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heyfresh888
Feb 8, 2010


The easiest way to accomplish sous-vide PROTEIN at home is to use oil as your liquid in the bath and cold metal to adjust the temperature. Oil is a lot easier to control vs water. On my electric stove at home I can maintain 58C for cooking lamb fairly well. It will bobble at 58.0 to 58.7 over a 20 minute period. I put a few spoons in the freezer to dip in the bath if I need to drop the temp slightly by stirring it with the cold spoon.

Having cooked protein extensively at the 3 michelin level, sous-vide is easily the most forgiving. Nobody on planet earth would ever be able to tell the difference from something cooked at 58 or 59 for an hour. I guess if you are doing longer 48 hour and 72 hour processing you could run into some trouble. People may try to tell you semantic differences, but under the light of the dining room everything is the same. Variations in the protein are a huge part as well, how it was butchered, age after slaughter, the lot it came from etc etc. Unless it's undercooked severely, it's hard to tell. Obviously a variation of probably more than 3 degrees over would make a difference, but a short spike for the most part isn't bad.

I've braised short ribs at home because my tap water, it is extremely consistent. I filled a small ice chest with canola. I connected some surgical tubing to my sink tap and then ran a coiled length through oil and then back out. I caught the water in a 5 gallon bucket, to not waste the water and measure my output. I managed 54~57C (warmed up when I was asleep) for 72 hours. Having done it before with the best possible Polyscience circulators before, it was nearly the same aside from the quality of protein I was using at home.

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heyfresh888
Feb 8, 2010


Shadowhand00 posted:

My biggest question about sous vide is about the pasteurization element - when you sous vide chicken, do you need to extend cooking time by x before it is pasteurized? Or does the sear generally kill most of the bacteria?

You have to heat the protein up after it's cooked sous-vide anyways. Eating something at those temperatures would feel tepid in your mouth. Typically if you are cooking sous-vide you aren't really at the point of having to hammer you food because of how filthy it is. Most poultry can be consumed raw in the united states with out getting sick from it, same with pork as long as you handle it properly after you purchase it. You can actually buy, for lack of a better word, "sushi" grade jidori chicken in the US.

heyfresh888 fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2013 around 19:25

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