Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Post
  • Reply
Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Sous vide salmon is the the best way to eat salmon. I won't order a salmon steak or cooked salmon fillet anywhere because it will never turn out as nicely as doing myself at home. At its best the inside of a sous vide salmon filet is soft and rare like sushi but buttery and flaky like perfectly cooked salmon. Serve with seasonal veggies or greens.

This video shows off the basics. It's harder to do it perfectly consistently in a sink, bathtub, or cooler.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYGYyZcm6kE

But it really doesn't cover it in-depth and there are a lot of small things you can do to make it better. Brining the fish for as little as an hour makes an amazing difference in texture and only a subtle difference in taste.

Here is an amazing recipe from an amazing book that will make some of the best fish you ever ate:

http://modernistcuisine.com/recipes...e-kitchen-sink/

quote:

To reach a core temperature of 45 C / 113 F, a 2.5 cm / 1 in thick piece of salmon will take about 25 minutes. A thinner piece may take as little as 12 minutes, while a thicker piece may take 30 minutes or more.
Our favorite temperature is 45 C / 113 F, which is rare. But you can go up as high as 52 C / 126 F for a firm texture.

There are a variety of spices you can use too, the spice mix on that page is too specific for me. I like rosemary and a little white pepper but dill or peppercorns are also good. I also like to finish it in a pan for 10 seconds using the oil it cooked in rather than butter.





Steve Yun, please edit this sous vide cooker into the OP:



Many Hot tubs can reach and hold high temperatures within a decent tolerance. 45 C / 113 F isn't too hot for some people and a ziplock bag full of salmon makes for a gross great party trick.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2013 around 12:57

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I think I've read somewhere that the bones can act like heating pipes and spread heat faster. Anyway here's this.



e:

Ultimate Mango posted:

Wait a second, do you have a searchable digital copy of this book? How did that happen?

hi-res scan, pdf software with (usually shoddy) word recognition.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Oct 28, 2013 around 09:59

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





CarrKnight posted:

I am a bit confused by this technique but I have a PID controller so I might try it out.
What confuses me is the temperature to keep to make it safe.
'
I have some salmon in my freezer, I'd like to cook it medium rare (say 45 celsius). Should I just cook it sous vide for 2 hours and done? What confuses me is that the pasteurization tables here say to keep the salmon at 55 celsius for hours to kill of the bacteria. What would I do with such overcooked salmon later though?

I'm not sure what that table is all about. Even further down on the page it says 108F (42C) for rare salmon, so I don't get what they mean by pasteurized.
e: From the salmon recipe:

quote:

It is safer to use previously frozen fish than fresh fish. Because fish will be inedible if cooked to pasteurization temperatures, the fish in this recipe wont be pasteurized. Professionally freezing fish, however, kills most pathogens that are found in fish. Never serve lightly cooked food to immunocompromisedpeople.
Yeah so like eating sushi, be careful! These low temperatures kill most everything you'd worry about but it's still not fit for the boy in the plastic bubble. Don't use old unfrozen fish and practice your best food safety. When in doubt cook longer.

Overcooking sous vide at a low temperature might result in some way too soft meat. Maybe thaw it out in cool or room temperature water (why not the brine?) before using the hot water bath?

What you really care about is core temperature. Let it cook for as long as you want and when you think it might be done open the bag and stab the center with an instant-read electric thermometer. If you get your target temperature then finish it, otherwise try to submerge-vacuum and seal it back up.


There are special tapes or gums you can use so you that can stab a thermometer right through the bag. This could be nice if you're some kind of scientist with a probe thermometer.


http://www.sousvidecooking.org/tag/external-probe/

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Oct 28, 2013 around 12:16

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Reiterpallasch posted:

My Dorkfood came in earlier this week, and I ended up attempting steak--a NY strip, at 130 degrees for a hour. It came out good, but I had trouble putting a good sear on it with only a minute on each side in my cast iron skillet. I ended up giving it a little more time to develop a crust, and that ended up bringing more gray into the steaks than I really care for. Does anyone have any tips for developing a crust, fast?

I hear you're supposed to use a high temperature non-butane blowtorch. Too much effort and money for me though.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I was doing short ribs in the anova and one of the bags with a small bit of air in it floated and rested on the heating element. A punctured bag in my kitchen!? Hope I can clean its heating and circulating element easily enough.

Weigh down your bags.

The dog really enjoyed it.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Nov 3, 2013 around 20:26

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





This might be an awful question but can anyone suggest a vacuum sealer and bags that would work for both sous vide cooking and packing clothing super tight? I'm in the market for both and it would be nice to consolidate.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





The Anova is great and versatile. Every cut of beef I've thrown at it comes back perfect. Rare tri-tip and falling-off-the-bone pork ribs are consistently impressive. That salmon is still the best though.


