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deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Polyscience is coming out with a $300 version (discover). Also I wouldn't put Vollrath up there as a circulator manufacturer unless you want to put every commercial manufacturer, there are a ton doing them now a days.

Also for chamber vacuums, the prices start at $600 (VP112).

You might want to mention the sous vide dash link temperature app on iTunes, it's pretty thorough and has bacteria death curves for core and surface, it will also calculate the temperature over time of a piece of food. It's pretty nice.

deimos fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2013 around 07:59

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deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Shadowhand00 posted:

My biggest question about sous vide is about the pasteurization element - when you sous vide chicken, do you need to extend cooking time by x before it is pasteurized? Or does the sear generally kill most of the bacteria?

Douglas Baldwin's book has a very thorough explanation, but he also presents the chicken tables (the one in the OP are just beef).

He has two tables, on the appendix they are the same as the OP, the pasteurization tables. The amount of time listed is the amount of time your core (that is, the center of a particular cut) should be at that temperature for a 7D reduction. Keep in mind Listeria is the hardier of bacteria.

If you go to a specific food section on Baldwin's book, he'll present the amount of time a specific cut of meat should be on a vizzle machine for it to be safe (Table 5.1 for example for Beef) keep in mind this is for meat starting at 41F / 5C, so if you're starting from frozen you have to add time. (Edit3: Keep in mind that, from his own words: "Note that all the pasteurization times in my guide assume the worst case scenario: the minimum reported thermal diffusivity for that food, a lower surface heat transfer coefficient, and that the shape is an infinite slab. ")


Edit: also I can't find an experiment that ran through a bunch of different bag configurations (vertical/horizontal) for different kinds of machines (circulator, puddles, puddle + water pump, puddle + air bubbler).

Edit2: Found it.

deimos fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2013 around 18:20

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


I also feel this should be somewhere in the OP, it's from egullet, someone testing to see if a suckling pig could be SV'd on a bathtub:

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Custards are great sous vide, but they are faster on a good blender if you're not doing huge amounts.

Steve Yun, you should mention some of the popular mods for the SVS/SVD like an aquarium bubbler to get circulation.

deimos fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2013 around 04:52

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


LTBS posted:

What would happen if I were to set a steak or piece of chicken (lets just say ribeye/chicken breast) in the puddle machine for 10 hours (at their respective temperatures for mid-rare / cooked for the chicken)?

Would it break down and become a mushy mess? Would it be just like I was cooking it for 2 hours?

10 hours is probably fine, but you don't want to try to do rare on a steak for that long, so stick to at least 132F, if not slightly higher.

Also if you're going to be doing a long cook at medium rare temperatures I'd pre-sear or blanch the bag if it's boil-safe (5-10 seconds should be more than enough), it's the easiest way to make sure you have bacteria under control on the surface.

Going much longer than 10-12 hours on a good cut of meat is going to start breaking muscle down and will make it taste very off.

That being said, if you have 10-12 hours, just shove chuck steak (cheap poo poo) on a bag in there and it will taste succulent coming out.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Something to keep in mind when cooking sous vide for storage: As soon as you open the bag pasteurization goes out the window.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


blacquethoven posted:

I didn't see anything on the Sansaire website about the max amount of water you can use, is it right to assume ~5 gallons like the anova?

Yeah around 6G is where you start hitting the limits. The limit really isn't on the pumping (convection will eventually make temperatures be within 1-2 degrees easily) but the heat loss from your container, so in theory an Anova/Sansaire can possibly keep a 10G beer cooler with a foam-filled lid at temperature.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the top part of the circulators needs to breathe relatively cool air so you can't really enclose the whole thing. This is because they have such tight feedback loops that the switching components accumulate a lot of heat (the Anova seems to switch at least at 1Hz).

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


nwin posted:

They still tasted moist, but the texture was off. Some parts (the thinner parts and the outside of the chicken) tasted quite rubbery and off putting.

Chicken meat is a fickle mistress, the rubbery parts got to ~155F. What you can do to counteract is next time SV to 140 for the required time then immediately ice bath them for a minute while in the bag (I use cheap Vodka that I keep for that purpose on the freezer, since it's mostly reusable with some patience and a funnel*). That will make them less susceptible to overcooking when pan searing.



