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ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Drunk Driver Dad posted:

Also it's apparently fine to sous vide ground beef around 132-135? May try a little lower temp next time to see how it turns out.

Anywhere from 115-155 depending on what you want per Serious Eats, although frankly I wouldn't go below 140 for ground beef personally.
https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/08...rger.html#chart

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Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

At dinner last night we had some amazing confit carrots. The restaurant just maintains a cauldron of melted butter, but agreed that it would work sous vide at smaller scale. I’ve only been able to find stovetop confit carrot recipes, which call for 275F. I see recipes for garlic that do 7hrs at 190F, which I might use as a starting point. Has anyone else attempted this?

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007
deadlift minimalist

Subjunctive posted:

At dinner last night we had some amazing confit carrots. The restaurant just maintains a cauldron of melted butter, but agreed that it would work sous vide at smaller scale. I’ve only been able to find stovetop confit carrot recipes, which call for 275F. I see recipes for garlic that do 7hrs at 190F, which I might use as a starting point. Has anyone else attempted this?

This recipe is delicious:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes...ots-recipe.html

Omit the sugar and add whatever herbs you prefer before the 'reduce the liquid' stage if you're into that.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Agree that recipe is good. I often do it very simple, 83C, carrots and butter in the bag, a minute or so in the frying pan.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



So after quite a few amazing puddled dinners, my wife brings home assorted meats and poultry. I went ahead and began to season and vac seal beforefreezing and out of the blue she asked “I planned to do these on the grill, do we have to sous vide everything?”

I really didn’t have an answer that would not have come out sounding like
Has anyone else had a significant other get tired of food being cooked perfectly?

Hasselblad fucked around with this message at Feb 19, 2019 around 04:50

couldcareless
Feb 8, 2009

Spheal used Swagger!

Sometimes grilling is just good fun. Obviously you can finish on the grill, but who wants to go outside and watch you sear something off on it for 30 seconds.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Hasselblad posted:

Has anyone else had a significant other get tired of food being cooked perfectly?

I don't like to sous vide everything. Even doneness isn't always the best way.

Whalley
Mar 5, 2004

Drinking shows a real commitment to becoming a cooler person!


Yeah, puddling is fun and useful but it's just a tool in a repertoire, not the one stop answer to all.

Like, grilling for an entire cook is going to give you different flavors and textures and cooking experiences than just finishing on a grill. I'm with your wife here, change it up some

snyprmag
Oct 9, 2005



You can get pretty close to the even doneness of SV with indirect heat and a good thermometer.

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Indirect and low heat, importantly. If you’re indirect at 450F you’re definitely going to get a meaningful gradient. Indirect at 250F much less so.

Skyarb
Sep 20, 2018


So I just tried duck breast for hte first time. I left the breast uncovered overnight in the fridge. Scored the skin/fat. Seasoned with salt and pepper, bagged and puddled @ 135 for 2 hours. Then I took it out, dabbed it, fridge air dried it for a bit, then I put it on a cold cast iron, heated it up to a medium heat and cooked it for 5 minutes skin side down then finished the rest of the meat for ~30 seconds.

It definitely seemed like the fat was rendering since my cast iron was dry when I put the duck in but pretty oiled up in what I am assuming was rendered fat which made searing the meat easy after I had crisped the skin. And the skin was relatively crisped and browned.

Although the meat was delicious and perfect, the skin/fat was still chewy. I guess I didn't render it well enough, I'm really not sure what else to do though...

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Skyarb posted:

So I just tried duck breast for hte first time. I left the breast uncovered overnight in the fridge. Scored the skin/fat. Seasoned with salt and pepper, bagged and puddled @ 135 for 2 hours. Then I took it out, dabbed it, fridge air dried it for a bit, then I put it on a cold cast iron, heated it up to a medium heat and cooked it for 5 minutes skin side down then finished the rest of the meat for ~30 seconds.