I ended up settling on a Caso Hand-Held Vacuum Sealer ($40 on sale) and an extra set of its proprietary large bags. The bags can be washed and reused. Here's hoping I don't suck up a bunch of juice and ruin it on my first try.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





When I do previously frozen turkey breast that way it loses a bunch of water that just ends up in the bag. It makes for a delicious gravy or something to baste it with on the plate but in my experiments sous vide turkey isn't yet the juiciest turkey I've ever had.

Fancy hippy food store had a sale on these brined ready-to-cook turkey breasts that are already vacuum sealed in thick plastic. I've found tri-tip packaged this way before and lightly seasoned it before finishing. Edge-to-edge perfect and juicy with little effort.


Also some of the best duck I've had.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Nov 15, 2013 around 06:30

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I always have low-effort awesome stock ready. Thanks puddle machine!

I wonder if the 220-volt international version of the Anova works any better for heating? Sometimes mine makes a loud noise and I have to turn it off and on again. I didn't see anything about it in the instructions and it's easy to take apart, clean, and put back together. Not sure what causes it.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Ultimate Mango posted:

How do you do sous vide stock? I just spent all day durning a dozen turkey wings into six cups of stock for gravy, and if I every et my sansaire and there's an easier way, I'm all for it!

In a small to medium serving of meat or veggies I normally only get a half cup to a cup of stock each. If I "overcook" stuff it tends to lose a lot more liquid. At first my sous vide turkey was coming out way too dry because all the juice and some of the fat just end up in the bag.

On the last page Fuzzy Pipe Wrench described just throwing a bunch of veggies in "all day at 183F/83C" (kind of hot imo) and getting a psuedo-veggie stock. I threw a bunch of veggies in and had a good base for a low sodium wonton soup. There is no reason you couldn't turn a cut of meat into a good stock like this.

Use a sharpie and painter's tape to write the date on the bag or container you put the stock in. Use it within a couple weeks.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Nov 26, 2013 around 04:21

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Scott Bakula posted:

Do Anova have any plans to release in Europe because I'd like to get one since I don't have space for anything currently available here

They just came out with the 220V international version and they ship everywhere.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Any good vegetarian sous vide applications? I know that meat is kind of the whole point but maybe it could make something veggie easier. I know that a big bag of veggies basically turns into steamed veggies and a bag full of juice that makes good veggie stock.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I pulled up a few vegetarian sous vide recipes and these cauliflower "steaks" look promising.

http://blog.holyscraphotsprings.com...auliflower.html



Here's a fennel recipe that would be appealing if I was into fennel:

http://stefangourmet.com/2013/05/17...s-vide-fondant/

And here's a whole page on root vegetables. Pretty, but boring dishes:

http://sousvideaustralia.com/cookin...oot-vegetables/

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I did rump steaks for an hour at 140F / 60C the other night. They were way more juicy than expected, and more flavorful than I am used to rump steak being.

Salted for an hour before hand, spiced with salt, black and white pepper, and coriander. Don't think I needed salt the second time, and a slice of butter would've been good. Finished for 20 seconds on each side which was also probably too much.

Sous vide does magical things to cheap cuts of meat.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Iron Tusk posted:

Ordered the Anova last night in Red. Apparently they had some in stock slated for sales off Amazon, and I think I got the last one as it went out of stock afterward. Got a shipping notice this morning.

What's the first thing I should make for my wife to justify another kitchen toy taking up space?

The zip lock bag salmon. It's like my favorite thing and just wows people in texture and taste. The brining makes a big difference and I've never done the fancy coating at the end beyond some herbs.



I made the Cauliflower steaks the other day and tried the same recipe with broccoli. They both turned out good. The texture was like steamed veggies but they kept a lot more of the flavor and water. I didn't end up with a bunch of vegetable juice/stock either.

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





BraveUlysses posted:

Nice to hear some more veggie feedback in the thread!

What temp do you use for salmon and which species? Do you torch them or sear?

The one time I tried making salmon it didn't turn out very well.

Like that recipe says I do 45C for anywhere from 25 to 35 minutes depending on the thickness of the fish. I've done this with different kinds of salmon, all good.

There are charts out there that give way higher temperatures for fish. Ignore those! Get it fresh, even your local super market should have daily non-frozen salmon. After cooking at 45C what you're eating is safer than sushi but you still shouldn't feed it to people with compromised immune systems like the boy in the plastic bubble. also practice your best food safety.

Sear for 10-15 seconds on each each. I do it in a pan. Once I used as an herb in this step and it was really tasty.

