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guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Thanks. I am gonna eat so many beans.

And yeah, generally anything I simmer gets brought to a boil briefly before being reduced to simmer, unless it's something that can't be boiled.

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OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


I was taught to at least quick-soak at a minimum: bring beans & a lot of water to a boil, cover with lid, set heat to low. After 1-2h, strain and dump the gassy fartwater.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

OMGVBFLOL posted:

I was taught to at least quick-soak at a minimum: bring beans & a lot of water to a boil, cover with lid, set heat to low. After 1-2h, strain and dump the gassy fartwater.

Ah yep, that was the quick soak method I was trying to remember. I've done this as well when I didn't soak overnight.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


neogeo0823 posted:

Can I get some opinions on Trader Joes Andouille Sausage? I've used it before and I think it's pretty great, but the only other andouille that's not balls expensive, especially right now, is Johnsonville, so I don't have much to compare to.

That Works posted:

For me andouille is usually so freaking overpriced (and often poor quality) it's rare that it ever makes it into any of the cajun food I make anymore.

THE MACHO MAN posted:

I can't seem to find a store that does andouille in North Jersey. I don't wanna gently caress with some Hillschire farms knockoff. I've just gotten good smoked keilbasa and it works very well in any dishes I've done.
Just make your own y'all



That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

feelz good man posted:

Just make your own y'all





One day... one day...

That looks fantastic by the way

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007
The Bartender

Looks good but I am cringing at the thought of making that much sausage with a KA.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


Shooting Blanks posted:

Looks good but I am cringing at the thought of making that much sausage with a KA.
It was either use the $7 attachment I got at goodwill or spend $7 plus another $150 for an LEM vertical stuffer.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


Niceeee

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


I pickled some okra this summer, and just finished eating the first jar. The brine got thickened by the okra; is the brine useful for gumbo? There has to be some precedent; I can't be the first person to wonder about this.

Normally pickle brine gets re-used for pickling eggs, but this stuff seems too thick to use for that. It's got the consistancy of a very light syrup.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


OMGVBFLOL posted:

I pickled some okra this summer, and just finished eating the first jar. The brine got thickened by the okra; is the brine useful for gumbo? There has to be some precedent; I can't be the first person to wonder about this.

Normally pickle brine gets re-used for pickling eggs, but this stuff seems too thick to use for that. It's got the consistancy of a very light syrup.
You could use it as a brine for fried chicken. That would be bomb on some po'boys. Maybe mix a little of the brine into the remoulade or maybe put some of the okra in the sandwich

Fozzy The Bear
Sep 27, 2009

My reaction after reading this
------>


Made some chicken/shrimp gumbo like I've done a few times before. But this time I made a roux, my first time making a roux. It started really quickly darkening and I got scared and took it off the heat and added my onions and vegetables. Ended up just light brown roux, I should have let it go longer. Now my whole gumbo tastes like a bowl of chicken gravy. Practice makes perfect I guess.

Cosmic Charlie
Apr 6, 2009

How do you do? Truckin' in style along the avenue


Hey guys, I made some shrimp etouffee tonight following the recipe from the op here. The next time I make it I may add in some rosemary, has anyone here tried this? I know its probably not authentic etouffee but it seems like it would be tasty, any thoughts?

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Cosmic Charlie posted:

Hey guys, I made some shrimp etouffee tonight following the recipe from the op here. The next time I make it I may add in some rosemary, has anyone here tried this? I know its probably not authentic etouffee but it seems like it would be tasty, any thoughts?

I've never put it in mine but if you think it would taste good I'd go for it.

Sounds like it would.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it




Pan-crisped pecanwood smoked tasso ham with homemade remoulade. God drat this was good

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls


Niceeee.

I've had tasso before and it's pretty great, but I've never tried making. Is there a standard cut of meat used for it??

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

feelz good man posted:



Pan-crisped pecanwood smoked tasso ham with homemade remoulade. God drat this was good

You made the tasso? Mind sharing how if so?