* Bonus points: it's a lot colder than ice.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


YEAH DOG posted:

Pretty much. The lids on the SVS Demi are like thin sheet metal, so it's not really a big deal. I have a piece of heavy felted wool that I keep over the top, but it doesn't really make a difference.

SubG or someone else that might know the physics more might correct me but I think you actually don't want to insulate the SV(S|D) lids so that the convection effect works better, it is my understanding that the higher temperature differential the more movement on the currents.

At least that would be my guess without experimental data. Of course this all goes out the window if you're using a bubbler for water movement.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


The book that got me started on SV was Joan Roca's. It's wonderful, I got it while visiting family in Spain because it looked neat and the english copy was stupid cheap. I feel it's equally relevant to home cooks and restaurants, but it's definitely restaurant oriented, it even has a fairly thorough HACCP chapter. If you can find a cheap copy it's well worth a read.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Lolcano Eruption posted:

Thank you guys, I will check those out.

I'm looking at the ziplock/submerging method of "vacuum" sealing and am I correct in thinking that it would take more oil in the bag than using a traditional vacuum sealer? like for example, if I wanted to cook a steak, I would have to dump some olive oil in the sack? Whereas with a traditional, I could use solid butter or forego it entirely?

This alone would make me want to spring for the sealer.

No need to dump olive oil in the sack, if you have a lot of air on a ziplock bag just adjust the time up a little bit, it's probably not even that big a deal as long as you can keep the bag submerged on your puddle as the air will tend to go to the tippy-top of the bag.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Goon posted:

Set it to 135* F, and cook multiple items at that temp that require different times.

The Anova is also decent enough that there won't be a huge temp dip if you add an item halfway through a lonk cook, max deviation I saw was a degree or so when I dropped some room temp chicken into my 72 hour short ribs.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


MrEnigma posted:

Are you sure it's gas? As things get soft in the bath they tend to move around and the air that was already in there shows up. Usually not a huge deal, I just readjust to make sure the bag top is up, this usually leaves everything else in the bag still submerged.

I'd go with probably not gas also, wait the 48 hours, if the bag is not ballooned then it's probably not gas.

Pre-searing (or even blanching the bag after sealing) and doing very clean prep is helpful for really long cooks.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


I have found that if I cool down ribs after cooking them it gives a much better texture than eating them warm, I haven't researched this effect much but I think it has to do with gelatin needing to cool a bit.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


BrosephofArimathea posted:

Either way, make the carrot cake. at least once. It's delicious, and impressive as hell.

did this but as a layer cake (with the buttons and walnuts on top) and it was loving delicious. Took it in to work (so I wouldn't be tempted to eat the whole thing) and it disappeared so quick.

I'll have to do the ice cream and gele next time too (I was out of Agar and my ice cream machines bowl wasn't in the freezer for some reason.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Ultimate Mango posted:

Wait a second, do you have a searchable digital copy of this book? How did that happen?

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


.Z. posted:

Food safety question.

I cooked some steaks at 140 for 8 hours, and then promptly ice bathed them.

Unfortunately I forgot to put them away in the fridge after patting them dry. So they've been sitting out the entire night, but still sealed in their vac bags.

Are they safe? Or should I just pitch them?

Not safe but possibly re-pasteurizable, I'd wait for SubG or someone more familiar with the science to elaborate, but may be able to simply drop them into a bath until 7D bacterial death again (2-3 hours at 135F, to overcook it less than 140F did, depending on the cut thickness).

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Doom Rooster posted:

Cross-posting from the dinner thread.


Short ribs, cooked in the puddle machine at 145 for 24 hours, seared and glazed with a coffee balsamic reduction. Balsamic sprouts, and lemon, thyme, white whine smashed peewee potatoes.

Definitely the best batch so far. I actually like 24 hours better than 72. The meat is still plenty tender, but not at all mushy. It's like a perfectly cooked ribeye.



