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Dane
Jun 18, 2003

mmm... creamy.


Chemmy posted:

Liquor doesn't age in glass bottles, generally only in wooden casks.

Without having any science to back me up, I do believe that the difference here is whether you are talking about distilled spirits or infused spirits. As there will still be a lot of flavouring agents remaining in, say, a nitrous whipper infusion compared to a distilled spirit, even if the infusion has been thoroughly strained and cheesecloth'd; the infusion will change flavour profile over time even in the bottle.

At least that's my experience with my home infusions. Some "experts" recommend aging walnut infusions for 7+ years, and the one I found of my father's from 1977 has a completely different feel, fragrance and taste than the one I made in 2010.

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Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





The Anova is great and versatile. Every cut of beef I've thrown at it comes back perfect. Rare tri-tip and falling-off-the-bone pork ribs are consistently impressive. That salmon is still the best though.


I ended up settling on a Caso Hand-Held Vacuum Sealer ($40 on sale) and an extra set of its proprietary large bags. The bags can be washed and reused. Here's hoping I don't suck up a bunch of juice and ruin it on my first try.

MeKeV
Aug 10, 2010


Does anyone have insider info on the Sansaire? Their last blog post and twitter updates are from 26th October. New purchases are still indicating 18th November.

Dane
Jun 18, 2003

mmm... creamy.


MeKeV posted:

Does anyone have insider info on the Sansaire? Their last blog post and twitter updates are from 26th October. New purchases are still indicating 18th November.

[quote]If everything goes 100% according to plan, we’ll send out the very first units in the last week of November[quote]

I tweeted @seattlefoodgeek about the new purchases date and he said he'd fix it. SHrug.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!

If the Nomiku is any indication, it takes a buttwhile to go from kickstart to market with a kitchen device. The Sansaire schedule seemed very aggressive when I looked at it; it's a shame they're not being more open about it.

Question:
I made some short ribs this weekend. Browned 'em, salted and peppered 'em, and popped them into plastic baggies with a sprig of thyme for 72 hours at 57.2 C. I then put them in the fridge overnight (we were going out to eat with a guest that I didn't realize would be staying the whole weekend) and reheated them this evening. They smelled very strong. "Marrowy" is the world my girlfriend used. The meat had a great texture and tasted wonderful, but the strong smell was off-putting. I did leave the bone attached. Should I have removed that? Anything I should have done different?

granpa yum
Jul 15, 2004


Safety Dance posted:

If the Nomiku is any indication, it takes a buttwhile to go from kickstart to market with a kitchen device. The Sansaire schedule seemed very aggressive when I looked at it; it's a shame they're not being more open about it.

Question:
I made some short ribs this weekend. Browned 'em, salted and peppered 'em, and popped them into plastic baggies with a sprig of thyme for 72 hours at 57.2 C. I then put them in the fridge overnight (we were going out to eat with a guest that I didn't realize would be staying the whole weekend) and reheated them this evening. They smelled very strong. "Marrowy" is the world my girlfriend used. The meat had a great texture and tasted wonderful, but the strong smell was off-putting. I did leave the bone attached. Should I have removed that? Anything I should have done different?

That happens to me with longer cook times and "gamier" meats. I'm not sure how to avoid it, I've read that some people rinse meat prior to cooking but I don't know if that would introduce bacteria and using distilled water would get old quick. It never seems to affect the safety of the meat, just adds the off-putting aroma. I've also read that it may be "offal" flavors coming out from cuts located near organs but I don't know if that's true at all.

brunch with yr parents
Jan 6, 2013


granpa yum posted:

That happens to me with longer cook times and "gamier" meats. I'm not sure how to avoid it, I've read that some people rinse meat prior to cooking but I don't know if that would introduce bacteria and using distilled water would get old quick. It never seems to affect the safety of the meat, just adds the off-putting aroma. I've also read that it may be "offal" flavors coming out from cuts located near organs but I don't know if that's true at all.

