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TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


a foolish pianist posted:

This is easily the best two-dollar steak I've ever had, and it was really fun to make. Using a larger steak would only make it better, as would being a bit more careful with the blowtorch while searing. All in all, though, tonight's sous vide experiment is a serious success. A ~six-ounce tri tip made for a delicious meal.

I've used that same cooler for SV steak, so I commend you on that. Next time sear your steak on a ridiculously hot cast iron pan. Doing this will give you a much more even crust, compared to your torch.

Also, I've never seen a SV steak look pale like that before searing. Usually, steaks look like they have never been cooked. It seems to me like you managed to overcook the outside of your steak while SVing it. Maybe add more water next time and be sure to mix the water every 30 min or so with a big spoon to keep the temperature more even.

If that was a 2 dollar steak, you can keep trying different methods of SV and not feel bad about it. Try cooking it for longer next time - maybe 3 hours or so. Report back with your steak results.

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TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


Goon posted:

Looking to cook some squid in the waterbath, no baggy. The Anova manual says to not use any non-water based liquids. Will it be an issue for the circulator if I cook something that leaves organic residues in the water?

Hahaha. In my mind, I read this post as a sexual innuendo and it made me laugh. "No baggie", "non water-based liquids", and "organic residue". Those are too good to be true.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


geetee posted:

I think I cracked my granite counter top while sous vizzling. Found a hairline crack under the Cambro. It's been pretty cold lately and the counter just sucks it up, but the area underneath was toasty warm/hot.

What temperature were you using?

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


geetee posted:

I think I was doing short ribs at 140F for a couple days while it was something like 0F overnight. Obviously didn't get that cold in my kitchen, but it can get pretty chilly in there.

Its very unlikely that the sous vide broke your countertop. I could see it maybe happening if you put a bath of like 170 degree water directly on top of a 50 degree counter, but if you started with tap water and heated it up, it should not have caused it.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


I made the Serious Eats pork buns tonight, and it was stupidly delicious. I also made ramen using David Chang's Momofuku broth with shredded pork and chicken, green onions, poached eggs and shiitakes. This was easily the best Asian meal I've ever made. The pork buns were just stupidly delicious and the ramen was light yet flavorful. If you have not made either of these dishes, I really suggest that you should.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


Huge_Midget posted:

Is there a goon consensus as to which puddle machine is best between the Sansaire, Anova, and the Nomiku? I read the Serious Eats review and am currently leaning toward the Anova, but I thought I'd ask on here first for first hand experiences.

The Nomiku is the worst of the bunch due to its limited water height issue (long cooks are out unless you have a covered container that is the correct height for it). The other two are a split decision based on if you want a turn knob or an LCD.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


I may be mixing things up in my head, so I may be completely wrong here...was either the Anova or Sansaire developed by a team/company that made laboratory-grade equipment?

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


The searz-all would be great to finish things like a SV bone-in chicken breast since the skin cannot lay flat on a pan.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


Breadnought posted:

Any suggestions for temp/time on horse meat? I've got a friend who has 2kg of thinly sliced (think Korean BBQ sized) horse meat. She's going to use some to make a Croatian dish called "zgvacet" but has offered to let me cook some sous vide. Any suggestions?

SV is not worth it for thinly sliced meats (less than 0.5 inch/12mm). You're much better off searing it off Korean BBQ style than SVing it because you will just end up cooking it the same anyways.

On an unrelated note...I cooked at top round steak at 135 for 24 hours with salt and a 5 pepper blend. The outside of the steak was mostly pond scum green. Was this due to some sort of color transfer from the green peppercorns? It did not smell or taste bad in any way.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


TATPants posted:

On an unrelated note...I cooked at top round steak at 135 for 24 hours with salt and a 5 pepper blend. The outside of the steak was mostly pond scum green. Was this due to some sort of color transfer from the green peppercorns? It did not smell or taste bad in any way.

I thought that I should report that I am neither sick nor dead from my green steak experience. Perhaps there was some blood left in the steak, which might have turned green?

Anyways, I rebagged it and cooked it for another day to pasteurize it and it was literally the worst steak ever. It was so dry it was almost inedible. So I will not be SVing a top round steak ever again.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


I just made the glazed carrots from SeriousEats and if you have not made them, then you absolutely should. They are so drat tasty. My only problem with them was that I cut the carrots 'faux-tourne' per the recipe, which left a lot of air in the bag so I had to weight it down. Next time I'll keep the carrots mostly whole.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


TATPants fucked around with this message at Jun 10, 2017 around 00:06

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


TATPants fucked around with this message at Jun 10, 2017 around 00:07

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


TATPants fucked around with this message at Jun 10, 2017 around 00:07

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


I just ate some beef ribs that I puddled for 72 hours at 140F, which I grilled after they cooled down a bit. They were fantastic - tender and incredibly beefy. I made a jous/gravy/sauce from the bag drippings, which was completely unnecessary as the meat was tasty and moist enough. Served them with smashed potatoes and sauted green beans.

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


wheez the roux posted:

as much as i hate the term "vizzle" at least it doesn't make me want to punch someone in their dumb face the way any given instance of the word "puddling" or "puddled" does

What term would you rather use? Sous vide is not a verb, so the common replacements for 'to cook using the sous vide method' are 'to puddle' or 'to vizzle'. Yes, both sound dumb, but they are better than saying 'how should I under vacuum my steak?'

TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


Ultimate Mango posted:

I can confirm that this is an excellent approach. I recall I also baked the skin sandwiched between two sheet pans and that worked as an alternative to frying.

Now I'm kicking myself for not doing sous vide chicken this way. And eating all the skin.

Chicken thighs work great this way, as well. Sous vide the thighs, rip off the skin, render the fat from the skins, then fry them on medium high in their own fat. If you treat the skins like bacon - flipping them constantly and then draining on a paper towel - they turn out great. The skins are even better if you re-fry them again after letting them sit for a few minutes on the paper towel.

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TATPants
Mar 28, 2011


Ciaphas posted:

Does that work at all for uneven stuff like chicken breasts or am I just gonna end up with alternately burned and unseared skin?

Things only brown when they're in contact with the pan, so it won't help your chicken breast skin. What I do is rip the skin off and fry it like bacon. It looks weird because you end up with a flat piece of crispy skin, but whatever.

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