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Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Lawnie posted:

When I make pork tenderloin I usually sear the exterior of the whole thing then slice into thick medallions and sear those on both sides. I bet you could slice fully-cooked pork loin (not the same thing as tenderloin) from the SV and sear it in a hot pan then make a sauce from the resulting fond. If you donít try it, I might sometime.

This is what I had been doing as well. I treat it a lot like boneless skinless chicken breast, in a way.

If you get the whole loin from a Costco or something, there usually is a bit of a fat cap on it that'll sear up nice. Otherwise when I'm searing, I try to get some sort of fat or oil into the pan to help with that. Although now that I say that, I can't help but wonder if I shouldn't be considering using the grill because it likely can get a lot hotter than the pan . . . .

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life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Lawnie posted:

Not really, I donít think, itís a very lean cut without a lot of connective tissue so itís probably not very well-suited to the long cooking times of the smoker.

When I make pork tenderloin I usually sear the exterior of the whole thing then slice into thick medallions and sear those on both sides. I bet you could slice fully-cooked pork loin (not the same thing as tenderloin) from the SV and sear it in a hot pan then make a sauce from the resulting fond. If you donít try it, I might sometime.

Well now I have to look at the label of the one we bought yesterday since Iím probably gonna cook two of them, and make sure what they are because now I forget whether itís pork loin or pork tenderloin.

Iíd not be opposed to making a sauce of some sort from the fond, in fact Iíve still got some bacon bits in the cast iron from last nightís butternut squash pasta that might lend their flavor too. Not sure exactly what else to add to it, though.

Do they make pork broth?

Zarin posted:

This is what I had been doing as well. I treat it a lot like boneless skinless chicken breast, in a way.

If you get the whole loin from a Costco or something, there usually is a bit of a fat cap on it that'll sear up nice. Otherwise when I'm searing, I try to get some sort of fat or oil into the pan to help with that. Although now that I say that, I can't help but wonder if I shouldn't be considering using the grill because it likely can get a lot hotter than the pan . . . .

I donít know, if you have a cast iron they can get pretty hot even on low settingsóat least on a gas stove. In fact on a knob with 1-10 on it, at 2-3 low heat most oil reaches its smoke point in that thing, including avocado oil which is a staple in our home and the only thing I use for cooking aside from olive oil, which I donít ever use in a cast iron given its relatively low smoke point.

life is killing me fucked around with this message at 17:20 on Mar 19, 2021

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

sparkle and shine



Lawnie posted:

Not really, I donít think, itís a very lean cut without a lot of connective tissue so itís probably not very well-suited to the long cooking times of the smoker.

I smoke pork tenderloin all the time, and it turns out fine. You don't do a 12-hour smoke with it, because yeah it'll be dry, but a low smoke for a couple of hours works great and the smoke flavour is nice. I smoke from raw, but 30 mins at 225 for something post-SV would pick up a bunch of the flavour and colour without overcooking IMO.

Otherwise I sear it after SV. Have never once successfully made a bag-juice sauce, but I'm sure it's possible!

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

life is killing me posted:

Well now I have to look at the label of the one we bought yesterday since Iím probably gonna cook two of them, and make sure what they are because now I forget whether itís pork loin or pork tenderloin.

Iíd not be opposed to making a sauce of some sort from the fond, in fact Iíve still got some bacon bits in the cast iron from last nightís butternut squash pasta that might lend their flavor too. Not sure exactly what else to add to it, though.

Do they make pork broth?


I donít know, if you have a cast iron they can get pretty hot even on low settingsóat least on a gas stove. In fact on a knob with 1-10 on it, at 2-3 low heat most oil reaches its smoke point in that thing, including avocado oil which is a staple in our home and the only thing I use for cooking aside from olive oil, which I donít ever use in a cast iron given its relatively low smoke point.

A really easy sauce thatís good with pork: Deglaze with a cup of water or chicken stock/broth (pork stock is a thing but Iíve never seen it in the store), then whisk in half a cup of heavy cream followed by a tablespoon of Dijon mustard. Bring up to a simmer to thicken a bit, then remove from the heat and whisk in a pat of cold butter. The emulsion will probably be hard to start with just the water and cream, but adding the Dijon and butter really helps to stabilize the whole sauce. Obviously season to taste with salt and pepper before serving.

E:

Subjunctive posted:

I smoke pork tenderloin all the time, and it turns out fine. You don't do a 12-hour smoke with it, because yeah it'll be dry, but a low smoke for a couple of hours works great and the smoke flavour is nice. I smoke from raw, but 30 mins at 225 for something post-SV would pick up a bunch of the flavour and colour without overcooking IMO.

Otherwise I sear it after SV. Have never once successfully made a bag-juice sauce, but I'm sure it's possible!

