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Zaepho
Oct 31, 2013


Doom Rooster posted:

I got my roux to a tiny bit darker than milk chocolate. I wanted to take it darker, but the oil started smoking. I was using plain vegetable oil. If I want to go darker, should I use something with a higher smoke point, like canola?

Smoke point of the oil shouldn't be an issue in getting a darker roux. Lower the heat on your pan and let go longer and slower to get the color you're looking for.

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Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Awesome, thanks. Any thoughts on using butter/clarified butter instead of oil for a roux?

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Doom Rooster posted:

Awesome, thanks. Any thoughts on using butter/clarified butter instead of oil for a roux?

butter does well but is a little less forgiving of temperature. Peanut oil is also good.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


Honestly the best roux just in my opinion or I will fight you to the death with a shard of glass if you disagree are made with animal fat as it has more flavour especially duck fat.

Duck fat in particular has a wonderful flavour that it adds.

If you want a amazing roux gumbo you really need to purchase a decently sized large cast iron dutch oven. This way you can cook the roux in the pot that you are going to prepare the gumbo in.

The other one is smoked butter which is almost impossible to loving find, but you can make your own by cold smoking or simply adding liquid smoke (although it doesn't taste as good) to your butter and making the roux with that.

Also, that whole " Cook your vegetables in the roux" is bullshit, you just made it turn into paste. It's just not a good idea, because if you makea thicker roux you'll have difficulty when you add your vegetables. This also get's rid of the moisture that the vegetables are going to have, and will not "thin" your roux.

Simply cook your veggies in a seperate pot till the onions etc.. are translucent. Add your broth slowly to the roux and incorporate it then add your vegetables , meat, etc.. You should only do like 2 Cups, then see how tall in the Dutch oven that brings the broth and liquid to, only add liquid till you just cover the vegetables and meat.

Low and slow is the trick with Roux, pretty much the same philosphy as Risotto, your gonna stand there and stir it about once a minute every 30 seconds. You don't have to continually stir Roux, but you do need a long time to cook it. It will eventually start to brown , you can speed things up by a higher temp and stirring very frequently, then turning the heat very low , basically if it starts to smoke turn the heat down and keep stirring.

It just takes practice.

edit:

I'm pretty happy right now though finally found a nearby grocery that sells ham hocks so I made huge pot of Red Beans and Rice w/ Andouille( Johnsonville it's not bad though ) . I forget how easy Red Beans and Rice is to make.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at Aug 29, 2014 around 16:58

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


If I were to substitute bacon for andouille in something, because it's a pain in the rear end to find for non-fuckoff gluten free people prices, what spices would I need to add to help get closer, since the bacon just has salt, sugar, (sometimes pepper) and smoke?

or if there's a better substitute I can find at a regular grocery store on the west coast that poors like me go to, that would be helpful too.

Woof! Woof!
Aug 21, 2006

Supporters of whatever they're calling the club this week.


Kielbasa is a good sub for andouille, or at least as good as it gets.

Otherwise spices in andouille often include onion, garlic, thyme, sage, bay leaf, paprika, cayenne, clove, allspice, mustard powder.

If you used a bit of all of those you might get close but really andouille is a flavor in and of itself so it's not like it'd make the most sense to dump all those into something and convey the same things… andouille isn't a flavor that permeates the rest of a dish as much as adding real spices. It's a fairly hearty smoked sausage that's gonna keep it's poo poo together in the pan. It's smokeyness and fattyness might leak out though - which your bacon should kind of get at.

I'd use kielbasa.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Woof! Woof! posted:

Kielbasa is a good sub for andouille, or at least as good as it gets.

Otherwise spices in andouille often include onion, garlic, thyme, sage, bay leaf, paprika, cayenne, clove, allspice, mustard powder.

If you used a bit of all of those you might get close but really andouille is a flavor in and of itself so it's not like it'd make the most sense to dump all those into something and convey the same things… andouille isn't a flavor that permeates the rest of a dish as much as adding real spices. It's a fairly hearty smoked sausage that's gonna keep it's poo poo together in the pan. It's smokeyness and fattyness might leak out though - which your bacon should kind of get at.