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


That Works posted:

You made the tasso? Mind sharing how if so?

http://frombellytobacon.com/2010/04...erie-tasso-ham/

This recipe here. I made another batch recently but I forgot that it's a dredge method, not a rub, so they turned out inedibly salty and hot because I wasn't thinking. You dredge them in the cure lightly, let them sit for four hours, rinse, then cover in some fresh spices and hot smoke the strips. Way easy.

*EDIT* use pork shoulder, anything else is too lean

feelz good man fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2015 around 02:47

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


Sorry if this has been covered before, I couldn't find specifics:

Let's say smoking is 100% out. No patio, no grill, no hot smoker, no cold smoker, no outdoors, no DIY cardboard box with a sautering iron and a tin can full of wood chips, nothing. Nothing but an oven and a spice cabinet.

That's my situation. Two questions:
1) Good options for smoky spices? Liquid smoke seems the obvious choice, but what about dry options? How does smoked paprika compare to liquid smoke?
2) What oven situation would approximate a smoker in terms of temperature and dry air? 200F and a roasting pan, or should I pop for some sort of wire rack? I have a V-rack for poultry; something like that? It's not a convection oven, either, so should I set the temp higher on the oven than it would be in the smoker to make up for the fact that air is circulating in a smoker but stagnant in an oven?

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014




OMGVBFLOL posted:

Sorry if this has been covered before, I couldn't find specifics:

Let's say smoking is 100% out. No patio, no grill, no hot smoker, no cold smoker, no outdoors, no DIY cardboard box with a sautering iron and a tin can full of wood chips, nothing. Nothing but an oven and a spice cabinet.

That's my situation. Two questions:
1) Good options for smoky spices? Liquid smoke seems the obvious choice, but what about dry options? How does smoked paprika compare to liquid smoke?
2) What oven situation would approximate a smoker in terms of temperature and dry air? 200F and a roasting pan, or should I pop for some sort of wire rack? I have a V-rack for poultry; something like that? It's not a convection oven, either, so should I set the temp higher on the oven than it would be in the smoker to make up for the fact that air is circulating in a smoker but stagnant in an oven?

I wouldn't say that it does at all. It adds relatively little smoke flavour to the food, or rather, I've never added so much of it to anything I've made in which I go "wow that tastes smokey."

holttho
May 21, 2007



OMGVBFLOL posted:

Sorry if this has been covered before, I couldn't find specifics:

Let's say smoking is 100% out. No patio, no grill, no hot smoker, no cold smoker, no outdoors, no DIY cardboard box with a sautering iron and a tin can full of wood chips, nothing. Nothing but an oven and a spice cabinet.

That's my situation. Two questions:
1) Good options for smoky spices? Liquid smoke seems the obvious choice, but what about dry options? How does smoked paprika compare to liquid smoke?
2) What oven situation would approximate a smoker in terms of temperature and dry air? 200F and a roasting pan, or should I pop for some sort of wire rack? I have a V-rack for poultry; something like that? It's not a convection oven, either, so should I set the temp higher on the oven than it would be in the smoker to make up for the fact that air is circulating in a smoker but stagnant in an oven?

1. Smoked salt can also be acquired, though it won't add too much smokey flavor, especially considering the cost. Real, true smoke flavor is next to impossible to harvest for later use. There are so many highly volatile oils and esters and whats-its that flit away into the ether within minutes leaving you with a hollow imitation. Liquid smoke is the best we can currently do, it's only ingredients are water and smoke.

2. You will probably want some sort of rack to ensure air on the underside as well as to prevent it starting to braise when it releases juices. Just put some big aluminum foil on the rack beneath the one you are operating on. Or a pan if you enjoy cleaning things. As far as the oven goes, chances are if your oven isn't convection, it also isn't sophisticated enough to maintain a low, 200F temp. But, this can be remedied simply by using a small ball of foil to wedge the oven door open. Keeping the door open a crack will help achieve a low temp and make the oven work much more frequently to maintain it, which will cause a constant heat and air flow from the heating element on the bottom to the open crack at the top front. As a final note, you will probably want to invest in an oven thermometer or a probe thermometer so that you can fine tune the temp dial.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


OMGVBFLOL posted:

Sorry if this has been covered before, I couldn't find specifics:

Let's say smoking is 100% out. No patio, no grill, no hot smoker, no cold smoker, no outdoors, no DIY cardboard box with a sautering iron and a tin can full of wood chips, nothing. Nothing but an oven and a spice cabinet.

