Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«3 »
  • Post
  • Reply
EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Reiterpallasch posted:

My Dorkfood came in earlier this week, and I ended up attempting steak--a NY strip, at 130 degrees for a hour. It came out good, but I had trouble putting a good sear on it with only a minute on each side in my cast iron skillet. I ended up giving it a little more time to develop a crust, and that ended up bringing more gray into the steaks than I really care for. Does anyone have any tips for developing a crust, fast?

Dry it more, make sure the pan has a thin layer of neutral oil in it and is pretty hot.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



DeeMurf posted:

Another question: Does it matter if the meat/fish is frozen when I vacuum-seal it up with butter, spice and goodies? I'm thinking it shouldn't as long as the cook time is long enough, right?

Your food has to get up to temp within 4 hours. You can't cook large things from frozen as safely.

.Z. posted:

Food safety question.

I cooked some steaks at 140 for 8 hours, and then promptly ice bathed them.

Unfortunately I forgot to put them away in the fridge after patting them dry. So they've been sitting out the entire night, but still sealed in their vac bags.

Are they safe? Or should I just pitch them?

140's kind of a weird temp. I'd just pitch those.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



NoDamage posted:

Got my Anova on Friday. For $200 I'm impressed, it feels very well made.

Cooked up a ribeye at 127 F and seared in a cast iron skillet to finish. I was following the Serious Eats recipe so I seared for 30 seconds on one side, 1 minute on the other, then flipped back for 30 more seconds. Got a good crust but I think I seared for too long, one side ended up a bit greyer than I would have liked. One other adjustment I'll make the next time around is re-salt/peppering the steak after removing it from the water bath but before searing it. I think it will help produce a better crust with a stronger flavor.

Overall the taste was quite similar to my normal method of searing in the cast iron skillet and finishing in the oven.

Next up: pork belly and salmon. Anyone have a good pork belly recipe besides this one?

If you put pepper on your steak before you sear it at crazy hot heat, it's just going to burn the pepper.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



PurpleLizardWizard posted:

Thanks for the tip. I wasn't aware of those.

From what I can tell, though, neither of these would speed up the aging process, though, would they? The whole mellowing and melding of flavors?

Do this: http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/0...heap-technique/

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Safety Dance posted:

Question:
I made some short ribs this weekend. Browned 'em, salted and peppered 'em, and popped them into plastic baggies with a sprig of thyme for 72 hours at 57.2 C. I then put them in the fridge overnight (we were going out to eat with a guest that I didn't realize would be staying the whole weekend) and reheated them this evening. They smelled very strong. "Marrowy" is the world my girlfriend used. The meat had a great texture and tasted wonderful, but the strong smell was off-putting. I did leave the bone attached. Should I have removed that? Anything I should have done different?

Did you chill it in an ice bath properly after cooking it before putting it in the fridge?

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



nwin posted:

So I roasted a chicken tonight and was thinking...what about sous vide whole chicken? Legs and breasts cooked the same temp. Only problem is it would have the texture of crock pot chicken and no crispy skin. To correct that, either a torch or dry it off and throw it under the broiler for a bit maybe?

Am I completely insane here?

You have to break it down, you need good thermal contact. Technically I guess you could just fill the bag with enough fat to heat everything, but you can't just vac seal a whole chicken and dump it in there with empty space.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



BraveUlysses posted:

I cooked up an extra boneless, skinless chicken breast last night, 2.5h @ 143* F.

Plunged it into a bowl of water with two large blue ice bricks...and then promptly fell asleep for 7 hours before I awoke and found it in the kitchen.

The water was still extremely cold and the meat should have been pasteurized but I need a second opinion if I should keep it or not.

Hit the water with a thermometer.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Evi|Sycho posted:

I recently impulse-purchased a Sous Vide Supreme Demi without doing my research and now am wondering if I should have gone with the Anova. I'm in a small apartment kitchen and between the footprint, cost and lack of circulation I'm wondering if I wouldn't be better off with the Anova. Cost isn't a huge factor but I'm having trouble seeing what benefits there are to the SVS for the extra cost?

