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Dewgy
Nov 10, 2005
ENGLISH VA WORK IN DUBS USUALLY SUCKS BIG TIME


Ultimate Mango posted:

I with Awful app would post pictures from the iOS camera roll. It was a thing of beauty.

It does? Tap, select img, then From Library. If you get an error, try going to your photos, select the picture with the Share button, pick Copy, then go to Awful, select img, and then Paste.

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life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



asciidic posted:

Both butts had their fat caps trimmed a bit, were rubbed vigorously, vac sealed and left in the fridge overnight. The SV butt was cooked at 165 for 24 hours, dried, dusted with more rub, then finished in the Traeger at 300 for 75 mins. It didn't look quite as good as the smoked pork shoulder (not as barky, no smoke ring), but it managed to be better in both flavor and texture. One thing I would probably do differently next time is not add the extra rub between the bath and smoker because the crusty bits were a little salty.

And now I have just an unreasonable amount of pulled pork.

This is pretty much what I did, though my Masterbuilt doesnít go to 300F. I waited until the bark looked like bark, then took it out of the smoker and shredded it. 6lbs of meat gone in...less than an hour. Half a sandwich bag of it left. It was delicious and Iím feeling really good about myself for not loving it up somehow and my family actually liked it...two separate times someone told me I needed to start a food truck

Too bad I donít wanna

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

sparkle and shine



Dewgy posted:

It does? Tap, select img, then From Library. If you get an error, try going to your photos, select the picture with the Share button, pick Copy, then go to Awful, select img, and then Paste.

Sometimes it doesnít work, the devs arenít quite sure why. Can use the imgur shortcut in the thread for it though.

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


Erwin posted:

Isn't trichinosis the main issue with pork, and found throughout the muscle?

Trichinosis isn't a thing with commercial pork. There's maybe a couple of dozen cases a year in the US and it uniformly comes from wild game.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


Trich used to be a major issue, but not anymore in the US. I wasn't thinking about that, but about listeria, for example.

Thrasher
Apr 21, 2002



asciidic posted:

One thing I would probably do differently next time is not add the extra rub between the bath and smoker because the crusty bits were a little salty.

I omit salt from my rub for this reason. Salt the meat separately then add your rub.. if you want more rub later for bark it wonít be adding more salt

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



swickles posted:

I don't understand.

charliebravo77
Jun 11, 2003



Phanatic posted:

Trichinosis isn't a thing with commercial pork. There's maybe a couple of dozen cases a year in the US and it uniformly comes from wild game.

Specifically it's primarily black bears, but also feral hogs, mountain lions and brown bears (where you can hunt them) that will be the main source of trichinosis from wild game.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



Anyone have advice on defrosting / reheating sous vide? I have a bunch of frozen pre-cooked chicken in vacuum sealed bags in my freezer, it'd be great to have a way to warm them back up that doesn't run the risk of further cooking them like in the microwave.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



If you cooked them at 150 you can rehear them at 150.

-e oh nvm. Run the circulator set to like 0 in cold water with your frozen stuff.

Hutla
Jun 5, 2004

It's mechanical

Just set your sous vide to whatever your target hot temperature is and chuck in the bag.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



No need to be careful, just alley oop it in the puddle. You can set it to anything between desired serving temp and final cook temp. Or you can thaw it overnight in the fridge and broil it in the oven.

ColHannibal
Sep 17, 2007


Ola posted:

No need to be careful, just alley oop it in the puddle. You can set it to anything between desired serving temp and final cook temp. Or you can thaw it overnight in the fridge and broil it in the oven.

This is not entirely true.

There are a few clarifications food safety wise, dropping a frozen hunk of anything into a tepid bath is a bad idea as you are kinda just keeping it at the danger zone. Now if the bag was never opened from your original cook then the contents have been pasteurized and the risk is close to zero, but if the bag was opened before freezing the safest thing to do is fridge thaw then puddle at cooking temp.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



ColHannibal posted:

This is not entirely true.

There are a few clarifications food safety wise, dropping a frozen hunk of anything into a tepid bath is a bad idea as you are kinda just keeping it at the danger zone. Now if the bag was never opened from your original cook then the contents have been pasteurized and the risk is close to zero, but if the bag was opened before freezing the safest thing to do is fridge thaw then puddle at cooking temp.