I'd use kielbasa.

I would also give the same advice, it's right on. For me andouille is usually so freaking overpriced (and often poor quality) it's rare that it ever makes it into any of the cajun food I make anymore.

The spice profile above is right on, the ones that stand out the most to me from it are black pepper, garlic, paprika and cayenne. You could use a bit of decent smoked paprika if you weren't using a smoky sausage or bacon to help with that but I don't even stress about it.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


I can't seem to find a store that does andouille in North Jersey. I don't wanna gently caress with some Hillschire farms knockoff. I've just gotten good smoked keilbasa and it works very well in any dishes I've done.

On the topic of throwing in your veggies into the roux, what's the logic behind that? I've seen different takes on it, and I know the Nola recipes site in the OP adovcates for it (while also throwing in some trinity later on for more texture).

On that note, I am making the catfish courtbullion recipe from that site in the op. It is still cooking a bit, and tastes very good, but it's also really similar to etouffe is it not? I've never actually hat courtbullion in a restaurant, so I don't have a good basis for comparison as I do with other dishes. I do feel like I probably should have darkened my roux a bit more. It was almost like milk chocolate in color.

e: finished product

THE MACHO MAN fucked around with this message at Aug 30, 2014 around 20:10

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

THE MACHO MAN posted:

I can't seem to find a store that does andouille in North Jersey. I don't wanna gently caress with some Hillschire farms knockoff. I've just gotten good smoked keilbasa and it works very well in any dishes I've done.

On the topic of throwing in your veggies into the roux, what's the logic behind that? I've seen different takes on it, and I know the Nola recipes site in the OP adovcates for it (while also throwing in some trinity later on for more texture).

On that note, I am making the catfish courtbullion recipe from that site in the op. It is still cooking a bit, and tastes very good, but it's also really similar to etouffe is it not? I've never actually hat courtbullion in a restaurant, so I don't have a good basis for comparison as I do with other dishes. I do feel like I probably should have darkened my roux a bit more. It was almost like milk chocolate in color.

e: finished product



Ingredient wise it is very similar to etoufee. Overall though it should be far more tomato and lemon flavor and the liquid should be very watery, more like gumbo than etoufee and served over rice. Typically I use a much heavier garnish of parsley and green onion than anything else and top with a few squeezes of lemon juice after. Think of it more like rice with a thin herby tomato soup instead of something really hearty like etoufee.



Made a big batch of gumbo for some friends here in Boston. Effort post tomorrow.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


Just used smoked sausage, beef is fine. Also you can make your own and smoke it if what you are finding is to expensive. I will say though Johnsonville's Andouille sausage is passable and usually very inexpensive.

Look for Johnsonville Andouille, it's not terrible.

neogeo0823
Jul 4, 2007

NO THAT'S NOT ME!!


Can I get some opinions on Trader Joes Andouille Sausage? I've used it before and I think it's pretty great, but the only other andouille that's not balls expensive, especially right now, is Johnsonville, so I don't have much to compare to.

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


Re: all the Andouille talk.

I grew up in the heart of Cajun country, and honestly, not a whole lot of people used Andouille (might be a NOLA/SE LA thing). Don't sweat it if you can't find it. Most of the food I had growing up used good old smoked pork sausage.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

I made a thing yesterday for a bunch of friends, had a nice pot of chicken and sausage gumbo. And to be topical, I used kielbasa and a pound of linguica which has a nice peppery / garlic heavy profile.

Most of the ingredients:


Browning chicken in one pot, cooking down onions, celery and peppers in the other:

Chicken went right in with the vegetables along with the linguica.

Okra added in (went with 1 lb of frozen chopped okra because the store didn't have any fresh that day, works well usually though) along with the can of diced tomatoes:


Used the leftover chicken fat from browning along with a couple more tbls of butter and 1 cup of flour for the roux:


A bit later:


Then added in a few cups of homemade chicken stock.

After this I added salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, a few dashes of Worcestershire sauce and a couple mashed cloves of garlic.

Added in a little more stock after combining the roux with the vegetables, chicken and linguicia and a bit of bay leaves / thyme:


I let the above cook for about 1.5 hours on a very low boil then added the kielbasa and cooked for another 1h. Then I added in some chopped parsley and green onions (not pictured in the 1st photo) and served over rice.


It came out really well and all the company loved it. I highly recommend making your own stock for these as it gives it a nice velvety texture if you make a very rich and reduced chicken stock etc.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


neogeo0823 posted:

Can I get some opinions on Trader Joes Andouille Sausage? I've used it before and I think it's pretty great, but the only other andouille that's not balls expensive, especially right now, is Johnsonville, so I don't have much to compare to.

Smoked Pork sausage is a perfect substitute , I'v never had Trader Joes but I've had some of their other sausage, is it cooked and smoked? Some people will sell sausage called "andouille" but it's not smoked.

neogeo0823
Jul 4, 2007

NO THAT'S NOT ME!!


Yes, it's cooked and smoked. I don't recall if it's pork off the top of my head. It's also organic, if that counts for anything.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


It's probably good to use then.

Shadowhand00
Jan 22, 2006

Golden Bear is ever watching; day by day he prowls, and when he hears the tread of lowly Stanfurd red,from his Lair he fiercely growls.

Toilet Rascal

I was watching mind of a chef (season 2) where they go to Louisiana. Does anyone have a good recipe for Shaved Catfish? It seems pretty straightforward - do I just need to filet the catfish super thin and then cornmeal deep fry it?

He also did the thing with mashing okra on a mortar pestle - this seems like a great way to get the slime into your gumbo - anyone else do this?

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


I actually prefer whole okra in my gumbos, dunno why just do.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

This is a continental dish but I've also had it in a few kitchens growing up. This also gets converted into stuffed bell peppers and also I've had it in a slightly different derivative as stuffed merlitons (chayote).

http://poupetteinthekitchen.blogspo...d-tomatoes.html

More or less following that recipe. Back home we used fresh creole tomatoes. Beefsteak work especially well for here as the flesh is pretty tough and easier to scoop out and make a nice shell with.

The ingredients:

Not pictured is 3 cups of chicken stock.

You'll want to cut the tops off and scoop out and reserve the tomato innards. Then chop up the onion, garlic, parsley and add to the meat / eggs. I use a 50/50 mix of ground beef and ground pork, adding a healthy dash of salt and black pepper and mix in well by hand. You can use shallots also here. Part out the meat and add into each tomato. These are already placed in a baking dish over 2 cups of rice.



Next cut up the tomato flesh, use the nice soft bits and toss over the remaining spaces in the pan, strain the seeds and remainder, for this I got about 1 cup of juice.



Then added this and the 2 cups of stock back to the pan.



I didn't realize how lovely the pic was until I already had them in the oven.

Into a preheated oven at 400F for 1h.



Note to self: use a slightly bigger pan. I tossed the rice a bit around the tomatoes to let some of the juices mix in a bit better and let that cool for 15m or so before serving.



Came out quite well.

If you're doing these with merlitons, I'd mix in some tomato paste and rice in with the meat along with celery and probably not have the rice in the pan as they don't release as much liquid as the tomatoes will.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


gently caress yeah. Stuffed tomatoes, cabbage, peppers, etc rule.

witchcore ricepunk
Jul 6, 2003

The Golden Witch
Who Solved the Epitaph


A Probability of 1/2,578,917


Shadowhand00 posted:

I was watching mind of a chef (season 2) where they go to Louisiana. Does anyone have a good recipe for Shaved Catfish? It seems pretty straightforward - do I just need to filet the catfish super thin and then cornmeal deep fry it?

That really does seem to be all you have to do to make it, judging from what they showed.

