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Daylen Drazzi
Mar 10, 2007

Why do I root for Notre Dame? Because I like pain, and disappointment, and anguish. Notre Dame Football has destroyed more dreams than the Irish Potato Famine, and that is the kind of suffering I can get behind.

My unit is undergoing a realignment to make us more in line with other units with the same job function/responsibility, although I think we're the only one with such a high ratio of contractor-to-military personnel. My team lost three people in the shuffle, meaning now that I get to do on-call rotation every three weeks instead of every four. Annoying, but tolerable.

The pisser is that the commanding officer wants to put his stamp on the unit, so there's a lot of talk about "eliminating redundancy", even though the whole purpose of the unit is to provide redundancy of critical functions and systems. Bad news is that everyone keeps looking at the Server Farm team that I'm on and keeps questioning why they even need us since we're extremely redundant. At this point I'm just trying to ride the money train until I have my VCP and MCSA and can find something better that pays a lot more. I've got my VMware class starting next week, and once that's done I'm going to try and knock the test out and move on to MCSA 2008 and try and get it over with before the contract is re-negotiated sometime next year.

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Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

Today, I'm mad that I can't just apply for a job with a cover letter email linking to my CV on my personal domain.

Or at least everyone seems to think that I'm super weird for wanting to do so.

LinkedIn's application process is loving awesome. Attach cover letter PDF, click Apply.

Varkk
Apr 17, 2004




TWBalls posted:

I can't say for certain, but I seem to recall reading that it was ngen.exe compiling stuff in the background that was the culprit.

If that was the case you would expect it to use a chunk of resources, but when applying it and checking the usage even on an otherwise idle system processor usage doesn't get over 5% and there isn't much RAM or disk IO either. It is possible they limit the resources the update process can use to stop it from swamping an otherwise busy system, but surely they could detect the load level somehow and adjust accordingly.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Caged posted:

LinkedIn's application process is loving awesome. Attach cover letter PDF, click Apply.

eugh but then I gotta use linkedin and make a pdf

nzspambot
Mar 26, 2010



TWBalls posted:

I can't say for certain, but I seem to recall reading that it was ngen.exe compiling stuff in the background that was the culprit.

I recall this as well


--


gently caress aerohive; why do you give me an error message when actually it has worked.

mewse
May 2, 2006



EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

Today, I'm mad that I can't just apply for a job with a cover letter email linking to my CV on my personal domain.

Or at least everyone seems to think that I'm super weird for wanting to do so.

If you make it to the "serious consideration" stage, your resume will often be printed out for discussion between HR drone and IT manager in whatever board room they utter their vile spells in

PDF

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



mewse posted:

If you make it to the "serious consideration" stage, your resume will often be printed out for discussion between HR drone and IT manager in whatever board room they utter their vile spells in

PDF

I know this, it's why I'm mad.

Iron_Chef
Sep 19, 2003
Chef of Iron

Varkk posted:

If that was the case you would expect it to use a chunk of resources, but when applying it and checking the usage even on an otherwise idle system processor usage doesn't get over 5% and there isn't much RAM or disk IO either. It is possible they limit the resources the update process can use to stop it from swamping an otherwise busy system, but surely they could detect the load level somehow and adjust accordingly.

As mentioned the .Net patches are re-compiling in the background with a low process priority so it feels like they take forever

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

This is our current procedure for creating new user accounts and it may seem like there are many steps but it is actually loads of fun, especially since none of them are automated.

wintermuteCF
Dec 9, 2006

LIEK HAI2U!

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

I know this, it's why I'm mad.

Suck it up, twinkle-tits. That's how it gets done in the real world. That sort of "here's my personal CV resume domain webpagestravaganza" only works in the creative sector (like marketing or graphic design). HR people don't give a poo poo: they need a Word/PDF thing that they can run through their digital OCR scanner, eliminate resumes without certain keywords, and pass on to the hiring manager after a very cursory once-over that takes them a few seconds. Job-hunting in this economy (where there are significantly more job-seekers than job-opportunities) is about not giving HR/HA's a reason to eliminate you, which is exactly what your fancy-pants personal website does.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



wintermuteCF posted:

Suck it up, twinkle-tits. That's how it gets done in the real world. That sort of "here's my personal CV resume domain webpagestravaganza" only works in the creative sector (like marketing or graphic design). HR people don't give a poo poo: they need a Word/PDF thing that they can run through their digital OCR scanner, eliminate resumes without certain keywords, and pass on to the hiring manager after a very cursory once-over that takes them a few seconds. Job-hunting in this economy (where there are significantly more job-seekers than job-opportunities) is about not giving HR/HA's a reason to eliminate you, which is exactly what your fancy-pants personal website does.