When buying fresh salmon you want to look for fillets with the fattest stripes of fat. Color isn't a good indicator of quality or taste; color is just what percentage of their diet is krill. Farmed salmon generally has a safer mercury content but isn't great for the environment. If you want to pay out the rear end keep an eye out for sustainable farmed fish.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2014 around 09:13

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





Brined pork loin went in at 60C with the intention of 36 hours.

There isn't so much about this cut and sous vide online. After reading about softer textures at higher temperatures for other cuts of pork like pork belly I changed my mind and at around 12 hours I changed the temperature to 68.3C. I never change temp in the middle of sous vide normally and it kind of ruins the experimental nature of time/temp combos. I'm also not sure I'll be able to wait the full 36 hours and meal timing might end it somewhere around a combined total 27 to 30 hours. That said I'll report back with the results.


Regarding Anova stuff. Mine has a really finicky physical power button. Hard to turn off sometimes. The fan on the noise level is pretty quiet and has been mistaken for a laptop fan before before.

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Mar 22, 2014 around 21:43

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





The pork loin was a big success. The fat gelatinized and the meat was pink and juicy. The meat stayed together very well but was very easily broken up with tongs. One eater who insists on a consistently crispy outside wound up with slightly drier meat. A super hot pan can only do so much but I'm not about to invest in a kitchen torch.

The salty drippings, about a full cup, made for a good broth or sauce with a little white pepper and coriander. Some flour would probably have been nice too. It'll make great stock some something over the next few days. How long is meat stock generally good for?


deimos posted:

My easy chicken plate is doing curry. The proper way to do it is to cook the curry sauce and the chicken separate but my lazy version is to shove everything in a bag (diced chicken brests), let it rest overnight in the fridge then vizzle it while at work at 140F.
I'll probably try this or Phanatic's scrambled eggs next. Got a rough recipe?

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Mar 23, 2014 around 19:00

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





I've read about cooling, chilling or even refrigerating the meat after SV for a good sear and moistness. How doesn't that make the meat cold on the inside though?

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





The Anova app has about 30 reviews and 2.5 stars. Stuff in the iOS app store is usually 4 stars, 3 if it's really bad. But it's new and foodies have umm, high standards so maybe it just needs time. I'm downloading it but I haven't tried it yet. I didn't even know there was a bluetooth-enabled Anova.

I use SousVideDash which I'm pretty sure was a paid app and I've never seen it update. It's really good though.

Indolent Bastard posted:

The annoying part about a crockpot is that I have one but it has digital controls so won't work for a PID system and I don't want a second one eating up space. For the extra $20 I think I'd be happier with the pot mounted type.


I want to try eggs, but the constant mention of "watery" egg whites makes me want to barf. I hope when or if I make eggs they aren't "watery".

I think the real answer is that I should do more recipe research and see if a sous vide cooker will be worthwhile for me.

Thanks for the input everyone.

E: With the Anova Precision Cooker's video it shows zip-lock bags and not vacuum sealed ones, can I skip buying a vacuum sealer or are they more necessary than the video makes out?

Sorry for the poo poo quality but


I've been meaning to try sous vide scrambled eggs but every recipe for it is solid butter or heavy cream. Yeah no poo poo those were some of the best scrambled eggs you've ever had. It was full of butter and then you drizzled more brown butter on it.

Ola posted:

Gonna try two things today, in preparation for dinner tomorrow, sous vide potatoes and caramelized onions.

The potatoes are going in a gratin, so I will just mandolin them, vizzle at 85C and cool. Then tomorrow I can just open the bag and add them to the baking dish, add the rest and throw in oven. Simple enough. But the onions is something new. I came across this recipe:

http://www.orgasmicchef.com/soup/so...melised-onions/

The gist of it is, saute onion, bag it, vizzle for a day at 85C / 186F

Anyone tried it? It's not that hard to caramelize onions in the pan, but there is always the risk of burning etc. Being able to get a large amount of evenly caramelized onions would be great.
How did these both turn out? I've never been happy with doing starchy vegetables in it so I'm really curious about the potatoes. I imagine with some good potatoes it would keep a bit more of the flavor than boiling and make for a better casserole or gratin.
I'm also curious about the onions. Caramelizing them in a pan is so quick and easy I don't get why you would even do that. You said you liked the taste but would you say it was worth it?

Heran Bago fucked around with this message at Feb 7, 2015 around 08:04

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





http://hackaday.com/2015/02/07/brew...us-vide-cooker/



How bad is this for the thing, or how hard is it to clean to use for food again?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Heran Bago
Aug 18, 2006





McSpergin posted:

Do what I do and use the sous vide in a bucket of water as a herms vessel. Copper coil, hose in and out, recirculating the wort through the coil. Great way to get a herms setup for cheap

That sounds really cool. Do you have anymore info on it?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply