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Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Doc Walrus posted:

Cooking a pre-cooked half ham in the ol' Joule tomorrow, then following up with Deviled Eggs. I've got the eggs exactly how I want them, but I haven't done ham any any fashion before. What can go wrong with SV hams?

I've had a lot of success with ham. Basically, I just SV it for a lot longer than you'd think (like, 6 hours iirc?) and then I do a few glaze cycles in a really hot oven. Best ham I've ever had, and if you glaze on a pan where you can catch the drippings, the mix of ham juice + extra glaze is *amazing* as a garnish/dipping sauce.

I assume the ham came already vacuum-sealed? My only concern about this is that I can never be confident that the seal on the bag wasn't damaged during handling at some point when living in the fridge at the grocer, on the way home, in my own fridge, etc.

I've actually been considering looking into a larger vacuum sealer for this purpose. My wife did a cursory check and I guess anything over 11" is turbo-expensive though. I'm going to do some more digging right now, but if anyone has any ideas, I'd be glad to hear them!

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Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Steve Yun posted:

You need something that fits 11 inches but expands up to 14 inches



Oh, thanks for the tip! I saw those on their website after I posted that, but I still wasn't sure if they would produce good results with my little Seal-a-Meal. You've had good luck with them, I take it?

. . . then, somehow, I fell into a rabbit hole of watching chamber sealers on YouTube, and I decided that if I was ever gonna drop $serious on a vacuum sealer, it'd have to be a chamber one, size be damned.

So, I think I'll give a roll of those expanding bags a go and see what happens. I'm not sure they're cheap enough to just over-seal *everything* I buy that is bigger than 11", but probably worth it for expensive cuts of meat.

Speaking of, I broke a 12lb Prime Rib down into 3 pieces for the 11" bags, so I'm gonna SV a chunk of that tonight for Thanksgiving and see how that goes. I saw that Kenji recommended the open-air method for Prime Rib, but I've been doing that once or twice a year for the last 7 years or so; I'm feeling adventurous. Anyone have any luck and/or tips for Prime Rib?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Steve Yun posted:

Depends if any seal a meal has any logic that tells it to give up if it doesn't achieve an ideal vacuum in a certain amount of time, because the bags are big and will have way more air.

You can test this by sucking on a bag that's open on both sides and seeing if the seal a meal gives up or not

I think I've done this before on accident (while trying to make a bag and skipping the seal-only step, whoops) and it just kept going ... which is how I figured out that something wasn't quite right, after I sat there holding the top down for an awkward length of time.

I suppose that no matter what, it's WAY less than the price of a large sealer, so it's not that pricey of an experiment.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


I've been at this for a couple years now, and have modified coolers for the task (one small one for day-to-day stuff, and a MASSIVE one for big cuts and/or entertaining).

What I haven't figured out yet are:
• Some sort of rack to hold the item just an inch or so above the bottom (so water can get underneath)
• Some sort of weight

I've tried several methods to hold the food off the bottom in the past, but it seems that anything made of metal has steel in it SOMEWHERE that will start rusting after a bit, getting all gnarly in the process. I haven't found anything made of plastic that seems to do what I want (yet). I've considered just cutting up a milk crate or something, but haven't pulled the trigger yet.

For weight, I've pretty much decided that it wouldn't be too hard to just vacuum-seal some smooth river rocks or something, but I don't know how I would go about attempting to clip it to a food bag, then, since any clip I can think of has a steel spring in it somewhere.

What have you guys used to solve these problems?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


toplitzin posted:

If you're deep into modding, epoxy or attach a strip of magnetic stainless to the sides and then use a small magnet to hold the bag at the desired height.

I think over time, even stainless will rust, especially if it is submerged for most of its life. It'd be up against the wall too then, hmm.



Carillon posted:

Couldn't you just seal the rocks or whatever in a small bag and just throw them in with the food? No clipping required.

Hmm, I hadn't considered this one. But yeah, it probably wouldn't be real hard to create a small pouch of rocks. I'd have to wash it, but it's an idea! I hadn't considered putting a weight in WITH the food; I'd always been thinking of it as a separate add-on. Interesting . . .



eddiewalker posted:

What’s the problem with a steel spring in your clip? I binder-clip forks and spoons to sink bags all the time.