NO COMPLAINING IN THE COMPLAINING THREAD

dotster
Aug 28, 2013



EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

NO COMPLAINING IN THE COMPLAINING THREAD

Maybe he wants more manly complaining with chewing tobacco and lots of spitting. He is pretty much right though, PDF is how to send a resume, Web 2.0 has been over since 2009 or something.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



dotster posted:

PDF is how to send a resume, Web 2.0 has been over since 2009 or something.

I know this, I just think it's stupid. That's why I'm complaining about it. In the complaining thread.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


The worst is a place that wants you to fill out their stupid resume web form, then paste a plaintext, and then allows you to upload a Word .doc

teethgrinder
Oct 9, 2002



Soiled Meat

Sounds like government.

I remember first looking for a job in the mid 2000s and PDFs weren't acceptable because HR wanted to edit them for some reason. I had originally been using LaTeX for my resume, so that was a nuisance.

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003




Buglord

I have a great-looking PDF document, but when I upload it to most of those resume sites, it comes up blank

Here's something that pisses me off: the CIO told my manager we need a cloud storage solution for file sharing and mobile file access. My manager tasked me with the project. For the past two months I've been researching and talking to vendors and am currently setting up an evaluation of one of the products. I was working on getting the Sr. Systems Engineer up to speed on the project and he cut me off with, "no, it's not a good idea to use cloud storage, it's totally insecure, I don't want to do it." Even though it's... all kinds of certified for security, and half of the phone conference we're going to have is going to be about central administration and security

SIGH... But if the Sr. Engineer strikes it down, guess that's two months of work down the drain. Guess we'll go with an in-house storage server with no mobile access forever.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



QPZIL posted:

SIGH... But if the Sr. Engineer strikes it down, guess that's two months of work down the drain. Guess we'll go with an in-house storage server with no mobile access forever.

OwnCloud?

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003




Buglord


Not a bad idea actually...

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Bob Morales posted:

The worst is a place that wants you to fill out their stupid resume web form, then paste a plaintext, and then allows you to upload a Word .doc

Don't even apply for those jobs. Think if it like voting with your wallet. Their system is so unreasonable that you refuse to participate.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


evol262 posted:

Don't even apply for those jobs. Think if it like voting with your wallet. Their system is so unreasonable that you refuse to participate.

I didn't. After the second resume I just logged off. They called me anyway.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


evol262 posted:

Don't even apply for those jobs. Think if it like voting with your wallet. Their system is so unreasonable that you refuse to participate.

I did this a few times during my job search. I also figured that if their web stuff was this hosed, I probably didn't want to work in their IT department anyway.

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

Our e-mail guy got one too many requests to increase a director's mailbox size, so he's educating the helpdesk that we need to tell the users to delete items. That's great, but the users 100% of the time say they can't delete anything, because the archive isn't working or they only need a size increase temporarily or whatever bullshit. In the past, when we've told the users we wouldn't be able to open a ticket for them, they just go to e-mail guy's boss, who then tell us to open a work order. E-mail guy believes this is a client-side issue and needs to be handled by desktop support.

Oh, and our mailbox size limit is 400MB.

Here's what pisses me off, more than anything:

my boss posted:

Unfortunately, when [e-mail guy] pushes back as a client services issue, we have to prove that it is not a client services issue. I know this is not quite fair but it is the way it works here. Once we have proven that nothing can be done by client services and document it, then we can push back. If we've done what we can and can't fix it and SA is not willing to accept the work order, then the client should escalate it higher. We just need to be sure we have everything that was tried documented.

anthonypants fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 17:44

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


It's not 2007 anymore, 400MB is just not an acceptable mailbox limit anymore. gently caress, Microsoft will give you 50GB with O365 for under 10 bucks a month.

Sickening
Jul 15, 2007

Black Summer was the best summer.

skipdogg posted:

It's not 2007 anymore, 400MB is just not an acceptable mailbox limit anymore. gently caress, Microsoft will give you 50GB with O365 for under 10 bucks a month.

Changing up your entire email infrastructure is not exactly a painless task. Quite frankly something like this is what I would expect a user to say.

Sickening fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 19:04

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


skipdogg posted:

It's not 2007 anymore, 400MB is just not an acceptable mailbox limit anymore. gently caress, Microsoft will give you 50GB with O365 for under 10 bucks a month.

TWBalls
Apr 16, 2003
My medication never lies

skipdogg posted:

It's not 2007 anymore, 400MB is just not an acceptable mailbox limit anymore. gently caress, Microsoft will give you 50GB with O365 for under 10 bucks a month.