Just a thought from a novice, but wouldnít an ice bath, and thus more rapid cooling, help if the bag is opened? Thinking mostly from a ziploc standpoint. I cook a lot in ziplocs because air removal is easier and vacuum pumping with my bags means that the liquid eventually gets to the valve which is not ideal. But, prepping with sous vide means it can be transferred after cooking to a vacuum bag after being patted dry, sealed, and put in an ice bath quickly so the time spent getting to freezing temperature or especially fridge temperature is lessened

Maybe Iím overthinking this really hard

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



ColHannibal posted:

This is not entirely true.

There are a few clarifications food safety wise, dropping a frozen hunk of anything into a tepid bath is a bad idea as you are kinda just keeping it at the danger zone. Now if the bag was never opened from your original cook then the contents have been pasteurized and the risk is close to zero, but if the bag was opened before freezing the safest thing to do is fridge thaw then puddle at cooking temp.

The heat flow is faster the bigger the temperature difference is. And the difference in temperature between palatable and cooked isn't very big. It thaws really fast in the puddle and as you say, is likely pasteurized already.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


ColHannibal posted:

There are a few clarifications food safety wise, dropping a frozen hunk of anything into a tepid bath is a bad idea as you are kinda just keeping it at the danger zone.
Nah, you're just adding a couple minutes to the cooking time. Here's the data Baldwin presents:



...versus for fridge temperature:



So for a 25 mm/1" thick slab of animal protein at typical s-v temperature's you're adding ~15 minutes to the cook time.

ColHannibal
Sep 17, 2007


SubG posted:

Nah, you're just adding a couple minutes to the cooking time. Here's the data Baldwin presents:



...versus for fridge temperature:



So for a 25 mm/1" thick slab of animal protein at typical s-v temperature's you're adding ~15 minutes to the cook time.

So I agree, what falls apart is reheating which is what my comment is directly related to. For rehearing your normally only concerned with temp less cook time.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


ColHannibal posted:

So I agree, what falls apart is reheating which is what my comment is directly related to. For rehearing your normally only concerned with temp less cook time.
The time/temperature curve doesn't know or care whether you are heating or reheating.

Edit:

For clarity: you're saying to thaw in the fridge and then reheat in the puddle machine. So the meat's going to spend several hours going from ~0 F to ~40 F, and then if it's e.g. a 1" thick steak it'll spend ~1 1/4 hours going from ~40 F to your target temperature.

If you take the same 1" steak straight out of the freezer at ~0 F and put it in the puddle machine, it'll spend ~30 minutes going from ~0 F to ~40 F, and then precisely the same ~1 1/4 hours going from ~40 F to the target temperature that it would using your method.

Literally the only difference is the amount of time the meat spends going from freezer to fridge temperatures.

SubG fucked around with this message at 00:26 on Feb 21, 2021

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




I have a chuck roast going at 135F and in 3h it will have been in for 26h. I plan to do some veggies at 190 while my yorkshire pudding cooks and the roast sears.


Now I just started thinking about potatoes like a chump - I see that their recommended temp is 190 for an hour. Has anyone ever tried doing potatoes at a lower temp for like 2h and then 1/2 an hour at the higher temp?

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

My girl wants to do some zucchini noodles, and Iím wondering if thereís a sweet spot temp I could sous vide them at to keep them texturally interesting but not raw. I could always start at 180 and see what that gives me.

mystes
May 31, 2006



Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

My girl wants to do some zucchini noodles, and Iím wondering if thereís a sweet spot temp I could sous vide them at to keep them texturally interesting but not raw. I could always start at 180 and see what that gives me.
If you don't want them fully cooked wouldn't you be better off quickly blanching them and plunging them into ice water or something? I've never really tried sous viding vegetables, though, and I guess some people do carrots so it may be possible.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

My girl wants to do some zucchini noodles, and Iím wondering if thereís a sweet spot temp I could sous vide them at to keep them texturally interesting but not raw. I could always start at 180 and see what that gives me.