Good to know, Iíll have to try this sometime because I seemingly always have pork tenderloin on hand. Probably should have figured treating it like chicken would be pretty good on the smoker.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Well itís pork tenderloin, so does that change things re: smoking it? Might just sear it anyway, not sure I want the hassle of smoking it tonight.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



life is killing me posted:

Well itís pork tenderloin, so does that change things re: smoking it? Might just sear it anyway, not sure I want the hassle of smoking it tonight.
If you're just going to SV and sear try this!

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007




Oh poo poo I forgot you put that on the recipe thread.

Iím gonna have to play with the temp though...my wife definitely will not eat it if it looks pink

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

sparkle and shine



Iím sorry to hear that, but I understand. Itís taken a while for me to retrain my family to judge doneness by muscle-fibre texture instead of colour.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



I went with 136 because that's what the Joule app recommended, you could go as high as 158 to eliminate pink. But you want that pink n juicy loin, lemme tell you.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Subjunctive posted:

Iím sorry to hear that, but I understand. Itís taken a while for me to retrain my family to judge doneness by muscle-fibre texture instead of colour.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD posted:

I went with 136 because that's what the Joule app recommended, you could go as high as 158 to eliminate pink. But you want that pink n juicy loin, lemme tell you.

I got made fun of in the general questions thread for having the audacity to hope my wife would accept the time-temperature curve and get over the pink

Alas, this was not the case

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



life is killing me posted:

I got made fun of in the general questions thread for having the audacity to hope my wife would accept the time-temperature curve and get over the pink

Alas, this was not the case
Maybe you could show her this?



This is Joule's visual doneness guide.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD posted:

Maybe you could show her this?



This is Joule's visual doneness guide.

I have the Joule and am using that recipe

And I've tried that

I've tried everything, time-temperature charts, food science articles

She will not eat any white meat that is still pink due to some mental block and the fact her little brother got sick for days once after eating pink pork (she even admitted to me that he'd undercooked it but she still won't eat it pink)

poo poo I even told her that ham is pink and so are parts of pulled pork

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



Well that is nitrates. SV pork will still be good at 150 though, just not as good as it could be just like regular cooked pork.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


Some people just grew up eating a certain way and don't want to change. It is frustrating to feel limited by a spouse who is (in your mind, if not necessarily in the grand scheme of things) a picky eater. I know the feeling of "ugh I can only have this when we eat out/my spouse is out of town/has other dinner plans, because only I will eat it." I guess just remember that some people prefer the familiar and to them, we're the annoying ones trying to constantly feed them weird things.

Part of it is how they grew up too. My wife won't eat chicken skin, "undercooked" red meat, spicy food, or shrimp (unless it's fried). This mirrors my MIL's own aversions and therefore what kind of food she ate and didn't as a kid.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Well here it is, sous vide pork tenderloin. 158F for 1.5hrs. A little of the sauce goes a long way, but I think it turned out pretty good.

Sportman
May 11, 2003

PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS!!!

Fun Shoe

life is killing me posted:

I have the Joule and am using that recipe

And I've tried that

I've tried everything, time-temperature charts, food science articles

She will not eat any white meat that is still pink due to some mental block and the fact her little brother got sick for days once after eating pink pork (she even admitted to me that he'd undercooked it but she still won't eat it pink)

poo poo I even told her that ham is pink and so are parts of pulled pork

I weaned my wife from 155F pork down to 140F one degree at a time. Each time I made pork, I would turn it down one degree. Worked like a charm.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Sportman posted:

I weaned my wife from 155F pork down to 140F one degree at a time. Each time I made pork, I would turn it down one degree. Worked like a charm.

So basically how you get a toddler to start falling asleep on their own

Intriguing

Hauki
May 11, 2010




Yeah, I think I've done 138-140 in the past. I haven't tried smoking a sv loin, but from doing a quick smoke on other sv meats, yeah what Subjunctive said. I've also sliced & seared off the slices, but I like the presentation more of searing the whole thing & then slicing I guess. Also that gets messier if you're stuffing it. If it's just a matter of pan size, you could also just cut the loin in half & sear off the halves, then slice though. I've done the ad hoc fig & fennel jam loin as a sv tenderloin a few times and it's still some of the best pork I've ever had.

Sportman
May 11, 2003

PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS...
PILLS!!!

Fun Shoe

life is killing me posted:

So basically how you get a toddler to start falling asleep on their own

Intriguing

She eventually figured it out, but by that point we were down like 10 degrees, and she kept commenting on how good the pork tasted.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Sportman posted:

She eventually figured it out, but by that point we were down like 10 degrees, and she kept commenting on how good the pork tasted.