I'm in hour 64 of my first 72 hour cook so was reading up on technique this week. According to modernist cuisine at home, pre-searing on a long cook can produce off flavors, so they suggest waiting until they come out to brown.

granpa yum
Jul 15, 2004


cooter64 posted:

I'm in hour 64 of my first 72 hour cook so was reading up on technique this week. According to modernist cuisine at home, pre-searing on a long cook can produce off flavors, so they suggest waiting until they come out to brown.

I never brown meat before I put it in, always after.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

So I roasted a chicken tonight and was thinking...what about sous vide whole chicken? Legs and breasts cooked the same temp. Only problem is it would have the texture of crock pot chicken and no crispy skin. To correct that, either a torch or dry it off and throw it under the broiler for a bit maybe?

Am I completely insane here?

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Safety Dance posted:

Question:
I made some short ribs this weekend. Browned 'em, salted and peppered 'em, and popped them into plastic baggies with a sprig of thyme for 72 hours at 57.2 C. I then put them in the fridge overnight (we were going out to eat with a guest that I didn't realize would be staying the whole weekend) and reheated them this evening. They smelled very strong. "Marrowy" is the world my girlfriend used. The meat had a great texture and tasted wonderful, but the strong smell was off-putting. I did leave the bone attached. Should I have removed that? Anything I should have done different?

Did you chill it in an ice bath properly after cooking it before putting it in the fridge?

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



nwin posted:

So I roasted a chicken tonight and was thinking...what about sous vide whole chicken? Legs and breasts cooked the same temp. Only problem is it would have the texture of crock pot chicken and no crispy skin. To correct that, either a torch or dry it off and throw it under the broiler for a bit maybe?

Am I completely insane here?

You have to break it down, you need good thermal contact. Technically I guess you could just fill the bag with enough fat to heat everything, but you can't just vac seal a whole chicken and dump it in there with empty space.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

You have to break it down, you need good thermal contact. Technically I guess you could just fill the bag with enough fat to heat everything, but you can't just vac seal a whole chicken and dump it in there with empty space.

Makes perfect sense. Thank you!

lightpole
Jun 4, 2004


EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

You have to break it down, you need good thermal contact. Technically I guess you could just fill the bag with enough fat to heat everything, but you can't just vac seal a whole chicken and dump it in there with empty space.

You could probably just cut it right down the middle and maybe take off wings and drumsticks but at that point it's probably easier to just roast the chicken.

Made some roots that turned out excellent. Just tossed the good ones in, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, carrot, celery root, pepper, salt and some butter and they came out excellent. I could have gone with some sugar as well and glazed them after but I forgot and it was late. As it was I really enjoyed the simple flavor without sugar, they are generally sweet enough.

lightpole fucked around with this message at Nov 12, 2013 around 03:50

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

nwin posted:

So I roasted a chicken tonight and was thinking...what about sous vide whole chicken? Legs and breasts cooked the same temp. Only problem is it would have the texture of crock pot chicken and no crispy skin. To correct that, either a torch or dry it off and throw it under the broiler for a bit maybe?

Am I completely insane here?

Best thing to do for that kind of cook is to bag everything individually, cook the thighs for 2 hours at the higher temp, drop the water temp to the temp you want for the breasts cook them for an hour.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



I dunno, I love my puddle machine but a roast chicken is something that comes out pretty well in the oven.

NoDamage
Dec 2, 2000


Holy crap short ribs at 140F for 48 hours are absolutely amazing. I only salt + peppered them before putting them in. After 48 hours I took them out, cut them from the bone and seared in a cast iron skillet, and used the juices to make a sauce.

They came out unbelievably tender, and not dry at all like you might get with a traditional braise. This is definitely my favorite sous vide application so far.

LTBS
Oct 9, 2003

Big Pimpin, Spending the G's

NoDamage posted:

Holy crap short ribs at 140F for 48 hours are absolutely amazing. I only salt + peppered them before putting them in. After 48 hours I took them out, cut them from the bone and seared in a cast iron skillet, and used the juices to make a sauce.