Whatís wrong with cooking them on the stovetop on M/L with a bit of olive oil? I do it every time I make zoodle spaghetti and it always comes out firm. Do you want firm? Because you can cook them and get that if you donít overcookóovercooking them makes them soft and mushy like overcooked pasta

E: is there any reason not to sous vide a hunk of beef pot roast before throwing it in the slow cooker? Reason being itís still not thawed and the recipe takes six hours on high with thawed AND browned-on-the-outside meat

life is killing me fucked around with this message at 15:57 on Feb 22, 2021

Carillon
May 9, 2014





life is killing me posted:

E: is there any reason not to sous vide a hunk of beef pot roast before throwing it in the slow cooker? Reason being itís still not thawed and the recipe takes six hours on high with thawed AND browned-on-the-outside meat

Is there any reason to involve the slow cooker at all? The slow cookers I've had never really browned things very well, so if yours is able to do that great! Otherwise I'd just use the sous vide for the whole thing tbh.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Carillon posted:

Is there any reason to involve the slow cooker at all? The slow cookers I've had never really browned things very well, so if yours is able to do that great! Otherwise I'd just use the sous vide for the whole thing tbh.

This crossed my mind, except this particular recipe (from Bon AppetŪt) has you brown the meat on all sides in a pan before adding it to the slow cooker. Guess they want the Maillard reaction? Iíd sear it after sous vide anyway, this is just reverse

Carillon
May 9, 2014





life is killing me posted:

This crossed my mind, except this particular recipe (from Bon AppetŪt) has you brown the meat on all sides in a pan before adding it to the slow cooker. Guess they want the Maillard reaction? Iíd sear it after sous vide anyway, this is just reverse

Well were it me I'd defrost in sous vide, sear, then add it back to the water bath. Depending on the recipe would also scale back the liquid added as there won't similar evaporation in a plastic bag compared to a crock pot. But that's me as once I fill up a water bath I try and do as much with that.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Carillon posted:

Well were it me I'd defrost in sous vide, sear, then add it back to the water bath. Depending on the recipe would also scale back the liquid added as there won't similar evaporation in a plastic bag compared to a crock pot. But that's me as once I fill up a water bath I try and do as much with that.

Yeah in the crock pot the juices increase. Starts out with just chicken broth, white wine, onions, leeks and tomato paste...but the juices from the meat and veggies start coming out after a few hours. So would have a big juicy mess on my hands in the water bath though next time perhaps I do that...if a 5lbs hunk of beef would be a short poach, which probably it wouldnít be. Took a 6lbs pork shoulder 23 hours at 165F.

Marshal Plugnut
Aug 16, 2005

The code to the exit is 1125



Think I might treat myself to some sv poached eggs before work tomorrow seeing as I can easily drop a few eggs into the ongoing pulled pork bath. A quick google throws up a lot of recipes for 75c, but the tub's at 74. How much difference can 1c make?

Also, a lot of sv pulled pork recipes say to ice bath it before smoking, what's the rationale behind this? Is it solely to make sure it doesn't warm up my fridge while waiting to smoke, or is it essential to the quality of the final product?

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Marshal Plugnut posted:

Think I might treat myself to some sv poached eggs before work tomorrow seeing as I can easily drop a few eggs into the ongoing pulled pork bath. A quick google throws up a lot of recipes for 75c, but the tub's at 74. How much difference can 1c make?

Also, a lot of sv pulled pork recipes say to ice bath it before smoking, what's the rationale behind this? Is it solely to make sure it doesn't warm up my fridge while waiting to smoke, or is it essential to the quality of the final product?

Not sure of any science behind it or lack thereof, but I can tell you I did 6lbs of pulled pork in SV. It went from the bath to the smoker after I dried it off and added more rub. It was excellent and still moist and tender. So most likely itís the former, just decreases the energy efficiency of your fridge and makes it work harder, if you put it in the fridge before the smoker at all, which isnít really necessary unless youíre not doing the smoking portion right away.

Marshal Plugnut
Aug 16, 2005

The code to the exit is 1125



life is killing me posted:

Not sure of any science behind it or lack thereof, but I can tell you I did 6lbs of pulled pork in SV. It went from the bath to the smoker after I dried it off and added more rub. It was excellent and still moist and tender. So most likely it’s the former, just decreases the energy efficiency of your fridge and makes it work harder, if you put it in the fridge before the smoker at all, which isn’t really necessary unless you’re not doing the smoking portion right away.