It definitely seemed like the fat was rendering since my cast iron was dry when I put the duck in but pretty oiled up in what I am assuming was rendered fat which made searing the meat easy after I had crisped the skin. And the skin was relatively crisped and browned.

Although the meat was delicious and perfect, the skin/fat was still chewy. I guess I didn't render it well enough, I'm really not sure what else to do though...

Maybe remove the skin and crisp it separately? That or just render it longer, maybe lower heat.

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Skyarb posted:

So I just tried duck breast for hte first time. I left the breast uncovered overnight in the fridge. Scored the skin/fat. Seasoned with salt and pepper, bagged and puddled @ 135 for 2 hours. Then I took it out, dabbed it, fridge air dried it for a bit, then I put it on a cold cast iron, heated it up to a medium heat and cooked it for 5 minutes skin side down then finished the rest of the meat for ~30 seconds.

It definitely seemed like the fat was rendering since my cast iron was dry when I put the duck in but pretty oiled up in what I am assuming was rendered fat which made searing the meat easy after I had crisped the skin. And the skin was relatively crisped and browned.

Although the meat was delicious and perfect, the skin/fat was still chewy. I guess I didn't render it well enough, I'm really not sure what else to do though...

Chefsteps suggest doing a pre and post sear to maximize rendering of the fat and cripsy skin goodness.

D'artagnan has one too. No pre sear though. I'd trust chefsteps more IMO.

ColHannibal
Sep 17, 2007


Flash Gordon Ramsay posted:

Two schools of thought:

•You're a noob for not wanting to do it on the stove. It's easy enough on the stove and why do you need a separate appliance for that you lazy person you
•Rice cookers make great rice by pressing one button. Even the cheap ones will give you excellent results with zero effort or babysitting

I'm in the latter camp.

I no longer have to devote a burner to rice.

Infinite Karma
Oct 23, 2004
Good as dead

A good rice cooker (induction heating and pressure cooking) gets results that you can't get no matter how hard you try in normal stovetop pots. More evenly cooked throughout the pot, and more evenly cooked within the individual grains. Plus there's a convenience factor, and the warming functions that help with getting a whole meal ready at the same time.

A cheap one... yeah, it's just more convenient.

5436
Jul 11, 2003

UGGGGH MOOSE

Does anyone have a Thomas Keller recipe for sous vide beef short ribs?

incontinence 100
Dec 21, 2018


5436 posted:

Does anyone have a Thomas Keller recipe for sous vide beef short ribs?

Is it better than David Chang's?

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005
I only have canyoneyes for you

Puddle cookers,
I just bought a Foodsaver Game Sealer for $55 on sale. I've heard that the precut 3 side sealed bags are much less hassle than the rolls. Any recommendations for gallon vacuum bags from Amazon?

Whalley
Mar 5, 2004

Drinking shows a real commitment to becoming a cooler person!


canyoneer posted:

Puddle cookers,
I just bought a Foodsaver Game Sealer for $55 on sale. I've heard that the precut 3 side sealed bags are much less hassle than the rolls. Any recommendations for gallon vacuum bags from Amazon?
"much" is a bit of a stretch; the only difference I've found is that with the roll, you have to seal one end before you put anything in.

I bought these a while ago: https://www.amazon.com/Vacuum-Gallo...e/dp/B074W2QDJN

They work just fine, but honestly I find myself going to a roll I was gifted more than them so that I can choose the size of the bag I'm using.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



Beginning to get mightily pissed at my foodsaver. No matter how well the seal looks when put into the freezer I am pulling the frozen portions out with tons of air in the bag. Some are fine, but others have enough that parts are drying out/freezer burnt. It is either the bags not sealing well enough, or the bag when frozen cracking or tearing slightly.

This is a relatively recent development and I am suspecting the bags themselves rather than the sealer unit.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Hasselblad posted:

Beginning to get mightily pissed at my foodsaver. No matter how well the seal looks when put into the freezer I am pulling the frozen portions out with tons of air in the bag. Some are fine, but others have enough that parts are drying out/freezer burnt. It is either the bags not sealing well enough, or the bag when frozen cracking or tearing slightly.