And Iím sure she also noticed how she never got sick from eating it either

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018




Been trying to do sous vide hollandaise for eggs benedict, but it never turns out right. I just tried anovas recipe and my sauce just always seems to break. Does anyone have any suggestions? I know it'll come out lumpy but even after immersion blending it comes out thin and broken and not at all thick like how I imagine hollandaise.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Skyarb posted:

Been trying to do sous vide hollandaise for eggs benedict, but it never turns out right. I just tried anovas recipe and my sauce just always seems to break. Does anyone have any suggestions? I know it'll come out lumpy but even after immersion blending it comes out thin and broken and not at all thick like how I imagine hollandaise.
Is it breaking or is it just thin? If it's runny but not broken then it could just be the eggs are too old. If you get the same result from immersion blender mayo (1 cup oil, 1 egg, 1 Tbsp of mustard if that's how you roll), that's it.

If that's not it, try boiling some water and adding like a Tbsp and whisking like a motherfuck/hit it with the blender. If that fixes it then your emulsion was either too cool or your eggs were low on lecithin.

Comedy molecular/modernist option: buy a bag of lecithin powder and add a pinch to see if that helps.

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018




SubG posted:

Is it breaking or is it just thin? If it's runny but not broken then it could just be the eggs are too old. If you get the same result from immersion blender mayo (1 cup oil, 1 egg, 1 Tbsp of mustard if that's how you roll), that's it.

If that's not it, try boiling some water and adding like a Tbsp and whisking like a motherfuck/hit it with the blender. If that fixes it then your emulsion was either too cool or your eggs were low on lecithin.

Comedy molecular/modernist option: buy a bag of lecithin powder and add a pinch to see if that helps.

So I moved away from the sous vide and did Kenji Lopez's two minute hollandaise which consists of melting butter to 220F and then slowly pouring that into a cup with the yolk/water/lemon juice with an immersion blender constantly running and that absolutely did the trick, it came out beautifully. I also used about twice as much butter using this method.

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

Skyarb posted:

So I moved away from the sous vide and did Kenji Lopez's two minute hollandaise which consists of melting butter to 220F and then slowly pouring that into a cup with the yolk/water/lemon juice with an immersion blender constantly running and that absolutely did the trick, it came out beautifully. I also used about twice as much butter using this method.

Was gonna suggest this, I always make it that way.

xtal
Jan 9, 2011



I once made that recipe but misunderstood it, I started with the butter and slowly added the egg yolk. Did not work.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


I always just do hollandaise in a coffee cup in the microwave.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




I do hollandaise in a stainless steel bowl double boiler on top of the water my eggs will be / are being poached in. Turns out that whole butter and whole egg actually makes a decent emulsion.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



Joule has an "autostart timer" function, where you add the food in as soon as you pour the water bath, and when the temp is reached it starts the timer on its own. This is convenient, but is it actually safe? I've been doing this with frozen chicken.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



I donít use it because it seems like it would mess with the texture of the food...but I guess if you can leave it in the water bath after itís done, maybe the temperature increasing that way is no different. Frozen though, not sureóif you tell Joule itís frozen and then it thaws a bit and cooks from there it might be different texture than you wanted?

CleverHans
Apr 25, 2011



Yams Fan

I feel like this would depend on how much mass of frozen stuff you have, how big your water bath is, and the logic circuitry they are using.

Though, if you are just doing a couple chicken breasts separately (i.e. not frozen together into one solid mass) you should be fine.

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

In my experience frozen food is thawed in about an hour in room temp circulating water in my Anova setup. I have a very hard time believing that cooking food from frozen, which would thaw and begin cooking much, much quicker than unheated room temp water, keeps food in the danger zone for any meaningful amount of added time.

KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



My concern is that the water is being heated during the thawing process, and if the water bath is large enough that could mean a substantial amount of time in the danger zone.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017
NRA shill who thinks homeless people would love to live in migrant border camps. Help me realize I am a bigoted piece of shit.


KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD posted:

My concern is that the water is being heated during the thawing process, and if the water bath is large enough that could mean a substantial amount of time in the danger zone.

The moment you drop a frozen item into even pre-heated water, the temp plummets and the SV starts heating it back up.

CleverHans
Apr 25, 2011



Yams Fan

I should have specified: by far it is the size and shape of the meat mass that will determine how long any parts are in the danger zone.

3-4 separate vacuum sealed frozen chicken breasts clipped to different locations or floating around: no problemo

those same 4 breasts frozen into a solid sphere-o-meat: might be a problemo

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD posted:

My concern is that the water is being heated during the thawing process, and if the water bath is large enough that could mean a substantial amount of time in the danger zone.
I think you mean if the protein is large enough. Because the larger the water bath, the less the temperature will be lowered by dropping a meat ice cube in it. But unless you're really overcrowding your puddle or your puddle machine has a busted heater it's not really something you need to worry about.