What kind of binder clip?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Elizabethan Error posted:

https://anovaculinary.com/anova-hacks-floating-bags/
anything weighty should work(anova suggests pie weights amongst others) but should be sealed into a bag by themselves

Thanks, I'll give this a read!



Inspector 34 posted:

I like putting a decently strong magnet in a ziplock back sealed in with whatever I'm cooking, then another magnet underneath the vessel. Probably wouldn't work with a cooler rig but does great with my cambro.


I like this idea; when I figure out what kind of rack I want at the bottom of the cooler, I could just glue a magnet or I guess vacuum-seal some iron/steel/stainless and glue/permanently affix that to the rack to keep it down.


Thanks everyone!

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Hopper posted:

Why not just use some sort of cookie cooling rack inside your container to keep things from the bottom? Those don't rust as long as they are fully underwater, and you can just pat them dry or blow them dry with a hair dryer afterwards.

I want to say that's where I started, but they did end up rusting after awhile. That's when I came to realize that the stainless plating on most items isn't 100% perfect. I mean, I never took them out of the water either because I just wanted to leave it in there forever, which may have been part of the problem I suppose.

Edit: Maybe it didn't rust as badly as I recall; I'll have to consider giving it another try, perhaps.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


SubG posted:

I just use a stainless steel rack or a plate. But if you're really stressing out about it you know there are things that are literally designed specifically as s-v bag weights, right? Silicone-covered stainless, most of them.

Edit: some random product photos scraped from the first page of results from amazon. They all seem to run somewhere between US$10 and US$20 for a set of them:





Oh, hey, thanks! This is sort of what I started out thinking about looking for, so that helps! I guess I just didn't realize such a thing was being mass-marketed yet.


Phanatic posted:

Lol if you don’t have your manservant Enrique climb K2 to carve your stone sv weights directly out of a Himalayan mountain.

Enrique knows all about "variety of mineral element", bless him

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


The Slack Lagoon posted:

Well, did 145 for 1h~50m. Tested the thickest part with a thermometer and it read the right temp for what I had it set to so hopefully it was at temp for long enough. Tasted good, was moist, but definitely had a bit of "is this cooked I've never had chicken this texture before"

Is that a common reaction or did I mess up and undercook it?

Yeah, when I had my dad try SV chicken breast the first time, he spit it out because he thought it was still raw (due to the texture).

What you had was fully-cooked, 100% safe to eat, etc; it's just that typically by the time you hit that point in the center in a pan, the rest of it is much more done.

I think if you went for that time at 160, it'd have a much more conventional mouthfeel (while still being more tender and moist than you're probably used to)

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


sterster posted:

Because insta pots and air fryers are all the rage now.

Yeah, I have way too many kitchen gadgets at this point. Though I justify it to myself by viewing them as tools - they all excel at different things, so I use a lot of them in tandem.

I think the only thing I'm missing at this point is a smoker . . . .

Edit for sous vide content: anyone have a favorite brisket recipe? (specifically, the flat). We did 50 hours at 135, and it was tender as hell . . . almost too tender. She seared it in the cast iron, and it was okay, but I think I'd have had better luck just spooling up the fire pit and searing it over a really hot wood fire.

She considered the brisket a failure (largely because of the texture, I think?), but with a bit of salt and a touch of BBQ sauce, it was more moist and flavorful than anything I've had at even the expensive BBQ joints in town. I thought it was great, even though I acknowledge that it could probably still be improved.

Zarin fucked around with this message at 16:17 on May 14, 2020

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


I think I've seen stainless steel racks designed to stay in the water that have latches to keep the bag underwater, but you'd need some sort of waterproof gloves or something probably.

I usually just do some variety of weight when required. The silicone bags seem like they can be slightly more difficult to sink than plastic, but I like the idea of reusing.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Hasselblad posted:

My sealer is leaving a lot to be desired these days as far as evacuating air as well as sealing properly. Whats a solid no frills unit that wont hurt the wallet too much?

Not sure your price range; I started my journey with a $20 Seal-a-Meal unit that was . . . functional. Mostly. It was tough to use, because it didn't have a manual switch to go from pulling vacuum to activating the sealer; it just had to hit its own internal cutoff. I suspect the pressure sensor is what died on it, since it would still pull decent vacuum but would never stop.