Cheers, that makes sense. Yeah, it's going in the fridge overnight to be smoked tomorrow so I will ice bath it in that case. If only so it doesn't warm up my beers that are in the fridge too.

sterster
Jun 18, 2006
nothing

Grimey Drawer

It should also help with the smoke condensing onto the surface of the meat as it is cooler.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


life is killing me posted:

Not sure of any science behind it or lack thereof, but I can tell you I did 6lbs of pulled pork in SV. It went from the bath to the smoker after I dried it off and added more rub. It was excellent and still moist and tender. So most likely itís the former, just decreases the energy efficiency of your fridge and makes it work harder, if you put it in the fridge before the smoker at all, which isnít really necessary unless youíre not doing the smoking portion right away.

my man kenji needs to experimentally determine whether it's better to allow the meat to rest and allow the water to flow back in before rehydrating, or to have the meat make fewer temperature cycles

/Look Around You voice: An experiment was carried out to determine...

xtal
Jan 9, 2011



Thoughts on sous vide butter chicken vs instant pot? Secondary question: cook the chicken in the complete sauce, or cook it in a yogurt marinade, then toss in sauce from a stovetop?

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



I think instant potting it or stovetop simmer in the complete sauce is the way to go.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



xtal posted:

Thoughts on sous vide butter chicken vs instant pot? Secondary question: cook the chicken in the complete sauce, or cook it in a yogurt marinade, then toss in sauce from a stovetop?

If itís chicken breast, it would benefit greatly from sous vide since we all know how dry chicken breast can get if not cooked perfectly via traditional methods. If itís dark meat you could get away without sous vide and use an instant pot, though dark meat is baller sous vide too.

But if you do sous vide thereís probably no need to marinate, can just sear it and toss with with sauce maybe? Or dry brine it at most before putting in water bath

fart store
Jul 6, 2018

probably nobody knows
im the fattest man
maybe nobody even
people have told me
and its not me saying this
my gut
my ass
its huge
my whole body
and i have been told
did you know this
not many know this
im gonna let you in on this
some say
[inhale loudly]
im the hugest one.
many people dont know that


xtal posted:

Thoughts on sous vide butter chicken vs instant pot? Secondary question: cook the chicken in the complete sauce, or cook it in a yogurt marinade, then toss in sauce from a stovetop?

The instant pot works well for butter chicken. If you've got access to both, what's the reason you would choose to use sous vide? IME bag juice doesn't make great sauces. I think I read in this thread it's something about meat protein in the solution not denaturing or something. I think that might affect the quality of a butter chicken sous vide.

e: and i recommend this recipe, which is easy and delicious https://www.newyorker.com/culture/annals-of-gastronomy/the-butter-chicken-lady-who-made-indian-cooks-love-the-instant-pot

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Anyone know a good sous vide pork loin recipe? Or at least the best way to finish it after water bath? Iím open to experimenting a little bit as far as brining and seasoning but it doesnít seem like something you sear, reallyóseems more like a finish in the oven cut, am I wrong?

At any rate, we got two small onesóthey are small enough it seems like we will need to cook both tomorrow. But gently caress Iíve not had pork loin in years, we donít do a lot of pork in general and Iím probably a little too excited to have pork loin. I donít wanna gently caress it up

Hauki
May 11, 2010




life is killing me posted:

Anyone know a good sous vide pork loin recipe? Or at least the best way to finish it after water bath? Iím open to experimenting a little bit as far as brining and seasoning but it doesnít seem like something you sear, reallyóseems more like a finish in the oven cut, am I wrong?

At any rate, we got two small onesóthey are small enough it seems like we will need to cook both tomorrow. But gently caress Iíve not had pork loin in years, we donít do a lot of pork in general and Iím probably a little too excited to have pork loin. I donít wanna gently caress it up

if you have a big enough pan/griddle/whatever you can sear it

otherwise torch is good, or yeah, a broiler

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Hauki posted:

if you have a big enough pan/griddle/whatever you can sear it

otherwise torch is good, or yeah, a broiler

Can I smoke it? Like, is pork loin good smoked?

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

life is killing me posted:

Can I smoke it? Like, is pork loin good smoked?

Not really, I donít think, itís a very lean cut without a lot of connective tissue so itís probably not very well-suited to the long cooking times of the smoker.

When I make pork tenderloin I usually sear the exterior of the whole thing then slice into thick medallions and sear those on both sides. I bet you could slice fully-cooked pork loin (not the same thing as tenderloin) from the SV and sear it in a hot pan then make a sauce from the resulting fond. If you donít try it, I might sometime.

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Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


fart store posted:

The instant pot works well for butter chicken. If you've got access to both, what's the reason you would choose to use sous vide? IME bag juice doesn't make great sauces. I think I read in this thread it's something about meat protein in the solution not denaturing or something.

It can, but you've got to then heat the bag juices hot enough for the proteins to denature and then strain them out.

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