That's my situation. Two questions:
1) Good options for smoky spices? Liquid smoke seems the obvious choice, but what about dry options? How does smoked paprika compare to liquid smoke?
2) What oven situation would approximate a smoker in terms of temperature and dry air? 200F and a roasting pan, or should I pop for some sort of wire rack? I have a V-rack for poultry; something like that? It's not a convection oven, either, so should I set the temp higher on the oven than it would be in the smoker to make up for the fact that air is circulating in a smoker but stagnant in an oven?

Sorry, been there myself. There is absolutely no substitute for real barbecue. Don't waste money on liquid smoke either, it's nasty stuff.

neogeo0823
Jul 4, 2007

NO THAT'S NOT ME!!


feelz good man posted:

Sorry, been there myself. There is absolutely no substitute for real barbecue. Don't waste money on liquid smoke either, it's nasty stuff.

Liquid smoke has its uses. Combine 1/4 cup Trader Joes Soyaki marinade with 1 tbsp. applewood liquid smoke for an honestly drat tasty marinade. Not barbeque, obviously, but yeah, good use.

TVarmy
Sep 11, 2011

like food and water, my posting has no intrinsic value



Michael Ruhlman blogged about using a stovetop gadget for smoking meat. It's ~$50, which isn't too crazy.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

A family member out of Alexandria, LA shared their etouffee recipe with me after some wheedling. The stuff is always fantastic (and was my intro to eating crawdads). The secret ingredient is loving velveeta of all things. Is this some real heresy?

holttho
May 21, 2007



They say if you've tried every bottle of wine that's ever been made and your favorite is Two-Buck-Chuck, then that's what you drink.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


1) you could go to a restaurant supply store and get a half hotel pan for like $3, some tinfoil, and a wire rack insert and have virtually the same thing if you were dead set on never getting your damage deposit back ever again
2) lol at producing any sort of wood smoke inside with rental apartment hood ventilation
3) if there is a parking lot, there is a way, or so my American tailgating blood tells me. Park your car on the street or something and get one of these http://www.amazon.com/Weber-10020-S...s=weber+propane and smoke small amounts of things at a time

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

RedTonic posted:

A family member out of Alexandria, LA shared their etouffee recipe with me after some wheedling. The stuff is always fantastic (and was my intro to eating crawdads). The secret ingredient is loving velveeta of all things. Is this some real heresy?


holttho posted:

They say if you've tried every bottle of wine that's ever been made and your favorite is Two-Buck-Chuck, then that's what you drink.

This.

I personally probably wouldn't throw in something like that in mine, nor recommend it as a standard recipe but I like where mine is at right now.

A friend made me a pot of etoufee and a majority of the stock he added in with his roux was beer and cream of mushroom soup. Not gonna lie it tasted pretty fantastic in the end.


One thing I have found is that several of my friends parents etc end up adding cream or cream of X soup and I imagine the velveeta would be a similar thing and what you get is some flavor and some good thickening mouthfeel from the cream and/or cheese. For me using a really good scratch stock with a lot of collagen in it gives the same mouthfeel and in my opinion a nicer flavor. Many of the people using these cream-type additions are probably also using a canned stock I'd reckon. Just food for thought.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

I've been in the kitchen when he made it, and he actually uses frozen stock. Not sure if that's his own or what. Recipe seems largely standard in every way... Except velveeta. But the velveeta seems to be added with utmost secrecy because while I saw it in the fridge, I never did see it come out.. You're right, though; if the velveeta brings me to the dance, might as well keep going dancing with processed cheese.

Megasabin
Sep 9, 2003

I get half!!

Question about the OP gumbo recipe. When it says to remove the roux from the heat, and then add the vegetable trinity, is all you are doing literally just moving the pot over from the heated surface to a non-heated surface while adding those 3 things, then moving it back when adding the chicken stock?

Also is there a more precise measurement for the stock? There are different sized boxes so I'm not sure what 3 boxes means.