When it died, I took the opportunity to get this model:
https://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-Non-Roll-Vacuum-Sealing-FM2000-015/dp/B01BK8UDCA

I feel like the ability to kill the suck and begin sealing immediately is a nice one. If the food is a bit too juicy, I'll just hit the switch and get the seal completed before the juice sneaks up into the unit. I figure that a 99% vacuum is good enough for my use case, and it keeps me from having to go through a cycle or three of wiping out the inside of the bag trying to achieve a seal.

I want to say I got this for $75 at Wal-Mart a year or so ago, but I'm not 100% at this point.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Hasselblad posted:

Mine is a foodsaver and I can only get to the bottom gasket. Also is it me or have foodsaver bags begun to use a lot thinner plastic? Noticed a lot of my frozen stuff developing rips (not from bones jabbing through) from shuffling things around in the chest freezer.

I don't use any particular branded bag, but instead go on Amazon or whatever and find 50' rolls of whatever thickness plastic I ordered last time in 11" wide (I want to say 3mil but don't quote me on that)

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Hasselblad posted:

What search terms? Are you talking about rolls that are already side-welded, or simply plastic single ply sheets?

This is what I got last time:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07DKRZ53Y/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can't remember where I found the thickness at, but this I guess gives an idea of what I'm talking about.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


ColHannibal posted:

I don’t understand the need for fancy doohickeys to keep things submerged.

I put plates and mugs in the dishwasher, why not put them in my water bath? Big tri-tip? Put a dinner plate on it.

I have a really big cooler for large cooks/groups of people, and if a large enough item wants to float, it'll just upend the plate and slide off to the side.

I guess because of the lack of success in the large bath, I never tried using it in the smaller one. Hmm.

Non-sequitur, but is there anywhere to get good, cheap plates? I like the Corelle style ones, but they're like $5 each and I never see anything like that at Goodwill.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Anne Whateley posted:

I love Corelle. It's probably hit-or-miss at Goodwill, like none for six months and then a grandma's whole collection. It's cheaper as box sets or if there's a factory outlet anywhere near you, but tbh $5 is a good price for something that will look the same after 15 years as it did on day one. I would either pick a super common pattern or decide to mix and match say, all red patterns, so you can get whatever red pattern's cheapest and it looks deliberate.

I'm definitely not at a point in my life where I'm ready to care about matching dishware yet, I'm afraid. Mostly making do with hand-me-down everything, haha. At this rate, I'll be ready for matching dishware in a decade, maybe.


toplitzin posted:

Corelle had a nice sale recently and i got a bunch of stuff for reasonably cheap.

Directly from their website, or a distributor?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU



I can't seem to find any information about what material they are made out of, but . . . there sure are a lot of listings for those on Ebay

I wouldn't THINK sitting around in a box would have altered them much, if any; imo (and I'm not a doctor) the only real risk would be if standards have changed on what is acceptable for food packaging and such in the intervening years.

Comedy: Maybe the OSHA thread would have some idea haha

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


I owe my dad a LOT for some work he did on my house recently, so the plan for Friday is to have what might possibly be one of the most "effort" meals I've ever made:

3x MASSIVE ribeye steaks; thinking 4 hours from frozen @ 135
2x NY Strip; thinking 2.5 hours from fresh @135
2x Filet/Tenderloin; thinking 2 hours from fresh @ 135

After the bath, I'll be drying them, lightly brushing them with butter and some spices (garlic/onion/pepper/salt), and letting 'em rest for a few.

I'll light my firepit, get it roaring hot, and use that to sear the outside of them. Once they come inside, they will be immediately plated and we'll begin.

--------------------------------------

While all that is going on, we're looking at trying to make just about the creamiest mashed potatoes possible. Peel some russets, cook them in the instant pot, transfer them to a hot mixing bowl, add some sour cream and all the meat juices from the SV bags. Also going to sautee some garlic, mash it with a mortar and pestle, and add that too.

We'll garnish with chives and bacon at the table.

--------------------------------------

While the potatoes are mixing, we'll sautee up some mushrooms and onions as a garnish for the steaks.

--------------------------------------

Probably take the lazy way out with broccoli and steam it, though maybe we'll try and roast it. Never roasted broccoli before.

--------------------------------------

Oven will be set to warm to keep plates hot, and anything that's ready before the steaks.