They came out unbelievably tender, and not dry at all like you might get with a traditional braise. This is definitely my favorite sous vide application so far.

I think that's close to all I've done with my Anova. I love short ribs. I've been doing them at 144 or 142F for 72 hours.

r0ck0
Sep 12, 2004
r0ck0s p0zt m0d3rn lyf

To add my first SV experience. I used an 8 quart crockpot and the dorkfood controller to SV a couple of lamb steaks. Costco had a prepackaged vacuum sealed pair of lamb steaks already seasoned with herbs and spices. I took the vacuum sealed package from the store and dropped it in the crock pot at 135 degrees for 4 hours. After they were done I seared them on the grill and my daughter said they were better than "real" steaks. Very easy and very good. Next up is short ribs!

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

Did you chill it in an ice bath properly after cooking it before putting it in the fridge?

Nope. I don't have an ice maker, so I stuck them in the freezer for ~30 minutes before moving them to the fridge. I'm reasonably comfortable that they were in the danger zone for a sufficiently small amount of time, as it wasn't a lot of food.

SirRobin
Mar 2, 2002



Anova have updated their store. 220 volt versions are available - non-USAians rejoice! Time to order me one!

Safety Dance posted:

I don't have an ice maker, so I stuck them in the freezer...

Somewhere at home I have a recipe for making ice with a freezer. Should I post it for you?

Sub Rosa
Jun 9, 2010



Why are you guys doing short ribs at 140+? 72 hours at 130F is like my religion, why go higher?

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Safety Dance posted:

Nope. I don't have an ice maker, so I stuck them in the freezer for ~30 minutes before moving them to the fridge. I'm reasonably comfortable that they were in the danger zone for a sufficiently small amount of time, as it wasn't a lot of food.

This is probably fine, but putting stuff in the freezer is way slower than tossing the bag in ice water because in the freezer the meat isn't surrounded by cold liquid which cools faster than air.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!

SirRobin posted:

Somewhere at home I have a recipe for making ice with a freezer. Should I post it for you?

Only if it's quick. I'm terrible at planning ahead.

Genewiz
Nov 21, 2005
oh darling...

Safety Dance posted:

Only if it's quick. I'm terrible at planning ahead.

Get a suitably sized stainless steel bowl, fill it 1/3 with water. Put in freezer. When you need it, take it out, and fill it out with water. The ice will melt a little and float and thus, ice cold water. Of course, you'll be needing some excess freezer space.

NoDamage
Dec 2, 2000


Sub Rosa posted:

Why are you guys doing short ribs at 140+? 72 hours at 130F is like my religion, why go higher?
140F for 48 hours produces a texture I'm pretty happy with, plus one day less wait. I might try varying temps/times though just to see what my favorite result is.

Seriously though, short ribs are a mandatory SV experience. With a reasonably fatty cut the result is quite reminiscent of Kobe beef in terms of tenderness and fattiness.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I cooked up an extra boneless, skinless chicken breast last night, 2.5h @ 143* F.

Plunged it into a bowl of water with two large blue ice bricks...and then promptly fell asleep for 7 hours before I awoke and found it in the kitchen.

The water was still extremely cold and the meat should have been pasteurized but I need a second opinion if I should keep it or not.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


BraveUlysses posted:

I cooked up an extra boneless, skinless chicken breast last night, 2.5h @ 143* F.

Plunged it into a bowl of water with two large blue ice bricks...and then promptly fell asleep for 7 hours before I awoke and found it in the kitchen.

The water was still extremely cold and the meat should have been pasteurized but I need a second opinion if I should keep it or not.

If extremely cold is under 40F then it's safe.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



BraveUlysses posted:

I cooked up an extra boneless, skinless chicken breast last night, 2.5h @ 143* F.

Plunged it into a bowl of water with two large blue ice bricks...and then promptly fell asleep for 7 hours before I awoke and found it in the kitchen.