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


IIRC, removing the pot from the heat is to let it cool slightly for 5-ish minutes before adding the trinity, to help prevent the roux from burning. That's what I've been doing anyway, and so far so good. As far as the broth goes, I usually see boxed broth in 32 or 48 fl oz cartons, so probably somewhere around 3-4 quarts, depending on how thick your roux is, what other thickening agents you're using, and how thick you want the end product to be.

holttho
May 21, 2007



The important thing would just be to add the stock slowly and see where it ends up. Everybody has a little different preference on what thickness it should end at. I use just a little over 3 quarts, but taking the long simmer into account, I probably lost a pint of water or so. It's easy to add more, hard to take it away.

Taking the roux off the heat for a few minutes will help it to cool down a bit, but that stuff hangs onto heat like crazy. (Doubly so if you are making this in cast iron) Ideally what we are doing by that is to not have the 400 degree fat instantly burn your trinity. I usually just have the trinity be a tiny bit damp when I throw it in. Not dripping wet or anything, but just a little bit of water to tank the heat in the roux. Rinse them in a colander and let them sit in the sink and then remove the roux from the heat. Both should be good to go in a few minutes. Just remember you need to toss it in and stir immediately, so you don't want a giant steam cloud ruining your day.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Avant de chanter
Ma vie, de fair' des
Harangues
Dans ma gueul' de bois
J'ai tourne sept fois
Ma langue
J'suis issu de gens
Qui etaient pas du gen-
re sobre
On conte que j'eus
La tetee au jus
D'octobre...

FWIW I've never removed it from the heat and never burned my roux or the trinity. Though I have moved to adding the onions first, and cooking them down for 5-10 minutes before adding the rest. I also gradually move from a high heat to a medium throughout the roux process.

As far as stock, I typically I end up using 2-3 quarts then maybe adding a cup or two more stock or water (or oyster liquor in seafood gumbo), like holttho says. This allows adjustment from a relatively thick gumbo to a soupier one. A tip on stock--get it hot before you add it and go one ladle at a time. Don't just dump it all on there. Mix each ladleful in and you can watch it come together. This will help keep it from clumping up.

Also I dispute that recipe in one respect: you can't overcook shrimp in gumbo as long as you leave them in there long enough. I like to add a handful of small (41-50) peeled shrimp when I still have 1-1.5 hours to go. They get real small and loaded with flavor and they melt in your mouth. I add a bunch of larger guys toward the end for the big mouthful of beautiful shrimp but those earlier ones turn out great.

Megasabin
Sep 9, 2003

I get half!!

Just attempted the gumbo. It's cooking now. I never managed to get the roux chocolate brown. It ended up being dark yellow-tanish, and the consistency ended up more like porridge, so I think I put too much flour in? I'm currently in the 4 hour simmer phase, and it looks like the attached image below. Not sure how badly I messed it up, but hopefully it will be edible. Any tips for next time on how to get a dark brown roux?

During the simmer phase, what do you guys normally bring the heat down to? Also lid of the pot on or off?

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Megasabin fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2015 around 21:32

Zaepho
Oct 31, 2013


Megasabin posted:

Just attempted the gumbo. It's cooking now. I never managed to get the roux chocolate brown. It ended up being dark yellow-tanish, and the consistency ended up more like porridge, so I think I put too much flour in? I'm currently in the 4 hour simmer phase, and it looks like the attached image below. Not sure how badly I messed it up, but hopefully it will be edible. Any tips for next time on how to get a dark brown roux?

During the simmer phase, what do you guys normally bring the heat down to? Also lid of the pot on or off?

Darker Roux is just more time over a low to medium heat. Roux takes time, like grab a few beers kinda time. Alternately you can do Alton Brown's trick of making the roux in the oven. it's still a long time (like an hour if i recall correctly) but is a bit easier.

Lid is dependent on the thickness to me. If it's too thin, Lid off. If it's thick already, lid on to let the steam condense back into the gumbo.

Generally based on your picture I would guess you have a bit more roux than necessary so it'll be ticker than you might have expected. However, what you have should be perfectly edible.

