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baquerd
Jul 2, 2007
I'M A FUCKING IDIOT



Argue posted:

Looks pretty marbled.




Until I move into my new place, the only cooking utilities available to me are a sous vide bath, an induction plate, and a blowtorch, so I don't think I can go with a more traditional way of cooking this.

How long and at what temp should I go for if I cut it into 3? I know chuck needs to have a long cook, but I don't know how to balance that out with the butcher telling us it's tender.

Edit: 3 pieces would make three 2-inch steaks, and also we apparently have a slow cooker that I've never used

It's begging for a smoker, but I would pressure cook or roast that before considering SV.

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Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

baquerd posted:

It's begging for a smoker

drat yeah.

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

Okay, so following up on my question, I learned something about chuck this weekend: maybe this is well known to people who do steaks all the time but I only found this out now; if it says "chuck eye roll", that doesn't actually give enough information; you need to clarify which end of the chuck it is, because if it's from the end near the ribeye, then it is practically a ribeye and should be cooked as one. Which we did. About 3.5 hours and a sear later, we had a pretty great steak. No need for 48h or even 24. Of the 4kg of meat, we did half of it as steaks in the SV, and the other half as cubes in the pan. All were great and I also learned that 4kg of steak is too much even for 10 people.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


Argue posted:

I've never tried to sous vide something this big before; it's 4kg. How should this one go? The butcher said that it wouldn't need to be sous vided because it's wagyu, but that claim is suspect to me because it's still chuck, even if it's wagyu. I was thinking 24h at 134 F? Should I go with a different time/temp? The guests will be here in less than 48 hours so I can't do a 48 hour cook, although right now there's time to get close to that number.

I googled around and it said that if it comes from near the ribeye, then it's practically a ribeye and can just be cooked for a few hours, but I'm not sure if a chuck eye is from near the ribeye.




Am I a crazy person or does this say 7000 dollars?

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

Philippine Pesos. Roughly 135 USD.

Whalley
Mar 5, 2004

neato devito


Hollismason posted:

Am I a crazy person or does this say 7000 dollars?

it's good meat, hollismason

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Argue posted:

Okay, so following up on my question, I learned something about chuck this weekend: maybe this is well known to people who do steaks all the time but I only found this out now; if it says "chuck eye roll", that doesn't actually give enough information; you need to clarify which end of the chuck it is, because if it's from the end near the ribeye, then it is practically a ribeye and should be cooked as one. Which we did. About 3.5 hours and a sear later, we had a pretty great steak. No need for 48h or even 24. Of the 4kg of meat, we did half of it as steaks in the SV, and the other half as cubes in the pan. All were great and I also learned that 4kg of steak is too much even for 10 people.



That's a nice looking steak.

Big Dick Cheney
Mar 30, 2007



Pork and beef in the sous-vide. Does adding alcohol help break down the meat like it does in a slow cooker?

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Big Dick Cheney posted:

Pork and beef in the sous-vide. Does adding alcohol help break down the meat like it does in a slow cooker?

I don't know about in the bag, but it certainly helps kill the waiting time!

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007
deadlift minimalist

Big Dick Cheney posted:

Pork and beef in the sous-vide. Does adding alcohol help break down the meat like it does in a slow cooker?

Does alcohol do anything (other than add beer/wine/whisky flavors) in a slow cooker? I'd figure you'd just get a cloud of alcohol vapor in the air in the cooker after an hour or so at slow cooker temps, which would evaporate when you take the lid off.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

a foolish pianist posted:

Does alcohol do anything (other than add beer/wine/whisky flavors) in a slow cooker? I'd figure you'd just get a cloud of alcohol vapor in the air in the cooker after an hour or so at slow cooker temps, which would evaporate when you take the lid off.

Surprisingly little alcohol "cooks out" with most cooking methods. Other than adding specific flavors, the biggest reason to add alcohol to meat is to get normally low-solubility flavor/aroma compounds into solution without dealing with the separation issues you'd have with oil.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

poeticoddity posted:

Surprisingly little alcohol "cooks out" with most cooking methods. Other than adding specific flavors, the biggest reason to add alcohol to meat is to get normally low-solubility flavor/aroma compounds into solution without dealing with the separation issues you'd have with oil.

Speaking of which, I've noticed that a lot of fat soluble compounds are also alcohol soluble. What's the science behind that?

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

Speaking of which, I've noticed that a lot of fat soluble compounds are also alcohol soluble. What's the science behind that?

Water is polar. Ethanol and lipids are non-polar.
Polar solvents dissolve polar substances and non-polar solvents dissolve non-polar substances.
Ethanol, while being non-polar, is miscible with water, so it doesn't have to become an emulsion to stay mixed.

Fun fact: Above about 96% strength ethanol is hygroscopic and will actually self-dilute from ambient humidity if not kept sealed, hence the 190 proof (95%) max you see on distilled spirits.

Jan
Feb 26, 2008



poeticoddity posted:

Fun fact: Above about 96% strength ethanol is hygroscopic and will actually self-dilute from ambient humidity if not kept sealed, hence the 190 proof (95%) max you see on distilled spirits.

How would you even ethanol above 96% considering it's azeotropic?

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Jan posted:

How would you even ethanol above 96% considering it's azeotropic?

Specialized filter, or you can add a third component (benzene) to allow other distillation.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

poeticoddity posted:

Water is polar. Ethanol and lipids are non-polar.
Polar solvents dissolve polar substances and non-polar solvents dissolve non-polar substances.
Ethanol, while being non-polar, is miscible with water, so it doesn't have to become an emulsion to stay mixed.

Fun fact: Above about 96% strength ethanol is hygroscopic and will actually self-dilute from ambient humidity if not kept sealed, hence the 190 proof (95%) max you see on distilled spirits.

Awesome, thanks.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

ulmont posted:

Specialized filter, or you can add a third component (benzene) to allow other distillation.

An additional option is to add a non-soluble material that's hygroscopic enough to pull the water out of the azeotrope.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


ulmont posted:

Specialized filter, or you can add a third component (benzene) to allow other distillation.

poeticoddity posted:

An additional option is to add a non-soluble material that's hygroscopic enough to pull the water out of the azeotrope.
Theoretically correct, although this isn't how ethanol for consumption is distilled. Everclear is 95% ethanol because that's as high as you can get via fractional distillation, not because it was once 100% ethanol and got diluted down to 95%.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

SubG posted:

Theoretically correct, although this isn't how ethanol for consumption is distilled. Everclear is 95% ethanol because that's as high as you can get via fractional distillation, not because it was once 100% ethanol and got diluted down to 95%.

Yeah, we're well off the rails for a food thread, but any method of making ethanol over the 95% max you see for human consumption is intended to make specifically anhydrous alcohol for scientific, industrial, fuel, or other purposes. If, however, you took anhydrous ethanol and exposed it to the atmosphere, it would self dilute, so you don't even see 96+% stuff as a marketing gimmick.

... though if the water absorption rate exceeded the evaporation rate, in theory, you could pour a level shot which would eventually spill itself, which is pretty neat.

Back on topic, anyone got suggestions for vegetables other than corn, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and carrots that handle freezer-to-sous vide well?

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018


Has anyone here attempted the mayo sear? I have been trying to perfect my sear game. I found the blow torch lack luster and didn't give me the sear I wanted. Lately I have been using rice bran oil and a ripping hot cast iron. I drop a dallop of butter in the pan then drop the steak right on top and sear for a brief period of time.

This definitely works, and my steaks have been great but the may sear has me curious.

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spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

I've never really dug the mayo sear tbh. I don't like it on grilled cheese either.

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