This is a relatively recent development and I am suspecting the bags themselves rather than the sealer unit.

You should be able to narrow down your two options by sealing something that's not perishable and leaving it somewhere other than your freezer.

I had my first Foodsaver bag fail recently, but fortunately it was just some dry beans and I caught it while they were on the counter instead of in storage, so I rebagged it without a problem.

dalstrs
Mar 11, 2004

At least this way my kill will have some use

Dinosaur Gum

canyoneer posted:

Puddle cookers,
I just bought a Foodsaver Game Sealer for $55 on sale. I've heard that the precut 3 side sealed bags are much less hassle than the rolls. Any recommendations for gallon vacuum bags from Amazon?

I bought this: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product...e?ie=UTF8&psc=1

and I haven't touched a roll since. Never had one tear or leak on me (though I always use something to keep bone ends from touching the bag).

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



poeticoddity posted:

You should be able to narrow down your two options by sealing something that's not perishable and leaving it somewhere other than your freezer.

I had my first Foodsaver bag fail recently, but fortunately it was just some dry beans and I caught it while they were on the counter instead of in storage, so I rebagged it without a problem.

One was literally split pea soup.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Hasselblad posted:

One was literally split pea soup.

Did you freeze it before or after vacuum sealing it?
I can't see a way that a vacuum sealed bag filled with a liquid wouldn't split as soon as it froze just due to expansion.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



poeticoddity posted:

Did you freeze it before or after vacuum sealing it?
I can't see a way that a vacuum sealed bag filled with a liquid wouldn't split as soon as it froze just due to expansion.

Because vacuum sealing something is not filling the bag as much as it is sucking the excess air out. There is plenty of room for expansion and I have done it the same way for years now. Also, unless I am mistaken things expand when heated, not cooled.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Water expands when it's frozen though, and soups are mostly water.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



RandomPauI posted:

Water expands when it's frozen though, and soups are mostly water.

Again, there is plenty of space in the vac seal bags, only with the air sucked out. I leave a lot of "slack" when filling the bags.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Yeah, I was getting a bit pedantic there. Sorry about that.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Hasselblad posted:

Again, there is plenty of space in the vac seal bags, only with the air sucked out. I leave a lot of "slack" when filling the bags.

While the volume of a frozen soup is going to be less than the volume of the evacuated bag, the soup is only able to expand in one dimension without stretching and weakening the side walls of the bag or your seals, but it's going to expand in all three dimensions. There are containers that can handle this but they're generally either capable of stretching (like reusable ice packs) or significantly stronger (like freezer safe mason jars).

It's entirely possible they're fine for the task, but if you're having bag failures on frozen liquids and you're not having them in other situations, that'd be the first place I looked to diagnose the point of failure.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



poeticoddity posted:

While the volume of a frozen soup is going to be less than the volume of the evacuated bag, the soup is only able to expand in one dimension without stretching and weakening the side walls of the bag or your seals, but it's going to expand in all three dimensions. There are containers that can handle this but they're generally either capable of stretching (like reusable ice packs) or significantly stronger (like freezer safe mason jars).

It's entirely possible they're fine for the task, but if you're having bag failures on frozen liquids and you're not having them in other situations, that'd be the first place I looked to diagnose the point of failure.

Hasselblad posted:

One was literally split pea soup.

Hasselblad posted:

I have done it the same way for years now.

Again, never had an issue with this happening with soups/chilis in the past. I suspect that the bag design is thinner now. While it happened to this one soup, it has also begun to happen with chicken breasts, fish filets as well. The plastic simply seems less durable now.

qutius
Apr 2, 2003
NO PARTIES


God dammit, I put in a nice looking bavette into the bath last night, set the alarm for about 2 hours, then promptly forgot about it even when the alarm went off due to reasons.

The second alarm went off in my head as I was getting ready for bed and pulled the drat thing out, ended up in the water for about 5 hours. Going to sear some up when I get home later but I suspect I hosed that one up...