The water was still extremely cold and the meat should have been pasteurized but I need a second opinion if I should keep it or not.

Hit the water with a thermometer.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

forgot to test the temp before i took it out of the water and threw it in the fridge.

i'll probably toss it just to be safe, not a big loss.

lightpole
Jun 4, 2004


Sous Vide, more like forget about your food when it's done.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


lightpole posted:

Sous Vide, more like forget about your food when it's done.

This has yet to happen to me, but then again I put my ice bath in my fridge specifically so it doesn't happen to me!

MeKeV
Aug 10, 2010


I'm tempted to cancel my Sansaire pre order from a month a go, and just go with an Anova.
Shipping seems a bit steep at $70 to the UK with the Anova, but the Sansaire gang have gone so quiet, I'll be VERY surprised if I receive it this year now.

Reviews have only been from preproduction models of the Sansaire, but there's really not that much between the two of them is there. I'd prefer not to have to deal with a touch screen, but I'm sure I can live with it.

Is it worth me hanging on until the 18th to see if we do get any more updates, or should I just go make the switch?
My worry is I'd imagine an unsatisfactory update from sansaire over the next couple of weeks could see a load of people quickly going for the Anova instead and hitting their stock levels, where I might miss out on one of them too if I'm not quick enough!

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Kenji tries out sousvide+fried turkey porchetta

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/11/...-porchetta.html

This is your solution to the "cavernous birds don't cook well in sous vide" problem. Also solves the dry/tough turkey issue.

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Nov 14, 2013 around 18:22

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

That thing looks great but I'm going to test out the pork belly version this week and if it goes well, i'm making it for thanksgiving too.

Nicol Bolas
Feb 13, 2009


How about sous vide turkey breast for thanksgiving? I'm already confiting the legs.

Here is my tentative plan:

I whack the breasts off, brine them for 24 hours, ziplock them individually sans skin (save the skin), drop zliplocks into a cooler full of 140 degree water, watch the temp like a hawk and adjust with more boiling water and keep it at 140F (based on this), and then broil / crisp skin and perhaps the breasts themselves, slice, and serve.

An issue: the turkeys (two of them; I feed a lot of people) are about 20 pounds each, so these are rather large breasts I'm cooking and I have no idea how long to sous vide them for in order to cook to 140 the whole way through. This instructable says a minimum of three hours but I'm not sure. Does all day make sense? (10am to 6pm?) Will that result in baby food?

Is there something basic and obvious wrong with this plan? I plan to do a test run but I've never puddled before and I don't want to kill all my friends / prepare something gross.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


The turchetta linked is breast so I have no idea why you even ask!

Nicol Bolas
Feb 13, 2009


deimos posted:

The turchetta linked is breast so I have no idea why you even ask!

I looked up the recipe and I think I have a grasp on it, but goons tend to enumerate details that recipes leave out.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

SeriousEats always puts the recipe on a separate page from the article, which I kind of find annoying but here's the step by step:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...tta-recipe.html

And the traditional turchetta since he refers to step #5 in that one:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/11/...ing-recipe.html

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


BraveUlysses posted:

That thing looks great but I'm going to test out the pork belly version this week and if it goes well, i'm making it for thanksgiving too.

Maaan, I wasn't too impressed by the pork belly version. The fat got too...weird. That said, I'm going to do a dry run of a turkey breast this weekend, with a pan-sear finish. 146F for however long to pasteurize, with the rub in the middle and trussed.

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Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





When I do previously frozen turkey breast that way it loses a bunch of water that just ends up in the bag. It makes for a delicious gravy or something to baste it with on the plate but in my experiments sous vide turkey isn't yet the juiciest turkey I've ever had.

Fancy hippy food store had a sale on these brined ready-to-cook turkey breasts that are already vacuum sealed in thick plastic. I've found tri-tip packaged this way before and lightly seasoned it before finishing. Edge-to-edge perfect and juicy with little effort.


Also some of the best duck I've had.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Nov 15, 2013 around 06:30

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