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YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Nice thread, very informative, much wow!

I have a Sous Vide Supreme Demi (+/- 1.8F) that I got on sale for $200 two years ago. Up until a month or so ago, I was using the baggy method. I bought a Rival vacuum sealer for like $20, and to be honest, when I ran out of the bags for that, I switched back to baggies.

Anyway, I've got a bone-in ribeye going at 131F for ~1 hour, dry aged in the fridge over the last day, and seared in the cast iron at about a 6 on the dial for 1.5 minutes. I used to be a New York strip steak guy when grilling, but well-marbled ribeyes and tbones benefit greatly from the sous vide method.

I regularly do mass chicken cooking. BSCB plus a little stock, for about 1.5-2h at 146F to pasteurize. Then they can be diced up and used for any other dish, or just seasoned and seared. I personally like making different chicken salads for lunch, for varieties' sake.

Douglas Baldwin's charts are invaluable until you get comfortable enough to just wing it.

Things that will challenge your food-life:
- Perfect poached eggs
- Custard Salmon
- lovely beef cuts cooked into perfection unseen by most men
- Medium pork, a delicacy feared
- What are these vegetables even made of, dang
- EZ mode custard, yogurt, cheeses
- Weed butter/oil. Yep.
- Legit turkey. Get something wild or well-raised, and it will blow your stupid mind.

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YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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LTBS posted:

What would happen if I were to set a steak or piece of chicken (lets just say ribeye/chicken breast) in the puddle machine for 10 hours (at their respective temperatures for mid-rare / cooked for the chicken)?

Would it break down and become a mushy mess? Would it be just like I was cooking it for 2 hours?

I do chicken 12-24 hours sometimes when I forget about it. It tastes a little more like boiled chicken, but still very juicy. You'll always want to do beef over 130F if you're going to cook it over an hour. The tougher/leaner the cut, the longer you'll want to cook. Short ribs are great somewhere between 48 and 72 hours. A brisket can be perfect in 24-48. Tri-tip doesn't suffer from 12-24. But if you have a steak cut, 45 minutes to however long pasteurization takes is preferable. Even for long cook times, you don't really end up with a "falling apart" end product because of the higher moisture content left in the meat. So you won't get that dry shredded brisket, just a nicely done slice of brisket that is fork-tender.

Fish is an easy one to do after work, since nearly all but the thickest of the thick cuts of fish take about 20 minutes.

Wait until you get some good pork ribs in there. Mmmmmm.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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deimos posted:

Something to keep in mind when cooking sous vide for storage: As soon as you open the bag pasteurization goes out the window.

Definitely this, if you're going to cook in bulk or for freezing, using more bags is preferable to putting everything in one big one. That way you can freeze and thaw smaller batches without worrying about contamination. Pasteurized meat will last a couple days longer in the fridge, even after being opened, though.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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BraveUlysses posted:

I feel like I should give this a try, but I'm worried that I am completely spoiled by having a smoker and it simply won't compare to smoked ribs.

No way dude, do both. Puddle, chill, season, and then a short smoking. You don't need as long, obviously, and still get a perfect rib and big flavors. I personally just throw them on the grill for a few minutes to get some color, but a little smoke is fantastic!

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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LTBS posted:

Awesome. Awesome to the Max.

Just ordered the Anova. Gonna run by one of the restaurant supply places around here and grab a decent sized bin and find some ping pong balls somewhere else. One last question before I actually get it... Do you even have to change out the water in the tub/pot?

It gets nasty after a while, yeah. Even with no leaks. I probably use my Demi 3-4 times a week, and should probably clean it like once a week. The water level will go down over time, so you will need to add, at least.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Safety Dance posted:

What is the deal with the ping pong balls?

They reduce the surface area of the exposed water, so less evaporation. They're also a decent insulator/lid for those using pots or buckets instead of a standalone unit.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Pretty much. The lids on the SVS Demi are like thin sheet metal, so it's not really a big deal. I have a piece of heavy felted wool that I keep over the top, but it doesn't really make a difference.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Lolcano Eruption posted:

I looked all over the OP for this, and perhaps I missed it, but what are some good books or websites that provide a good overview of SVing different types of meats as well as temperature/time charts?

I'm considering that Douglas Baldwin book that seems to be referenced often in this thread. What about a book/site with pictures similar to the OP where it shows how it looks after SVing at different temps?