TenaciousJ
Dec 31, 2008

Clown move bro


THE MACHO MAN posted:

On the topic of throwing in your veggies into the roux, what's the logic behind that? I've seen different takes on it, and I know the Nola recipes site in the OP adovcates for it (while also throwing in some trinity later on for more texture).

I think it's just preference. I prefer the mouth feel when I cook the veggies right into the roux so the water gets shocked out of them. If I add something mushrooms in, I would always add them into the roux since they basically turn into sponges for the liquid when you shock all the natural liquid out.

It's also just convenient since you'll only need 1 pot for the gumbo and 1 for the rice.

Breaky posted:

I made a thing yesterday for a bunch of friends, had a nice pot of chicken and sausage gumbo. And to be topical, I used kielbasa and a pound of linguica which has a nice peppery / garlic heavy profile.

Is that Gaspar's Linguica in the pic? I love that stuff for making stews and I find it's a fine replacement for andouille in cajun food.

TenaciousJ fucked around with this message at Sep 10, 2014 around 14:13

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

TenaciousJ posted:

Is that Gaspar's Linguica in the pic? I love that stuff for making stews and I find it's a fine replacement for andouille in cajun food.

I'll check the brand next trip to the store. I think it is though. We have a lot of Brazilians / Portuguese in the area so its way easier to find than andouille. And yeah I agree its a great replacement.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

guppy posted:

2. I used white pepper instead of black pepper because for some reason in my head that was the authentic thing to do. Everyone in here seems to be using black pepper so I'm assuming that's not true.

"Black pepper for bite, white pepper for burn."

Black pepper contains both the sun-dried outer husk, the black part, and the seed, which is the white part. Black is a little more complex and bitey up front. Paul Prudhomme calls for black, white, and cayenne in almost every recipe. I usually only use white pepper for mashed potatoes, hot-and-sour soup, and spice rub mixes like PP's.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014




just got my first roux finished. Looks like molasses once I dumped holy trinity in it. I was being overly cautious and it took an hour and a half (I understand why, now) - felt like dancing with the devil.



That was an obnoxious amount of fun. I put it on top of a white/wild rice mix, because I felt like adding something Canadian to my Cajun. 10/10 would do again.

CommonShore fucked around with this message at Sep 25, 2014 around 02:54

Zaepho
Oct 31, 2013


CommonShore posted:

just got my first roux finished. Looks like molasses once I dumped holy trinity in it. I was being overly cautious and it took an hour and a half (I understand why, now) - felt like dancing with the devil.



That was an obnoxious amount of fun. I put it on top of a white/wild rice mix, because I felt like adding something Canadian to my Cajun. 10/10 would do again.

Quit measuring roux time by the clock. Start measuring in beers and your roux will always be amazing

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

CommonShore posted:

just got my first roux finished. Looks like molasses once I dumped holy trinity in it. I was being overly cautious and it took an hour and a half (I understand why, now) - felt like dancing with the devil.



That was an obnoxious amount of fun. I put it on top of a white/wild rice mix, because I felt like adding something Canadian to my Cajun. 10/10 would do again.

Looks like it came out right! You can do them faster once you get comfortable with it. Also a lot of it depends on the quality of flour / type of oil etc.



Zaepho posted:

Quit measuring roux time by the clock. Start measuring in beers and your roux will always be amazing

This guy knows what's up.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014




I'm really quite surprised at how thin the broth is actually. I showed the (slightly and probably not enough edited) first page recipe to a coworker and she made me doubt myself a bit on the amount of flour, so I probably ended up putting more like 1 3/4 in with roughly 2.5 l of chicken broth (two store cartons + some from my freezer). There's virtually no thickening, and I don't really get the sense that another 1/4 cup of flour would tip any scales in that respect.

And yeah, I now have a much better sense of how to brown up the roux, especially in relation to my own stove's heat output. Once I inched the knob up above 40% and started stirring a bit less, it didn't take terribly long to get there.