I have had a SVS (the big model) since it came out, and if I could trade it for an Anova I would do it in a second.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



a foolish pianist posted:

It looks like the single, molded plastic housing is pretty key to the patent, so maybe not? It is pretty ridiculous that 'put well known technology inside a plastic shell' is patentable.

That's not how patents work.

What is claimed to be infringed is the following combination, in light of the specification and a lot of other stuff. There is no mention of which claim is infringed, so let's just go with the broadest one.

quote:

1. A constant temperature circulator for maintaining a liquid at a constant temperature including

a controller,
a display connected to the controller
and an electric motor connected to the controller

including an output shaft having an impeller,

the constant temperature circulator comprising:
a housing including a first integrally molded cover connected to a second integrally molded cover,
an upper portion defined in the housing that contains the controller, display and electric motor and
a lower portion defined in the housing adapted to be immersed into the liquid;
one of the first and second integrally molded covers including a first inlet,
a first casing extending from the first inlet to a first rim and
a first channel disposed within the lower portion;
an other of the first and second integrally molded covers including a second casing having a second rim disposed within the lower portion;
a chamber cooperatively defined by the first casing and the second casing and configured to complementarily encapsulate the impeller when the first rim abuts the second rim;
an outlet cooperatively defined by the first rim and the second rim in communication with the chamber; and
a first adjuster movably connected to the first channel to adjust a flow of the liquid through the chamber, the movement of the first adjuster between a substantially closed position and a substantially open position.

If this goes to a jury trial, there is almost literally no way to guess what will happen. It's possible to submit prior art and to request that the patent be re-examined in the meantime, too, which takes a long time.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2013 around 05:09

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



To anyone who picked up an Anova outside of the US, how long did it take for it to ship? I got one for my brother for Christmas and he won't have it by then, but it would be nice to have a general idea of when he'll get it.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Try 130ish for 4 hours, with a cut like ribeye you need to give it time to deal with the connective tissue if you're going to do it closer to 130.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



No Wave posted:

134 is perfect for me... Ribeye is way better a little warmer because the fat gets gooey.

130 is high enough to goo-ify the fat, it just takes way longer at that temp than a few degrees higher.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



DeeMurf posted:

Bought a Polyscience puddlewarmer for my dad for christmas - Great success! Now I can't wait for the guy to figure out how to use it properly. And, with that in mind...

Could we please add a list of informative links to recipes, tips and other interwebz recources for sous vide cooking to the OP?

Look up a practical guide to sous vide cooking by baldwin

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



VERTiG0 posted:

When you guys are doing steaks in the puddle then searing them afterward, if you're aiming for an internal target temp of 135, wouldn't it be wise to sous-vide them to 130 and then sear? Surely the internal temp would raise at least a few degrees with the quick finishing sear, no?

If you dry the steak very well and sear it in an extremely hot pan with lots of oil, then only the area immediately next to the outside of the steak will have time to overcook.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



dotster posted:

Why so hot, I have a brisket that I was going to do this weekend and have shredded beef and some sliced and was only planning on doing 145-150F/48hrs. At those temps the meat still looks "done", no red, and is nice and juicy. I have seen recipes at 170F+ and am just trying to figure out what that gets me other than maybe dryer meat?

It gets you meat that has been braised/confited using a very small amount of fat (duck fat is super expensive) or braising liquid. You can't replicate that texture at 145-150F.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Phanatic posted:

I just pulled the trigger on the Anova unit.

One thing I've read is that while slow immersion in a ziploc bag is a reasonable facsimile of vacuum-sealing for short cooks like steaks and such, if I want to do 72-hour short ribs or anything like that I should really get a real vacuum unit.

What's the dividing line between "Ziploc's good enough" and "No, you need a real seal"? 8 hours? Less?

The only thing I've ever had a bag break (twice) is when I tried to make trotter gear sous-vide.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



granpa yum posted:

Why don't buy a sous vide supreme? I get that there are better and cheaper alternatives now but I have one from before that was the case and am generally happy with it
I have one of the original set that came out, and there's absolutely no reason to buy one when you can get an Anova for $200.