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Avant de chanter
Ma vie, de fair' des
Harangues
Dans ma gueul' de bois
J'ai tourne sept fois
Ma langue
J'suis issu de gens
Qui etaient pas du gen-
re sobre
On conte que j'eus
La tetee au jus
D'octobre...

Megasabin posted:

Just attempted the gumbo. It's cooking now. I never managed to get the roux chocolate brown. It ended up being dark yellow-tanish, and the consistency ended up more like porridge, so I think I put too much flour in? I'm currently in the 4 hour simmer phase, and it looks like the attached image below. Not sure how badly I messed it up, but hopefully it will be edible. Any tips for next time on how to get a dark brown roux?

During the simmer phase, what do you guys normally bring the heat down to? Also lid of the pot on or off?



Your roux is undercooked. You've made a big pot of bechamel. Did you use oil or lard, and what was your ratio of flour to fat? 1:1 should be plenty. And like Zaepho says, roux-cooking is a multiple-beer affair. Like 2-3 beers, or as some old timers like to say, both sides of an LP.

Phil Moscowitz fucked around with this message at Feb 28, 2015 around 23:02

Megasabin
Sep 9, 2003

I get half!!

Phil Moscowitz posted:

Your roux is undercooked. You've made a big pot of bechamel. Did you use oil or lard, and what was your ratio of flour to fat? 1:1 should be plenty. And like Zaepho says, roux-cooking is a multiple-beer affair. Like 2-3 beers, or as some old timers like to say, one side of an LP.

I used 1 1/2 cups of butter to 2 cups of flour like it said in the recipe. I couldn't find lard in the grocery store. I melted all the butter 100%, then stirred the 2 cups of flour in gradually over 25 minutes. My roux looked exactly like this google search image I've attached. Should I have just kept stirring for another 10-20 min?

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Phil Moscowitz
Feb 19, 2007

Avant de chanter
Ma vie, de fair' des
Harangues
Dans ma gueul' de bois
J'ai tourne sept fois
Ma langue
J'suis issu de gens
Qui etaient pas du gen-
re sobre
On conte que j'eus
La tetee au jus
D'octobre...

I almost always use oil at this point (none of the ducks I shoot have much fat on them) and I almost always go with 1 cup oil, 1 cup flour, 2-3 quarts stock to end up with about 8-10 servings of gumbo.

Either way, the answer is yes--cook it longer and it will get darker. If you are concerned about burning, set aside an extra 45 minutes and cook it on a lower temperature. I cook a gumbo roux in 45 minutes or less, most of it on high heat, but I am constantly stirring with one hand and beer-drinking in the other.

The thickness you seem to have from the pictures comes more from the amount of stock you've added. If I have two cups of flour I am thinking I need a whole lot more stock.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006



Fun Shoe

Megasabin posted:

I used 1 1/2 cups of butter to 2 cups of flour like it said in the recipe. I couldn't find lard in the grocery store. I melted all the butter 100%, then stirred the 2 cups of flour in gradually over 25 minutes. My roux looked exactly like this google search image I've attached. Should I have just kept stirring for another 10-20 min?



Yep that's a bit blonde still. You can turn up your heat a bit to speed things up but don't go overboard. You should be shooting for a hazelnut brown color in about 20 mins give or take.

wheez the roux
Aug 2, 2004
THEY SHOULD'VE GIVEN IT TO LYNCH

Death to the Seahawks. Death to Seahawks posters.

how the gently caress did i of all people miss rouxchat for so long

my sister made some andouille so im gonna have to jambalaya this weekend. also i need The Best Seafood Etouffee Recipes U Got so i can take advantage of my killer shrimp and crawdaddy hookup. my mom keeps her's so secret she won't even let other family members see it lol

e:

haha holy poo poo my parents have had this book longer than i've been alive. i should really get a copy

wheez the roux fucked around with this message at Feb 27, 2015 around 00:16

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5MinuteButtermilk
Mar 4, 2014


Should roux have a smell while cooking? I made roux for the first time today, and it went from smelling sort of greasy to smelling like burnt popcorn. I'm reasonably sure that the burnt popcorn smell is because I burned it, but should it have that greasy smell? I used 1/2 cup of vegetable oil and 1/2 cup of flour.

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