For us, the only way you're going to get a 400MB Inbox is if you're on the Admin team. Directors top off @ 300MB, end users most often top off at 50MB but, I've seen go as high as 100MB depending on their role. Standard Inbox is 20MB, which is where mine is. We're expected to put poo poo into PST's or delete.

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Do not ingest.

QPZIL posted:

SIGH... But if the Sr. Engineer strikes it down, guess that's two months of work down the drain. Guess we'll go with an in-house storage server with no mobile access forever.

Young grasshopper, seeking buy-in from the principal players is of Utmost Importance for any project. Get this before you do any research on your own. Your Engineer might have been afraid for his own job, or having a bad day, or whatever when he shot down your solution, but it doesn't matter because this might have been the first time he was introduced to it.

Office Politics 101: Nothing actually gets decided during meetings. The real work in getting a project approved happens in hall-calls and informal conversations at the water cooler and this is where you get the "votes" for a project. By the time you walk into any meeting, you should know the outcome before the meeting even starts.

On the bright side, you now have all this technology knowledge in your pocket for the next time this subject comes up, so it isn't entirely wasted effort.

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

TWBalls posted:

For us, the only way you're going to get a 400MB Inbox is if you're on the Admin team. Directors top off @ 300MB, end users most often top off at 50MB but, I've seen go as high as 100MB depending on their role. Standard Inbox is 20MB, which is where mine is. We're expected to put poo poo into PST's or delete.
We've also outlawed psts. We haven't actually prevented users from using psts on their own, but we don't support em and the policy is Don't Use PSTs.

Sickening posted:

Changing up your entire email infrastructure is not exactly a painless task. Quite frankly something like this is what I would expect a user to say.
We're going through a 2010 migration right now, and e-mail guy is incapable of doing it on his own so we've hired a contractor. Migrating our 2500 users to Google Apps would cost less in both the short and long terms than this fuckup.

anthonypants fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 19:26

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


anthonypants posted:

We've also outlawed psts. We haven't actually prevented users from using psts on their own, but we don't support em and the policy is Don't Use PSTs.

What do you do with those emails from 7 years ago that I NEED TO SAVE FOREVAR

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

Bob Morales posted:

What do you do with those emails from 7 years ago that I NEED TO SAVE FOREVAR
We use an ancient version of Mimosa Nearpoint and it's a steaming pile of garbage.

Also I just noticed they don't support Exchange 2010. That's incredible.

anthonypants fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 19:43

Hawzy
Dec 13, 2002



Bob Morales posted:

What do you do with those emails from 7 years ago that I NEED TO SAVE FOREVAR

drag and drop onto a file share.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Sickening posted:

Changing up your entire email infrastructure is not exactly a painless task. Quite frankly something like this is what I would expect a user to say.

It's not that difficult either if you A) Know what the gently caress you're doing and B) Set the environment up right.

I get so tired of lovely admins that don't know what they're doing, or companies that won't fund their critical infrastructure properly. The worst end user experience during our email migration was having to restart Outlook. Maybe I'm loving spoiled or something because my company isn't afraid to spend money on IT. Our Office365 E3 sub costs us drat near 7 figures a year.

anthonypants posted:

Migrating our 2500 users to Google Apps would cost less in both the short and long terms than this fuckup.

Google Apps runs 50 bucks a user/year, so that would be 375K for 3 years. In house email is probably less expensive than that. Probably not a whole lot more once you factor everything in like hardware/software/CALs/Spam&Virus but hosted email isn't usually less expensive for larger organizations.

Sickening
Jul 15, 2007

Black Summer was the best summer.

anthonypants posted:

We've also outlawed psts. We haven't actually prevented users from using psts on their own, but we don't support em and the policy is Don't Use PSTs.
We're going through a 2010 migration right now, and e-mail guy is incapable of doing it on his own so we've hired a contractor. Migrating our 2500 users to Google Apps would cost less in both the short and long terms than this fuckup.

Exchange has always been hell. Its just an inflexible piece of poo poo that has left me jaded long ago.

You are still going to run into issues of migrating to gmail or o365. Something is not going to migrate perfectly accounts wise.