.Z. posted:

How long did that take to start happening? I've had mine for half a year and have yet to see that occur yet.
I bought mine about 4-5 years ago and that set doesn't corrode, I think it's a known issue with some of the Demis.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Womens Jeans posted:

I just sous vided a steak for 72 hours at 52.5C/126.5F, except it didn't seem to work out very well. Instead of tasting like a delicious soft juicy steak (like it did when I cooked it for 6 hours at 52.5C) it tasted a lot more like my steak that I did for 24 hours at 62C/143F. That is, much more like a potroast.

Any idea as to what happened? Where did I go wrong in creating this supposed juicy tender dripping-with-juiciness/blood 72 hour steak? I didn't do anything to the steak (i.e. salt, brine, sear) before sous-viding. I just threw it straight into the water bath and left it for 3 days...

What cut of meat did you use?

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Heran Bago posted:

Any good vegetarian sous vide applications? I know that meat is kind of the whole point but maybe it could make something veggie easier. I know that a big bag of veggies basically turns into steamed veggies and a bag full of juice that makes good veggie stock.

All root vegetables are good, basically all green things are terrible if you're not making a sauce-type thing.

You can make really good roasted-style potatoes by taking some fingerlings, cooking them s-v in butter or duck fat or any fat at ~ 183F then drying and pan-searing then tossing with the bag liquid.

This potato puree is super good:

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Tacier posted:

The Sous Vide Supreme is on sale for $200. I hadn't previously considered one and was planning on picking up an immersion circulator soon. Is there any compelling reason to buy the Supreme over something like the Anova now that they're the same price?

I have a sous vide supreme, and it has served me very well over the years, but get the Anova instead.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



No Wave posted:

Anyone have any favorite offal they like sous-vide? I'm on a kick. Have had some 145 degree calf liver (good), 140 for 11 hours lamb kidney (better!). Sweetbreads are the next obvious choice, I guess... any others?

Make trotter gear sous-vide.

Heart is also very, very good sous-vide.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



No Wave posted:

eFor trotter gear if I do it I'll probably just use this recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...xcerpt_readmore

Although, looking at it, seems like there isn't much reason not to just pressure-cook instead, as a.) you'll keep the benefits of not emitting any steam during cooking and b.) you're heating the trotter past 160, making any benefits of a lower temp irrelevant.

Do it at 135 or so instead and then deep fry it to puff the skin and slice the gelatinous trotter.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Hed posted:

I just dry them and sear in a hot pan with melted butter. I usually cook 6-8 on Sundays to make for our lunches during the week.

Use oil instead of butter, it will give it a much better sear. If you want to add butter, finish with it instead.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



No Wave posted:

There's no reason to do this. The smoke point of the olive oil doesn't change.

Yeah, that's an urban legend, I've heard it lots of times before.

It will smoke less than pure low-smoke-point oil will, but it'll still burn.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Ultimate Mango posted:

This leads us to the next logical question:
Can you use the puddle machine to clarify butter?

Google just seems to have lots of information on how to infuse into butter this way, but not actually clarifying.

sure, but why bother? just spend 60 seconds with a double boiler.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Hed posted:

Ok, I used to use grapeseed oil so I could just do stupid high heat but I find that I don't get that ~nice brown sear~ as much. Even if it's due to dirty burnt milk solids I think it made a more appealing-looking product. Any ideas for how to get this with oil?


I cook at 140 for 4 hours. Same for 15-30 secs a side I guess. I haven't tried an ice bath prior.

Just do it at medium-high heat, no need for stupid high heat.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Ultimate Mango posted:

So go from puddle to ice bath in the bag, chill for a bit and then sear in rocket hot pan for as short as possible to get crust?

Medium-high heat is better than too-hot. I don't bother chilling, just dry well and don't use a meat that is too thin.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



ShadowCatboy posted:

Okay rather silly question: Anyone know if I can sous vide a steak and take it on a transatlantic flight?