I'm sorry, tasty looking bavette

BeastOfExmoor
Aug 19, 2003
"Mr. Phillips found old Johnny Cash when he was high, high before he ever took those pills, and he's still too proud to die.."

Hasselblad posted:

Beginning to get mightily pissed at my foodsaver. No matter how well the seal looks when put into the freezer I am pulling the frozen portions out with tons of air in the bag. Some are fine, but others have enough that parts are drying out/freezer burnt. It is either the bags not sealing well enough, or the bag when frozen cracking or tearing slightly.

This is a relatively recent development and I am suspecting the bags themselves rather than the sealer unit.

I had this issue with my Food Saver when I first got it. The issue seemed to be caused by small amounts of liquid causing the bag seal to be compromised during the vacuum procedure. I was able to mitigate it by just adding a second seal to the bag after I vacuumed, which typically held. I think the bags I was using at the time exasperated the problem.

Whalley
Mar 5, 2004

Drinking shows a real commitment to becoming a cooler person!


BeastOfExmoor posted:

I had this issue with my Food Saver when I first got it. The issue seemed to be caused by small amounts of liquid causing the bag seal to be compromised during the vacuum procedure. I was able to mitigate it by just adding a second seal to the bag after I vacuumed, which typically held. I think the bags I was using at the time exasperated the problem.
Yeah I double seal my bags every time just out of paranoia, and have yet to have a break. Seal once, pull the bag out a bit so the seal is outside the vacuum, then seal again.

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017



Whalley posted:

Yeah I double seal my bags every time just out of paranoia, and have yet to have a break. Seal once, pull the bag out a bit so the seal is outside the vacuum, then seal again.

Same. Pretty much always double seal with moist setting.

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005
I only have canyoneyes for you

Pull out and repeat if moist

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

I've never tried to sous vide something this big before; it's 4kg. How should this one go? The butcher said that it wouldn't need to be sous vided because it's wagyu, but that claim is suspect to me because it's still chuck, even if it's wagyu. I was thinking 24h at 134 F? Should I go with a different time/temp? The guests will be here in less than 48 hours so I can't do a 48 hour cook, although right now there's time to get close to that number.

I googled around and it said that if it comes from near the ribeye, then it's practically a ribeye and can just be cooked for a few hours, but I'm not sure if a chuck eye is from near the ribeye.


Argue fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2019 around 14:02

Sentient Data
Aug 31, 2011

My molecule scrambler ray will disintegrate your armor with one blow!


Take a slice of the meat and see how marbled it looks. Chuck is a cut, wagyu is supposed to be a breed. If it's super marbled, if go for a more standard cooking method that would better render the fat throughout; if it looks like any old cut of chuck, I'd puddle it and never trust the butcher again

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


I would not SV that in one piece, thick af. Cut it into at least three if you go that route.

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

Looks pretty marbled.




Until I move into my new place, the only cooking utilities available to me are a sous vide bath, an induction plate, and a blowtorch, so I don't think I can go with a more traditional way of cooking this.


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

I would not SV that in one piece, thick af. Cut it into at least three if you go that route.

How long and at what temp should I go for if I cut it into 3? I know chuck needs to have a long cook, but I don't know how to balance that out with the butcher telling us it's tender.

Edit: 3 pieces would make three 2-inch steaks, and also we apparently have a slow cooker that I've never used

Argue fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2019 around 14:39

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Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Don't use a crockpot on that yo.

You'll need to do at least 131/132 so your 134 will work with that much fat in the SV bath to break it down. I've done chuck for 24 hours, internet says 24-36, but people have posted 48's here as well iirc. Quick ice bath and sear with the plate and maybe blowtorch depending on how metal you wanna get.

Do three batches and report back 24, 36, 48 hours for

/e in retrospect, the 24 hour was good, but I'll do 36 when I chuck again.

Submarine Sandpaper fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2019 around 14:51

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