I also wasn't complaining about the 90 minutes. I had fun (except when the cats started fighting and I couldn't leave the stove to separate them). I had no idea that so many different smells could come out of flour and lard. There's easily enough nuance there for someone to become obsessed. I wish that I had a big cauldron to make a huge batch all at once into which I could huck entire small animals, perhaps stirring it while wearing an apron instead of a shirt.

e. I couldn't find file, and in hindsight I think I needed more okra, too. I put 13 in, and they were kind of smallish. That also probably accounts for the lack of thickening. I'd increase the okra by maybe a third next time around, if I still can't find any file.

CommonShore fucked around with this message at Sep 25, 2014 around 13:39

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

You measure roux by the color of you and your friends' skin. So a white roux would be like Jennifer, a blond roux would be your own skin, then a brown roux would be James, and a dark roux would be Angela.

Stottie Kyek
Apr 26, 2008

fuckin egg in a bun

I had a go at a vegetarian version of the jambalaya in the OP tonight. Instead of using prawns or fish in it, I made a stock with seaweed and used that for the liquid, and added some smoked paprika and smoked salt for the sausagey flavour. I had a little trouble keeping stirring the pot though, it kept sticking to the bottom of the pan after the rice went in, I need to remember to check it more often. Final result was delicious though, thanks for the recipe!

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


Stottie Kyek posted:

I had a go at a vegetarian version of the jambalaya in the OP tonight. Instead of using prawns or fish in it, I made a stock with seaweed and used that for the liquid, and added some smoked paprika and smoked salt for the sausagey flavour. I had a little trouble keeping stirring the pot though, it kept sticking to the bottom of the pan after the rice went in, I need to remember to check it more often. Final result was delicious though, thanks for the recipe!
You don't have to stir jambalaya, it's just like making regular stovetop rice. Bring it to a simmer and lid it. Jamabalaya is closer to paella than it is risotto

holttho
May 21, 2007



So I decided I would make some gumbo. Though I live in Chicago with good access to somewhat real andouille, I figured buying things is for quitters: I'm gonna make it.

holttho posted:

I used a bastardized cross between Ruhlman and TheSpicySausage.com andouille #1 recipe. I picked up some of those family packs of 'blade chops' as they were somehow cheaper than a whole-intact shoulder. Ground and stuffed about 6lbs of sausage, then smoked for about 3hours in a somewhat warm smoker (about 150-170F). I use a hotplate with a pan of wood chips (apple this time; it's what I had on hand) and my horrible, cheap, prone-to-starting-itself-on-fire smoker.





(ignore the grubbiness of the grate)

My god is it good. At first I was a little worried about the slightly crispy, over-done spots, but they are actually the best parts.


--I also threw on some bacon wrapped chicken legs because why not.

So I have made the OP-quote gumbo recipe in the past, and the only change I make is I use slightly less roux. The OP calls for a 9:9oz roux, I use a 6:6oz. Also, I didn't bother to get any file. Otherwise, I made the recipe pretty faithfully.

Day 1: LARD!



I do the oven baked roux, as I've never been let down by it and it is very forgiving. The first two pictures here are within about 3-5 minutes of each other, then every other picture is about 20 minutes apart in a 350F oven. Just take it out, stir till it is completely smooth (it will separate a bit) then pop it back in. I could have probably gone another 40-60 minutes if I was daring, but it was closing in on bedtime by the last installment and I wanted time to cool it off before I chucked it in the fridge.



Day 2: The rest of it

1:1:1 onion:celery:green pepper. I would say there is probably a little over a cup of each, though the way I do this, I probably won't use all of it. The way I do this is after it is all diced up, I mix it all up nice and even and once the roux is back up to temperature, I toss in the veg a handful at a time. What I am looking for is the roux to stick completely to the veg with none pooled on the bottom. I used about 90% of the trinity. It's gonna hiss and steam and try to bully you something fierce, but stay strong! Stir it hard. You'll tame it yet. Hit the brakes as late as you dare.