Only if they are containers of 100ml or less

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



That temp is honestly kind of low just in terms of deliciousness (your article explicitly mentions it too), but ignoring that:

120F is basically just on the line where bacteria stops thriving. You did not cook it at that temperature long enough to pasteurize it. The entire time it was under 120F, bacteria was breeding. Then you (presumably) cooled the steak in a manner that did not bring it outside of the cold side of the ~danger zone~ quickly.

So you have a steak that you heated up to grow bacteria, did not pasteurize, then cooled down in a manner that encouraged bacterial growth, then want to do it again.

Heating a raw steak to 120F and then eating it is way less likely to make you sick than four cycles (2x heat then chill) of being in the food safety bad zone.

That said, you would probably not have gotten sick if you had done it, it's just really bad to sous-vide things with bad technique if you don't understand the food safety implications. You should look at Baldwin's Practical Guide to Sous-Vide Cooking (free online) if you want more information about how to be safe.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



a foolish pianist posted:

This week, I'm trying out a 48 hour/135 degree tritip roast. 8 hours makes for a nice medium rare, but I'm hoping this longer time will make it really tender.

That's kind of a waste, tritip is already lean and will not benefit from being cooked for that long.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Ultimate Mango posted:

Steaks were great. Perfectly cooked edge to edge, great crust with the torch, but set off the smoke detectors three times while torching.
Just dry them then sear them in a medium-hot pan with a neutral oil.

quote:

The potatoes were a challenge... I couldn't get them through the food mill (ricer) and ended up with maybe a quarter raced and a quarter mashed and an interesting texture. I should have just used the food processor to make the purée. Or a larger die on the food mill. Tasted good though.

Don't use a food processor to mash potatoes, you'll develop the gluten in them so much that it'll be like eating glue.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Random Hero posted:

What torch did you use?



seriously torches are ridiculous compared to just using a pan with oil

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Someone go find an article about this on Natural News so we can have a definitive answer.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Falcon2001 posted:

Just got my sansaire, first time messing around with sous vide and my fiancee is all freaked out about it. She's a protein specialist and grows bacteria for a living, so I guess I'm just going to dig into the science of it and just prove it's safe that way.

Here you go for an intro to the safety part of it

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



55C/120F is the hottest that residential tap water is permitted to be here, legally.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



Chemmy posted:

55C is 131F.

Sorry, I meant 49C.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



deimos posted:

Pretty sure SubG is saying you two are not doing it right, if the ribeye is normal american thickness (euros tend to do thinner steaks) of 1-1.5" you are not pasteurising your food and might as well not loving cook it.

What.

You don't need to pasteurize it if you're only cooking it like that for a couple hours.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



SlayVus posted:

Bacteria don't just live on the outside, they live on the inside of the meat. When spoiling bacteria become active, it doesn't matter whether you're meat is cooked or no it has already started to spoil.

This is not appreciably true in beef.

quote:

You're not just cooking the outside of the meat when you stick in the water bath for 5-6 hours. You're pasteurizing the WHOLE product.

We're not talking about a 5-6h cook, we're talking about a short-term one where pasteurization is not necessary.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



This is a legit concern. If previous slow cooker threads and general goon hygiene are any indication, someone in one of these threads is going to do something really stupid and get super sick since food safety is way more of a concern when you're cooking something for 24+ hours at a time at temperatures that approach the optimal bacterial growth range.

(not to mention that if you're feeding a child or someone that is immunocompromised you should really make sure you're not going to gently caress it up.)

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



a foolish pianist posted:

Does anyone go for long cooking times below 130? I gave it try once, but tossed the result, and I've never really seen anyone encourage that sort of thing here. Definitely never seen anyone do anything around 110.

we get people asking if it's okay to throw a whole frozen chicken into a slow cooker in the other thread. it's worth making sure that it's clear what is okay and not okay to do.

hell there was that guy that wanted to keep a burger in a ziploc bag in his puddle at all times, just in case he wanted a burger with 5 minutes notice. gross goonness/laziness knows no bounds.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«3 »