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Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Argue posted:

Do you mean that you would put the meat in the oven instead of searing it in a hot pan/blowtorching the outside like I do? That's a new one on me; can this be done with steaks? Times/temps?

Steaks aren't ideal for that. Unless super thick, they heat through quickly, and because they're flat they're easy to pan sear anyway. But a thick steak high in an oven with a broiler element works very well.

It's best for things that are harder to pan sear, a curved or uneven surface. I've used this on skin-on chicken breast and whole chickens recently. In both cases I cooled down the meat before debagging it, because oven searing takes a bit longer. I didn't time it, but put the oven on full blast and let it sit until I was happy with it. In my experience this also brought the cooled core temp up to a nice serving temp.

Patting it dry is important so you don't waste heating time on evaporating water. Perhaps a little butter baste would be good on a lean surface.

It really helps if you have a powerful broiler. Think of it as the common man's salamander.

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SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Dewgy posted:

It's a clever new technological thing that works on very very basic physics principles, and I think it's neat and offers amazingly consistent results.
It's not particularly new, it's just getting more popular among home cooks. The underlying idea---sealing food in pouches and then cooking in a water bath at low temperatures---was first implemented in the '60s, for industrial preparation of meals for hospital food service. Here's a description from May of 1969 (in Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly):



And here's a link to the patent application.

There were a couple of chefs who hosed around with the idea in the '70s, but it wasn't until the early '90s that it started creeping into high-end cooking. It eventually made its way into the repertoire of guys like Heston Blumenthal and Thomas Keller, and they introduced it to a broader audience that first used old industrial immersion circulators (there are people in this thread that started out with old PolyScience ICs) and DIY PID setups.

But even given all that, the SousVide Supreme (which was the first s-v setup designed for the home cook) is just shy of a decade old at this point.

Dewgy
Nov 10, 2005

bok bok bok


SubG posted:

It's not particularly new, it's just getting more popular among home cooks. The underlying idea---sealing food in pouches and then cooking in a water bath at low temperatures---was first implemented in the '60s, for industrial preparation of meals for hospital food service. Here's a description from May of 1969 (in Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly):



And here's a link to the patent application.

There were a couple of chefs who hosed around with the idea in the '70s, but it wasn't until the early '90s that it started creeping into high-end cooking. It eventually made its way into the repertoire of guys like Heston Blumenthal and Thomas Keller, and they introduced it to a broader audience that first used old industrial immersion circulators (there are people in this thread that started out with old PolyScience ICs) and DIY PID setups.

But even given all that, the SousVide Supreme (which was the first s-v setup designed for the home cook) is just shy of a decade old at this point.

Neat! I didn't realize there was that much history, but yeah the home use side is still pretty new.

Funny enough I think my own foray into wanting to try SV started a good while back too, maybe 8 years or so? I remember some SA-mart seller offering some kind of odd DIY SV kit for a reasonable price, which was a little janky but seemed like it'd work great. Then they got banned for being scammers.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Dewgy posted:

Neat! I didn't realize there was that much history, but yeah the home use side is still pretty new.
Yeah, s-v is like most of the underlying sciencey poo poo that characterizes modernist/molecular/whatever cooking: it's basically industrial food prep from the mid 20th Century rebranded as posh. Like today everyone immediately reacts to s-v and sodium citrate and so on as spergy food nerd poo poo, but in the early '90s the immediate associations were microwave dinners and Cheez Whiz.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


SubG posted:

Yeah, s-v is like most of the underlying sciencey poo poo that characterizes modernist/molecular/whatever cooking: it's basically industrial food prep from the mid 20th Century rebranded as posh. Like today everyone immediately reacts to s-v and sodium citrate and so on as spergy food nerd poo poo, but in the early '90s the immediate associations were microwave dinners and Cheez Whiz.

I canít wait until MSG hits the same stage in ten more years. Umami for everyone.

That and CVAP or combi ovens. Rational could make a killing with a home model. Installation requirements alone make an install today rather prohibitive in a home today.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Looks like they make a tiny one (the XS) and the only install requirement is that you need a big boy electrical connection and a vent hood.

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

Can someone briefly explain breaking down of collagen? From what I've read, 24-72 hour cooks at 131 will break down the connective tissue, but I've also read that the temperature at which collagen breaks down is 160. What am I not understanding here; will I not get good results doing a lean steak with a lot of connective tissue for 131/48?

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Argue posted:

Can someone briefly explain breaking down of collagen? From what I've read, 24-72 hour cooks at 131 will break down the connective tissue, but I've also read that the temperature at which collagen breaks down is 160. What am I not understanding here; will I not get good results doing a lean steak with a lot of connective tissue for 131/48?

Yes. Collagen breakdown is a function of time and temperature, so it does indeed gelatinize at 131 it just takes a long long time. I do short ribs at 131.5 for 48 hours and they are god drat delicious.

Sentient Data
Aug 31, 2011

My molecule scrambler ray will disintegrate your armor with one blow!


Any recommendations on a cooler/lid for long cooks? I found some containers on amazon that looked good but they were stupidly pricy for a plastic tub. I've been using a big cheap steel stock pot on my stove (burner off, of course) with some aluminum foil to cover it, but I feel like getting something more "proper"

Dewgy
Nov 10, 2005

bok bok bok


Sentient Data posted:

Any recommendations on a cooler/lid for long cooks? I found some containers on amazon that looked good but they were stupidly pricy for a plastic tub. I've been using a big cheap steel stock pot on my stove (burner off, of course) with some aluminum foil to cover it, but I feel like getting something more "proper"

If you mean like the plastic tupperware/lid things, yeah they're expensive, but it's absolutely worth it.

Bin: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Lid: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...2?ie=UTF8&psc=1

(Might be referral links if anyone cares, but I'm not sure)

Got those last year and it's made a huge difference. The snug fit of the lid basically means it's perfect for doing higher temp stuff without major evaporation and it's super handy to have a dedicated vessel for the SV. The bin ends up being where I keep the Anova when I'm not using it, so it's like a case for it too.

eke out
Feb 24, 2013



it's also very feasible to just get a standard plastic lid for your cambro/rubbermaid and spend a little time with a box cutter to get a snug hole cut in it - but it looks like those precut ones are now basically the same prices as a normal lid.

it's totally worth it, either way.

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Iím led to believe that ping pong balls are as good thermally as a lid with hole, but donít funnel steam into the innards of your circulator.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


I lead that belief. They work well enough for SV evaporation, you won't lose a cook while at work or overnight. I wouldn't try to claim it works as well as a closed system/lid.

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eke out
Feb 24, 2013



Subjunctive posted:

Iím led to believe that ping pong balls are as good thermally as a lid with hole, but donít funnel steam into the innards of your circulator.

for what it's worth, I've never had any issue with steam with mine - if it fits snugly, very little escapes and what does isn't really going inside, because it's that wider ring part that sits on the hole.

maybe different models or brands other than anova might change that though? i've never used anything but the one kind

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