Get the stock ready to dump and saute/fry the vegetables for roughly 10 minutes then kill it with stock. Normally I make my own stock, but I had enough dishes to create for the party I am making this for. I used 2 boxes and 1 can chicken broth. However, I only dumped in the can and one of the boxes. The other was going to be fortified with my process leftovers.

Since I made the sausage myself, I had some bone scraps and onion as well as the excess trinity and all the shrimp shell. Also, I had some potato peels from the Cajun potato salad I am having for accompaniment as well as some mushrooms that I needed to use up. Toss it all in. Hell, I paid for it, I'm gonna get my money's worth.



Toss in chicken thighs and let simmer for 3+ hours. Dump in the fortified stock when it's ready. Add spices. The chicken will disintegrate into little strands by the end of this.

Toss in sliced okras and a couple sausages cut into 1/4" slices. Only want to put these in within 30 or so minutes before finishing or the sausage will get tough and the smoked skin will lose its pleasant snap when bitten. I thought about frying up the sausage before putting in, but they are already powerful flavorful, so I didn't bother. Realize the gumbo is a little thick, dump in half a Tecate.



Just before transferring to the crock pot to bring to my party, dump in the shrimp and kill the heat. There is more than enough heat to cook the shrimp through in the gumbo. Serve with potato salad and rice(on the side) and bread.

I forgot to take a picture of the final bit, but I brought roughly a gallon of gumbo and went home with an empty crock.

Recipe used:

6:6oz dark lard roux
1c diced onion
1c diced celery
1c diced g.pepper
15 okras
1.5lb of chicken thigh meat. I used boneless, but that's because it was a good deal and I didn't want to bother fishing out the knob of cartilage afterwards.
1lb 41-50 shrimp
2lb andouille
(2) 48oz chicken stock cartons + (1) 24oz chicken stock can
~1T cayenne pepper
~1T thyme
3-4 bay leaves
couple good cracks of pepper
salt
~6oz beer

-------
As I said, I served this with a potato salad, no photos of that, there ain't much to it. But here's the recipe. It was drat good.

~3lb Yukon gold potato. Boil in seasoned water until just tender. Cut into ~1/2" cubes, chill completely.

Make a "Cajun" mayo and spice it up! (I had been drinking for quite a while by this time, so I just kinda winged it. Forgive any potato salad heresy on my part): 1yolk, 1c neutral oil, some white wine vinegar, lemon juice, a dash plus two more dashes of mustard powder, some cayenne and cumin. A splash or four of your favorite hot sauce; two pinches of salt and two of sugar. Beat it. Seriously, make your own mayo. It takes maybe 60 seconds to make a cup of oils worth with a hand whisk. Don't be scared about the "one drop of oil at a time" people. Just don't dump it all at once.

Finely dice green pepper, celery, and some dill pickles, but get rid of the seeds part of the pickle. That's just goop; use only the flesh part. Retrieve potatoes and fold it all together gently, chill and enjoy.

holttho fucked around with this message at Nov 13, 2014 around 22:20

rojay
Sep 2, 2000



Hollismason posted:


Also, that whole " Cook your vegetables in the roux" is bullshit, you just made it turn into paste. It's just not a good idea, because if you makea thicker roux you'll have difficulty when you add your vegetables. This also get's rid of the moisture that the vegetables are going to have, and will not "thin" your roux.


Disagree. You can do it however you want; it's gumbo, it'll almost certainly turn out ok if you can cook at all, but putting the vegetables into the roux stops the roux from getting darker. That liquid you're talking about is what does it.

onemanlan
Oct 4, 2006
I HAVE A MAN CRUSH ON YOU TOO, YOU LOVABLE FAGGOT!

I think its worth mentioning how dangerous roux can be when you bring them up. Be very careful when making it and for the love of god don't splash it. If it gets on your skin the combo of the oil and flour will burn the gently caress out of you. Anybody who's done it likely wont do it again. Be careful making that delicious food.