Baldwin gives tables for the time to get meat up to temperature from fridge temperature and from frozen, for various shapes and thicknesses of meat. For a 25mm/1" slab the difference is ~half an hour, for a cylinder it's ~15 minutes. That is, to within rounding error (and with a couple asterisks about the size and shape), the length of time it takes for the meat to get from freezer temperature to fridge temperature. The time spend in the danger zone will be roughly the same.

Why? Those tables are to get the meat to within 1 F/0.5 C of the water temperature, and they're relatively independent of the water temperature. And why is that? Because the rate of change of the meat temperature is proportional to the temperature difference. So the curve ends up looking pretty much the same over large temperature ranges. Baldwin says that the tables are valid for the range between 110 F/ 45C and 175 F/80 C.

What are you cooking your chicken parts to? Like somewhere between 140 and 160, depending on the part of the bird and your personal preferences on poultry texture. If you're putting a couple chicken breasts in your puddle machine and it's dropping from 140 to below 110 holy poo poo get a bigger water bath because you're doing it wrong. If you're not doing it wrong and you're using a remotely sane amount of water for the food you're trying to cook, not even an issue.

Imasalmon
Mar 19, 2003

Meet me in the Hall of Fame

I've been using an Anova Precision for a few years now, and loving it. I use an old Foodsaver vacuum sealer that my folks gave me since they weren't using it and it has been fine. My wife just offered to get me this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08GZH6Y36/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glc_fabc_8EN8R4754DKTRZ4WM0NK for my birthday, since some friends of ours have one, but I wanted to get some opinions before shelling out the money. I think it would be nice to not have to worry about excess moisture before sealing, and I could do some fun things with wet ingredients, but I'm not very sophisticated with techniques, so I'm probably overlooking something.

What do y'all think?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Imasalmon posted:

I've been using an Anova Precision for a few years now, and loving it. I use an old Foodsaver vacuum sealer that my folks gave me since they weren't using it and it has been fine. My wife just offered to get me this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08GZH6Y36/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glc_fabc_8EN8R4754DKTRZ4WM0NK for my birthday, since some friends of ours have one, but I wanted to get some opinions before shelling out the money. I think it would be nice to not have to worry about excess moisture before sealing, and I could do some fun things with wet ingredients, but I'm not very sophisticated with techniques, so I'm probably overlooking something.

What do y'all think?

I suppose the real question here is: what does she want you to cook that you can't with your current sealer?

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


sous vide asparagus is p. great with a little lemon juice. think I'm gonna pick up some more what with it being $1 a pound right now.

Zarin posted:

I suppose the real question here is: what does she want you to cook that you can't with your current sealer?

chamber vacuum sealers are just a lot nicer in general. they pull a much better vacuum, they make much better seals (I've had some problems with my foodsaver not getting a good enough seal and it letting go during prolonged high-temperature cooking - 180F for an hour or two is tough, although my new one with the sous vide mode seems to work better), you can pack liquids like soups, they are designed for higher duty cycles, etc etc.

I've got no info on that one in particular, and it looks a little small (the downside to chamber vacuum sealers is that everything you're sealing has to fit inside the chamber - so you can't seal arbitrarily large things like steaks, fish filets, etc if they are too big for the chamber), but you can pick up chinese knockoffs of the bigger units for about $400 as well. You probably do want a model with an oil pump, you have to change the oil every now and then but they are heavier duty than the air-cooled ones.

Carillon
May 9, 2014





Plus with a chamber vac you can compress fruit which is rad as hell.

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Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005



Paul MaudDib posted:

sous vide asparagus is p. great with a little lemon juice. think I'm gonna pick up some more what with it being $1 a pound right now.


chamber vacuum sealers are just a lot nicer in general. they pull a much better vacuum, they make much better seals (I've had some problems with my foodsaver not getting a good enough seal and it letting go during prolonged high-temperature cooking - 180F for an hour or two is tough, although my new one with the sous vide mode seems to work better), you can pack liquids like soups, they are designed for higher duty cycles, etc etc.

I've got no info on that one in particular, and it looks a little small (the downside to chamber vacuum sealers is that everything you're sealing has to fit inside the chamber - so you can't seal arbitrarily large things like steaks, fish filets, etc if they are too big for the chamber), but you can pick up chinese knockoffs of the bigger units for about $400 as well. You probably do want a model with an oil pump, you have to change the oil every now and then but they are heavier duty than the air-cooled ones.

Iíve been using my VacMaster VP120 for over a decade. Itís not an oil pump, just regular air or whatever. Works great. Plenty big and powerful enough.

Of course now that I say that is the week it finally dies. At least I should probably put new teflon tape on the seal bar. Itís pretty old...

Camber sealers are totally rad though. So many things you can do. Sous vide. Compress fruits. Remove bubbles from alginate solutions or blended eggs (for sous vide omelettes).

I put a loaf of sourdough in there right after it came out of the (Anova precision) oven. Impossibly crackly skin with amazing soft interior.

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