gei posted:

So I just downloaded this and this book is a trip. The 1901 language is funny as poo poo, and the recipes actually look pretty tasty. Iíd like to try a bunch of this stuff.

I am a little curious about the crawfish soup on page 23 that appears to want me to eat the shells too? Did people in 1901 eat crawfish shells?



EDIT: Holy gently caress, thereís a ďmock turtle soupĒ recipe that wants me to buy a whole calfís head and remove the brains myself.

EDIT 2: Thereís an entire section on how to cook ďstingareesĒ which Iím pretty sure means stingrays.

I wonder what stingrays taste like.

Yeah it's hilarious / amazing but most of the recipes still stand up well.

TheKingslayer
Sep 3, 2008

There are no men like me. There's only me.

I've heard a good substitute for turtle in turtle soup is veal since the meat texture is really similar. I've never tried it but it sounds interesting.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Chief Justice of the United States of Anime


Veal and ground gator meat are common substitutes.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

I want to be like Grace Kelly.

At least according to my dad, stingrays/skate used to get cut up in round pieces and be sold as scallops so I guess they taste pretty good? Especially since Iím not sure there are a really any native scallops on the gulf coast? I got that book too but havenít had a chance to read through it yet. Older editions of the Joy of Cooking have fun recipes for possum and stuff in them too.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005

I fear the man who has hit one dinger ten thousand times.




That Works posted:

Yeah it's hilarious / amazing but most of the recipes still stand up well.

Oh Iím sure they do. Like I said, Iím interested in trying a lot of them.

Those dessert chapters

akma
Jan 30, 2016

I simply lack the motivation to write anything here.

The_Doctor posted:

I finally went to Dooky Chase's for lunch today. That's some good fried chicken.

Came home yesterday, and my wife was watching a documentary about Dookie Chase. Used to eat lunch there regularly until I moved. I truly miss Miss Leah's cooking.

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goodness
Jan 3, 2012

When the light turns green, you go. When the light turns red, you stop. But what do you do when the light turns blue with orange and lavender spots?


There is a seafood truck with live crawfish, as well as Shrimp/Crab/Gulf Red Snapper/etc, coming through my area tomorrow morning from LA.

I've eaten a lot of crawfish but never done the boil myself, what is your goto process? Corn, potatoes, sausage will go in to.

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