I'm super pumped. I've had a lot of experience with ribeye, but I've never done NY Strip or Filet before. I feel like 135 is the sweet spot for ribeye because of what it does to the fat, and the NY Strip/Filet are mostly made with my mom in mind, since she likes things "medium well". We do not DO things "medium well" at my house, but she has made peace with this because my "medium" doesn't "drip blood" all over her plate.

If anyone has any comments or suggestions, though, I'll be glad to hear 'em!

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Erwin posted:

I'd recommend seasoning the steaks before the bath, especially if you're just searing directly over the fire. Salt and pepper only, plus optional butter, fresh garlic (not garlic powder), and a sprig of rosemary inside the bag with each one. It's amazing how much of the rosemary flavor is imparted.

That should be pretty easy to do for the fresh steaks; the frozen ones are already vacuum sealed. Although now that I say that, there's probably enough of a tail that I could cut the bag open, sprinkle some seasoning in, and re-seal.

Whenever I've done that in the past, it seems like the salt has done something weird to the texture of the meat. But I keep seeing everyone suggest the same everywhere, so maybe it's time to try again.

I'll have to see if we keep rosemary on hand.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Trip report: success!

Owing to a last-minute decision, we decided to just put all the steaks in for 4 hours. We may have overshot that by 20 minutes, I'm not entirely sure (punctuality isn't a specialty of my parents )

Searing over the fire went well. I was concerned that they were on for "too long", but when we cut into them it was practically picture-perfect: deep red throughout that immediately transitioned to a dark crust with no gray in-between.

Unfortunately, I felt that the texture was a bit "off" - like it was almost too fine a grain. My wife and parents strongly disagreed, but I'm almost 100% positive that I've made a better steak before. Not to sell last night's effort short - it was still in the realm of "lol why do steakhouses even exist anymore, just lol" Someday I'll be rich and/or dumb enough to get a dedicated dry-aging fridge Still, I have a couple left-over strips and tenderloins, so I may see what 3 hours is like.


Erwin posted:

I'd recommend seasoning the steaks before the bath, especially if you're just searing directly over the fire. Salt and pepper only, plus optional butter, fresh garlic (not garlic powder), and a sprig of rosemary inside the bag with each one. It's amazing how much of the rosemary flavor is imparted.

I did salt and pepper inside the bags! I'm not sure if it did a whole lot, though.


Trastion posted:

If you don't, you should start growing some. It's great, especially in potatoes. And it keeps coming back every year. Plant it in a corner of the yard or a little pot somewhere and always have fresh on hand!

Hmm, I just cut down the massive Ash tree in our back yard that died to bugs last October; previously, I had nowhere that got enough sun to consider a garden. I tried to talk the wife into a small raised garden this year, but she wasn't interested; I wonder if suggesting herbs might intrigue her more, since I suspect they require a bit less maintenance than vegetables. Although now that I appear to be living in a brave new world of working from home, I suppose I could just tend to it myself now . . .


----------------------------------------------------------


In our excitement for sauteed mushrooms and onions, we, uh, completely forgot the garlic for the potatoes. Didn't really matter, they were still excellent (and, at least for my mom, with the little tray of bacon/chives/cheddar/sour cream, probably the star of the show. She had the filet


Hopper posted:

You could make a pan sauce from the bag juices instead of mixing them into the mash. I imagine it would make your mash taste of meat and this may take away from the flavour contrast between mash and steak. But I have never mixed it in so just spitballing.

Awhile back, we kinda stumbled on the fact that adding the juices is an extremely lazy way to bring some flavor to the potatoes, and the sour cream helps with the fact that the juices make the potatoes a little watery. You might be right that perhaps some contrast is lost, but I guess the idea was that in a restaurant, my favorite bites of potatoes were the ones that were soaked in steak juice. Since these steaks don't really leak much juice, I just decided to approach the issue directly



Anne Whateley posted:

I would either do a pan sauce from the jus or else use it for the mushrooms.

If you want the creamiest mashed potatoes, you want butter and cream, not sour cream. You could do the 50/50 if you want to go nuts. Imo doing roasted garlic would be more convenient as well as better than sautéed mashed garlic.

I would definitely roast or firepit the broccoli rather than steaming it. You could also include a lemony element as a contrast with the richness of everything else.