After reading up on your duck fat roux I'm going to have to go for it next time I have a chance. Otherwise some other animal fat will have to be handy.

onemanlan fucked around with this message at Dec 23, 2014 around 23:10

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


I made a big batch of gumbo with a duck fat/ bacon fat blend from some duck confit I made, with a stock made from the roasted duck carcass and a pork shoulder bone, plus shrimp shells. It was heavenly, would highly recommend.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

That Works posted:

Red Beans and Rice

This dish is commonly made on Mondays as a way to utilize leftover ham and pork bones from Sunday dinner. This is a customary dish as Ham is typically served on Sundays and you can find this on special for Monday lunches all over the region. This dish is distinctly Creole, if you were wondering about that.

Need some help here. I'm making red beans and rice tonight and I've used the recipe on page 1 before, but I thought I always soaked the beans overnight.

Here's the recipe:

quote:

Red Beans and Rice

Ingredients:

1 pound dry red beans
3 quarts water
1 cup chopped onions
1 cup chopped celery
4 bay leaves
1 cup chopped sweet green pepper
4 tablespoons chopped garlic
3 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 teaspoons dried thyme - crushed
1 pound andouille sausage - cut into 1/4 in.pieces
1 good ham bone and small chunks of ham
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon pepper
Tabasco, if desired.


Instructions:

Pick through beans to remove bad beans; rinse thoroughly.
In a 10 quart pot combine beans, water, ham bone with ham, andouille
sausage, onion, celery, and bay leaves.
Bring to a boil; reduce heat.
Cove and cook over low heat, for about 1&1/2 hours or until beans are tender.
Stir and mash beans against side of pan.
Add green pepper, garlic, parsley, thyme, salt, and black pepper.
Cook uncovered, over low heat until creamy, about 30 minutes.
Remove bay leaves.
Serve over hot cooked fluffy rice.
Tabasco to taste.

The red beans used in Louisiana are not the same as kidney beans,but
if you can't get any thing else the kidney beans will work.

Makes 8 servings

Here's the problem-I forgot to soak them overnight last night and I want to make this for dinner today. Any ideas if the recipe meant to keep them dry or should I go for a fast boil method?

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014




nwin posted:

Need some help here. I'm making red beans and rice tonight and I've used the recipe on page 1 before, but I thought I always soaked the beans overnight.

Here's the recipe:


Here's the problem-I forgot to soak them overnight last night and I want to make this for dinner today. Any ideas if the recipe meant to keep them dry or should I go for a fast boil method?

If dry beans spend > 90 minutes baking in a covered dutch oven at ~250 F, they'll be fine. I do it all the time. You'll probably need to add a bit more water. If you're worried about them, start them separately or something.

I don't want to make any guarantees for you, but personally I'd be confident trying that recipe with dry beans.

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

No Resetti.
No Continues.




Grimey Drawer

I made that recipe using dry beans and it turned out fine. I was thinking of soaking them but the recipe says dry, so I went dry.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Is that true of pretty much all beans? I did it with dry pinto beans last night -- I made the borracho beans recipe Gravity posted in the first page of the POT BEANS thread -- and they were good in about that timeframe, but I wasn't sure if I could do that for all beans. I usually use cans because I often don't have the foresight to soak, but if I can use dried straight off if I'm willing to wait an hour or two then I can use a lot more dried.

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That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

guppy posted:

Is that true of pretty much all beans? I did it with dry pinto beans last night -- I made the borracho beans recipe Gravity posted in the first page of the POT BEANS thread -- and they were good in about that timeframe, but I wasn't sure if I could do that for all beans. I usually use cans because I often don't have the foresight to soak, but if I can use dried straight off if I'm willing to wait an hour or two then I can use a lot more dried.

I find that you can use dry beans but you're going to be gassy as hell if you do compared to letting them soak a bit.

Also, you should make sure you bring your beans up to a boil for a few minutes no matter which way you end up cooking them:

http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIl...k/ucm071092.htm

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