It wasn't linked in the OP, but just read all of this page for youtube videos, charts, and pictures of cooked end-products: http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

This site has a few good articles about SV, the steak one is a nice start: http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/03/...vide-steak.html

The pics in the OP are from this informative site:
http://www.cookingissues.com/primer...res-the-charts/
http://www.cookingissues.com/primer...-and-sous-vide/
http://www.cookingissues.com/primer...thout-a-vacuum/

Here is a hands-on of how beef looks between different times ranges and temps:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMaOTsIhyPw

That channel has a few good videos on SV and modernist techniques: http://www.youtube.com/user/chefste...iew=1&flow=grid

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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nwin posted:

Ive been wondering-what's the reason for the bag in a vacuum seal? To me it makes sense you would do it so that none of the product remains out of the water due to it floating because of air left in the bag, thus creating a product that gets heated to the same temperature/consistency all around, but is there anything other than that?

On the same note, why am I adding butter or oil to the steaks and chicken I've sous vide already, when I still add oil to the pan prior to cooking?

It really is mostly for the best contact area between the meat and the water. Have air bubbles screws with that, and having a fat in there can take up those spaces and transfer heat well. I personally don't add a fat unless I'm adding a flavoring, herbs or whatever. The fat will help circulate the flavors a bit in the bag. You should be finishing the steaks with a little butter, not cooking them in it, anyway. That stupid Ducasse article made people into buttersteaktrolls.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Choadmaster posted:

Anyway, I dropped some short ribs in for a 48-hour cook at the same time (again, 135 degrees), so they should be done tonight. Problem: Gas has appeared in the bag. It's not a leak, since until the gas appeared the bag was fully submerged. After 24 hours there was enough gas in the bag to cause one edge to surface. The only possible source I can imagine for this gas is bacteria, so we're not going to be eating these short ribs after all.

I am going to let them finish cooking just to feel the texture at 48 hours, and then maybe I'll buy another set of short ribs and try again. Why did this happen and how the gently caress do I stop it so I don't go wasting all my money? I'm thinking I'll pre-sear the short ribs just to kill off surface bacteria.

Did you use a vacuum sealer or just the baggy method? When I use baggies, I always end up with a bit of air at the end of cooking. Usually it's more prevalent in cuts that were injected with water or saline, air bubbles and such in the meat. Follow your nose.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Walked posted:

Has anyone done top round (specifically londoin broil style cut) SV? My local grocery has it on sale and its cheap as hell. That said, googling seems to have mixed results on this one.

Any first hand experience? Probably do anyways just to try.

Puddling is great for top round cuts. I usually finish under a broiler with whatever, but any cheapo cut benefits greatly from a 12-48 hour soak.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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BraveUlysses posted:

That thing looks great but I'm going to test out the pork belly version this week and if it goes well, i'm making it for thanksgiving too.

Maaan, I wasn't too impressed by the pork belly version. The fat got too...weird. That said, I'm going to do a dry run of a turkey breast this weekend, with a pan-sear finish. 146F for however long to pasteurize, with the rub in the middle and trussed.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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BraveUlysses posted:

So, I'd like to make some infused oil. Any temp suggestions?

Just like fridging the oil, it takes longer at lower temps. An hour at 180F seems to work pretty well, but I've had good results with 165F for 4-6 hours. It will taste green, for sure, but definitely depends on what type of product you're working with.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Base Emitter posted:

Cool, thanks. An hour or two isn't bad at all.

You will Probably Not Die cooking a 1-1.5"/0.5-1lb steak at 133F for 45 minutes. It won't be pasteurized, but you're not going to live forever.

Project for Crimmis: individual wellies

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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you sent the steel through the hardening process. stainless steel is potentially terrible for you, so depending on the heat source, you're going to die.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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you should see my tongs bb

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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mcbrite posted:

Does anybody know from experience if I can just char the poo poo out of the outside to get that nice crust, without even having to dirty a pan?

same idea, high heat quickly, although it would be a waste of charcoal compared to wiping out a cast iron pan.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Guys I have been burnt out on puddling for a while. What should I make to get me out of the puddlerut?

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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Ehhh usually a lot of chicken for putting in other things, burgs, steaks, meat-on-bone cuts, but not often herb packs or such.

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YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

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I think I want to do this: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...html?ref=search

In the comments, Kenji says skin on, but it doesn't say in the recipe whether the skin is removed before puddling. I've had some weird experiences with belly skin and puddling, so: skin on or off?

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