Pan Sauce is something we both need to learn. I've tried Alton Brown's method from his prime rib flowerpot episode, but every time we tried, we just ended up with burnt sadness and gave up after a few tries. I suppose I should just look up some other way to do it - there's certainly no reason why it should be beyond our capabilities, but it's just never worked out yet. Thanks for pointing out that I should definitely give it a try again.

Apparently, the broccoli was frozen broccoli, not fresh. I'm not sure if that's roastable or not, but the wife said she was really looking forward to the plain steamed broccoli with just a touch of salt, so I'll have to try those suggestions another time!


----------------------------------------------------------


Thanks for the tips, everyone! Even if I didn't act on them last night, it definitely gives me a lot to think about (and things to practice)!

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Carillon posted:

You can definitely roast frozen broccoli, my partner has started doing it through the pandemic and it's worked out great.

Do you need to thaw it first, or just put it on the heat and let it go?

If you can outline their basic gist of it, I'd be more than happy for the info!

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Beaucoup Haram posted:

Getting a warranty replacement for my Wifi + BT model, does anyone know if it's possible to buy or maybe 3d print a replacement plastic skirt, the bit where the metal shroud slots in ? Mine completely degraded - just comes off in chunks now but if I can repair it and give it to someone who doesn't have one I'd like to.

Is that on an Anova?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Herbchat: Thanks for the tips! I'll put a DIY project on my list for making some sort of cage to put potted herbs in or something (to protect from animals)

Sous Vide Chat: does freezing meat impact the texture at all? I'm really struggling with getting the right texture on the larger, "inner" part of a ribeye, and I'm not sure if that's due to having frozen them, or if I really need to adjust the temp. (For reference, I was puddling for 3 hours at 135, which made for amazing Strip and Tenderloin [unfrozen]. I expected Ribeye to do as well, but it didn't seem to.)

The ribeyes I had seemed to have an "outer" section that was much deeper red and fantastic texture; on the "inner" portion the grain seemed almost too "fine". It was tender and juicy, but the mouthfeel was . . . off. I'm not sure how to describe it. It was also less "red" and more "pink", which makes me wonder if that section is a different muscle and more susceptible to overcooking or what.

Of course, it's possible that this is just the nature of ribeye and I've never noticed before?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


qutius posted:

Try bumping up the temp just a bit to 137. I've found, along with some research, that ribeyes do best with just a tad higher than you might normally do a steak

I thought that as well, but I figured 135 was already "high" for what most considered steaks.

I'll give it a go on the next one! (Or 3 . . . I feel like some testing may be in order)

Thanks though, I was at a loss of what to do and was wondering if I needed to go down in temp. It does make some sense if I need to go the other direction, though.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD posted:

Posted in the kitchen equipment thread as well but curious what my Sous Vide Bros find to be the best vacuum sealer.

Quoting myself from awhile go, but I'm pretty fond of this one:

Not sure your price range; I started my journey with a $20 Seal-a-Meal unit that was . . . functional. Mostly. It was tough to use, because it didn't have a manual switch to go from pulling vacuum to activating the sealer; it just had to hit its own internal cutoff. I suspect the pressure sensor is what died on it, since it would still pull decent vacuum but would never stop.

When it died, I took the opportunity to get this model:
https://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-Non-Roll-Vacuum-Sealing-FM2000-015/dp/B01BK8UDCA

I feel like the ability to kill the suck and begin sealing immediately is a nice one. If the food is a bit too juicy, I'll just hit the switch and get the seal completed before the juice sneaks up into the unit. I figure that a 99% vacuum is good enough for my use case, and it keeps me from having to go through a cycle or three of wiping out the inside of the bag trying to achieve a seal.

I want to say I got this for $75 at Wal-Mart a year or so ago, but I'm not 100% at this point.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Thrasher posted:

I bought an Excalibur EPV12: https://excaliburdehydrator.com/collections/vac-sealer-machines/products/epv12-12-pro-vacuum-sealer

I’ve used their dehydrators before so took a leap at this product. I wanted their 15” model but I couldn’t order it direct to Canada for some reason and found the 12” one on Amazon for a deal. I just seal off a corner for 15” wide bags and it works fine.

It allows me to choose a duration of how long the element will be on for making a seal which is nice if you buy different vendors of plastic bags/rolls.