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

skipdogg posted:

Google Apps runs 50 bucks a user/year, so that would be 375K for 3 years. In house email is probably less expensive than that. Probably not a whole lot more once you factor everything in like hardware/software/CALs/Spam&Virus but hosted email isn't usually less expensive for larger organizations.
I'm pretty sure you get a break if you're a local government. Or we could partner with a local ISP. There are legitimately good reasons for keeping e-mail in-house, but they are literally throwing money away. Google Apps is just one way for us to have a working e-mail system and to have e-mail guy gently caress off.

slurry_curry
Nov 26, 2003
<3mini-moni+animu^_^



Bob Morales posted:

The worst is a place that wants you to fill out their stupid resume web form, then paste a plaintext, and then allows you to upload a Word .doc

I just had to deal with this poo poo from HP's HR website. At least their forms where smart enough to pull data from the plaintext doc to populate the web form resume with prior jobs, etc. Normally I don't deal with that poo poo, but it was for a job that was as good as mine, just had to do the official HR poo poo.

Speaking of, I guess its YOTJ for me as well, and my first time going to a big company. Up until now, I have only worked at places with with around 50 or less employees, and one place that was prolly under ~300. The HR process for onboarding at HP has been insane and something I have never dealt with before. Either way, I am really looking forward to starting the new job.

skipdogg posted:


Google Apps runs 50 bucks a user/year, so that would be 375K for 3 years. In house email is probably less expensive than that. Probably not a whole lot more once you factor everything in like hardware/software/CALs/Spam&Virus but hosted email isn't usually less expensive for larger organizations.

Gotta remember to add in the cost of a email admin to that pricing. I have run into that before where the upper management thinks it will be so much cheaper to bring email in house, until we point out they will need to hire a fulltime email admin to deal with it. Suddenly hosted options look much better.

slurry_curry fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 19:52

Sickening
Jul 15, 2007

Black Summer was the best summer.

skipdogg posted:

It's not that difficult either if you A) Know what the gently caress you're doing and B) Set the environment up right.

I get so tired of lovely admins that don't know what they're doing, or companies that won't fund their critical infrastructure properly. The worst end user experience during our email migration was having to restart Outlook. Maybe I'm loving spoiled or something because my company isn't afraid to spend money on IT. Our Office365 E3 sub costs us drat near 7 figures a year.


Google Apps runs 50 bucks a user/year, so that would be 375K for 3 years. In house email is probably less expensive than that. Probably not a whole lot more once you factor everything in like hardware/software/CALs/Spam&Virus but hosted email isn't usually less expensive for larger organizations.

I didn't say it was difficult, I said it wasn't painless. Lots time for planning, time for setup, and some $$$$ so joe bloe exec doesn't have to manage his inbox once or twice a month.

Its the same situation as other shared storage mediums. If I was working under the expectation that all company data needed to be kept without any user intervention forever, the infrastructure would eventually become ridiculous and the cost/time would be wasteful for the scope of operations.

Sickening fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 20:04

Mierdaan
Sep 14, 2004



Pillbug

Bob Morales posted:

What do you do with those emails from 7 years ago that I NEED TO SAVE FOREVAR

Explain how retention policies work? Preferably with a lawyer standing behind you while you do so?

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

Mierdaan posted:

Explain how retention policies work? Preferably with a lawyer standing behind you while you do so?
Well, we've got five retention folders in your Outlook Inbox: _01 Year, _05 Years, _10 Years, _20 Years, and Permament. It's up to you and your department to decide which e-mail goes in which folder. You can create all the subfolders you want, but everything will get stored in the archive. E-mails in your inbox get backed up silently, and are deleted after 90 days. If you want to look at e-mails older than 90 days, or you want to make sure an item has been archived, you have to go into the archive.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Our limits are around 100MB unless you're a special snowflake, in which case it's 2GB, and we have a 90-day retention policy (forced by Legal, thank god, so we don't get yelled at for it) either way. Attachment limit 10MB, which isn't unreasonable but we also don't seem to know or care that sometimes our users have legitimate needs beyond that 10MB and don't currently offer a real solution. There's network shares, of course, and our needs are mostly internal to the organization, but we have sites all over and we start to run into issues when we need to share data between multiple sites or departments and they don't have access to the same places. We work around it but the network admins have to intervene on a case-by-case basis. It's bizarre to me that we've not implemented a better solution.

We officially banned .psts but the special snowflake rule has reared its head here as well and they're all over.

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Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Do not ingest.

anthonypants posted:

Well, we've got five retention folders in your Outlook Inbox: _01 Year, _05 Years, _10 Years, _20 Years, and Permament.

In the last twenty years, having worked for exactly one company that has existed longer than five years (and that was a city government), I got a perverse delight in the optimism involved around creating 10 year, 20 year and Permanent folders.

More like:

Inbox
_Crazy Months
_Good Years
_Fading Hopes
_Oh Please Buy Us
_I'm the last guy here. Guess I'll burn this to DVD and shut the lights off now.

Agrikk fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2013 around 21:07

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