For 24/48/72 hour cooking you have to limit your temp, there's a chart on modernist cuisine of the times/temps they recommend for each. I know that for me 72h at a lower temperature (135 IIRC) gave perfect results, but I used a braising liquid.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


BraveUlysses posted:

I cooked up an extra boneless, skinless chicken breast last night, 2.5h @ 143* F.

Plunged it into a bowl of water with two large blue ice bricks...and then promptly fell asleep for 7 hours before I awoke and found it in the kitchen.

The water was still extremely cold and the meat should have been pasteurized but I need a second opinion if I should keep it or not.

If extremely cold is under 40F then it's safe.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


lightpole posted:

Sous Vide, more like forget about your food when it's done.

This has yet to happen to me, but then again I put my ice bath in my fridge specifically so it doesn't happen to me!

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


The turchetta linked is breast so I have no idea why you even ask!

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Walked posted:

Ended up using an immersion blender on the custard as soon as its out of the water bath, and right before the foil tins. THAT worked perfectly; silky smooth texture I wanted/needed.

Just figured I'd share in case anyone wants to give it a go at some point.

Lowering the bath temperature a bit works too, also when you take it out of the bath after it cooks, put it on ice and constantly massage the bag so it's in constant movement. Made delicious creme brulee that way without clogging my chinois.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Dave Arnold?

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


I have been on a yogurt kick lately, ends up very good and it's a lot less fussy than doing it via pot. Anyone else tried it? So far I've made roughly a gallon, tomorrow or so I'll make another gallon and a bit because I want to experiment with 1% milk and timing it.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Remind me again, in that case is quenching bad for the steel?

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


a foolish pianist posted:

The intro to Conan the Barbarian lied to us!

It didn't, quench hardening is a thing.

I just wasn't sure of the metallurgy for quenching re-heated annealed metals.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Is that his pre-release Sansaire he's subtly trolling us with?

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


mcbrite posted:

I was actually thinking of a propane-torch... Maybe I'm a complete idiot, but I seem to remember seeing that on some videos...
Already have the torch for lighting my Shisha-coals, that's what got me thinking...
Is one of those kitchen-torches even propane? Guess it must be something that doesn't leave a gasoline taste on the food...

No torch that is properly burning (all blue flame) will leave gas flavors on food, the problem is, apparently, that when you get hot enough (my guess is ~1KF) you start getting bad-tasting compounds that overpower the flavors created by maillard reaction. SubG could educate us on this, but it's what I gathered from the info Dave Arnold posted about the Searzall research.

deimos fucked around with this message at Dec 19, 2013 around 00:14

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


AquaChef only works with 1 gallon, which is fine if it's the only size you'll work with. Anova works with 1 gallon too! But also with 2, and 3 and 4, etc.

That alone would make me return and get an Anova.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


If you have a range that will get your pan super duper hot (600+ F) you don't use oil, otherwise oil.

At least that's my opinion from now owning a good range.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


A hole saw + hack or reciprocating saw works pretty well too.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Unless your meat is of extremely good quality and you know your butcher has a good cold chain I'd blanch any long cooks that are not going to be at higher SV temps (anything under 135ish).

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Make sure the electrics on the outlet are good, I discovered one of my outlets had bad ground when the anova didn't work on it.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


This is a great guide for SV yoghurt.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


It seems everyone and their mother jumped on the ANOVA bandwagon when they dropped the price (at least I've seen it recommended by us, egullet and reddit). Good for them.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


dotster posted:

I have seen warnings not to do butter or any dairy products for long cooks so you don't poison yourself.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


SubG I summon thee.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Anyone done pork loin SV? I was wondering on temp/time.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


SlayVus posted:

EA free is different from BPA. EA releases estrogen.

And most silicone leaches endocrine disruptors. v0v

e: And while we're at it so does everything else in your loving house.

deimos fucked around with this message at Feb 21, 2014 around 15:16

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deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Also after a cursory glance of the paper cited, they seem to stress the poo poo out of the resins, it seems more targeted to "whole chain" issues rather than bagging my veggies.

If anything silicone might be more harmful because you're reusing and I don't think there's been any studies of leaching-over-time.

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