I also like how I don’t have to fit the bag into a slot to vac/seal it. The flip up lid with handle is perfect, especially for large items.

Here is a full packer brisket done with it recently:



Wait, they make 15" bags?!

Holy poo poo, this is possibly life-changing . . .

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


mls posted:

I had the same experience, it would even start to burn in some areas before the rest became crispy. I went ahead and put some in the air fryer prior to serving and had excellent results, highly recommend it. I may have also quickly pan fried them in bacon fat to increase the oil/fat content prior to putting them in the air fryer. There are a few foods that I like to finish in the air fryer (namely al pastor and carnitas), mine is Philips and does a much better job than my convection oven.

Out of curiosity, how hot does your air fryer get? I think mine maxes out at 400F.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Sentient Data posted:

I find that a lower temperature is no good for chicken breast, the texture is too gelatinous below at least 160

Yeah, BSCB is very interesting in the absolutely wide array of textures you can make it by playing with the temp.

I don't recall offhand what temp I use for it, but I do know that what I've come to enjoy is something my dad immediately spits out because apparently he had a very bad experience with undercooked/raw chicken in the past. However, even when I up the temp to get the classic chicken breast texture, it's still more tender and moist than anything I ever made in a regular pan.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


TraderStav posted:

That's what I normally do for the soft boiled eggs I put in my ramen. I wanted to give the SV a try since I thought it'd have been better. Probably just stick with the tride and true going forward.

I love my instapot for hard boiled eggs, they come out perfect.

This may not be the place, but how do you do hard-boiled eggs in an instant pot?

I have one, maybe I should give it a try . . .

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


My only bit of advice is to try and set up the "lid" so that there is a place to vent a little steam, far away from the SV unit.

My first foray into modifying a container for SV ended up with a gap next to the unit, and over time steam worked its way under the touchscreen. While a bed of rice was able to resolve that issue, it has happened multiple times and I am in the middle of reworking that particular enclosure.

The subsequent enclosures I made have a small vent hole at the far end and a much better seal around the SV unit to prevent that from happening again.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


life is killing me posted:

I have one, but I was concerned about the sous vide controller and where I’d put it. It has a clamp but not one that could clip to the cooler. The bucket has been doing fine so far

NE: and also was concerned about whether the plastic in there could handle the heat, and had less information at the time than I had about the Home Depot bucket

For the coolers I use, cutting has been involved.

They've worked great for what they do! I've found that there's been a bit of nuance to it, and I've had to modify designs slightly over time. The worst part about coolers in my experience is that you can't see through them to see how the bag is doing.

I've considered going back to clear cambros and trying to figure out some sort of semi-permanent insulation solution. I don't know how to sew, or I'd probably just make some insulated wrap for the thing with a flap I could pull back to look in the side as needed.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Lawnie posted:

When I make pork tenderloin I usually sear the exterior of the whole thing then slice into thick medallions and sear those on both sides. I bet you could slice fully-cooked pork loin (not the same thing as tenderloin) from the SV and sear it in a hot pan then make a sauce from the resulting fond. If you don’t try it, I might sometime.

This is what I had been doing as well. I treat it a lot like boneless skinless chicken breast, in a way.

If you get the whole loin from a Costco or something, there usually is a bit of a fat cap on it that'll sear up nice. Otherwise when I'm searing, I try to get some sort of fat or oil into the pan to help with that. Although now that I say that, I can't help but wonder if I shouldn't be considering using the grill because it likely can get a lot hotter than the pan . . . .

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Imasalmon posted:

I've been using an Anova Precision for a few years now, and loving it. I use an old Foodsaver vacuum sealer that my folks gave me since they weren't using it and it has been fine. My wife just offered to get me this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08GZH6Y36/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glc_fabc_8EN8R4754DKTRZ4WM0NK for my birthday, since some friends of ours have one, but I wanted to get some opinions before shelling out the money. I think it would be nice to not have to worry about excess moisture before sealing, and I could do some fun things with wet ingredients, but I'm not very sophisticated with techniques, so I'm probably overlooking something.

What do y'all think?

I suppose the real question here is: what does she want you to cook that you can't with your current sealer?

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Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

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Ultimate Mango posted:

I put a loaf of sourdough in there right after it came out of the (Anova precision) oven. Impossibly crackly skin with amazing soft interior.

You put the bread in the chamber vac?

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