Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«4 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


How long do those Anovas take to ship? I ordered one (black) a few days ago and haven't heard a thing about it shipping (or being backordered). I'm impatient to get my vizzle on...

On that note, what's the best thing for a first-timer to try? Steaks?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I was actually thinking I'd put that as #2 on my list... I don't have the patience to wait 48-72 hours for my first meal with this thing .

Just got an email that my Anova shipped. Hooray!

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Good points here.

I've been looking at various things to try and lobster has caught my attention. Anyone done it before? There seems to be such a wide variety of temperatures (~120-140 F) in the recipes I've seen. I'll probably end up doing 135 for convenience sake if I'm going to throw it in with the short ribs. I'm also curious to try some crab using the same method as the lobster.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Thanks, SubG and others. I've only tried cooking lobster a couple times and didn't end up with great results so I'm hoping the sous vide method might be a bit more idiot proof. If not, at least it'll give this idiot incentive to try cooking lobster again.

About steaks, what is the goon consensus on pre-searing? Should I do that? Or just post-sear? Or both? Ultimately I'll have to experiment and see what works for me, but for the first few steaks I'd like to start off with whatever people think works best

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


So my Anova came on Friday, and I immediately went overboard with cooking more than I had any need to eat. I tried steak, lobster, and shrimp the first night.

Steak: Great. But I already could cook a steak, so this would have been hard to gently caress up.

Lobster & shrimp: I cooked these both for 30 minutes at the same 135 degree temp as the steaks out of necessity, though that seemed to be a reasonable target temp anyway. The lobster came out the way all my other (non-sous-vide) lobster attempts came out, which is to say the texture just wasn't right. Not tender at all, closer to rubbery (did I overcook, or undercook, or cook too long? I'll have to experiment). Shrimp were a little off too; they almost seemed underdone, though the recipe I was looking at recommended 136 degrees and I don't see a single degree having any major effect. We decided to sauté the leftover shrimp for a little while and that improved them considerably IMO.


Anyway, I dropped some short ribs in for a 48-hour cook at the same time (again, 135 degrees), so they should be done tonight. Problem: Gas has appeared in the bag. It's not a leak, since until the gas appeared the bag was fully submerged. After 24 hours there was enough gas in the bag to cause one edge to surface. The only possible source I can imagine for this gas is bacteria, so we're not going to be eating these short ribs after all.

I am going to let them finish cooking just to feel the texture at 48 hours, and then maybe I'll buy another set of short ribs and try again. Why did this happen and how the gently caress do I stop it so I don't go wasting all my money? I'm thinking I'll pre-sear the short ribs just to kill off surface bacteria.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I think there is significantly more gas in the bag now than when I first put the bag in there, but I'll give it a sniff when I open it up. If it's a product of bacteria it should be easy to tell

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


YEAH DOG posted:

Did you use a vacuum sealer or just the baggy method? When I use baggies, I always end up with a bit of air at the end of cooking. Usually it's more prevalent in cuts that were injected with water or saline, air bubbles and such in the meat. Follow your nose.

Vacuum sealer. Foodsaver 48zillion or whatever Costco is selling. I've only used it a few times now but I've noticed it seems to let a little (very little, but any at all seemed somewhat counterproductive) air back into the bag when it stops sucking and starts sealing. It really seems to me like there's more air in the bag than could possibly have been there at the start but perhaps all the little bubbles really do add up. I'll know in a few hours I suppose.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Took me a while to get around to posting, but we ate my weird-air-in-the-bag short ribs the other day after 48 hours in the bath @ 135 degrees.

Nothing smelled rancid when I opened the bag. Something did smell a little.... weird. But I thought the same thing about a pork chop my friend ordered at a steakhouse last week and he couldn't smell it at all. I think my nose is broken. In any case, I seared the short ribs on all sides in a cast iron pan and my friends and I got down to eating them.

Verdict: One of my friends said "tasty, but just make those delicious steaks next time" - the short ribs were too mushy for him. I almost have to agree (and this was after only 48 hours, god forbid I'd done 72). But I'll just try it again for 24 or 36 hours and see if that gives us a better consistency rather than give up and stick to steaks.

The other issue we saw was the fattiness; the fat does get very soft but it doesn't render out. Do I have to take the ribs apart (off the bone) before searing and render the fat off during the sear? I do prefer the experience of eating ribs bone-in.


Edit:

BraveUlysses posted:

Preheat the water and then take it off the burner if you're going to do that.

That's a good idea, but next time he'll hopefully just remember to fill it with hot water!

Choadmaster fucked around with this message at Oct 23, 2013 around 19:03

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Chemmy posted:

You won't meaningfully render fat out of meat by searing it.

I hear you can if you put it fat-side-down, especially after it's softened up so much (hell, my pan had nearly a half-centimeter of fat in it after searing 8 ribs without even trying that). But I'd really rather not tear my ribs apart to do that.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


That's funny, because my roommate who has been complaining for years about the lack of a hot tub at my house saw the Anova I just bought and threatened to buy a barrel and make a hot tub with it.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


SubG posted:

That works if the fat is in a convenient layer all together, which it really shouldn't be in shortribs.

http://sassyspoon.files.wordpress.c...rt-ribs-raw.jpg

There is often a fairly thick layer of fat running through short ribs just above the bone. The front three in that photo show it off quite well.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Nobody minds the marbling of the meat. It's that (occasionally very thick) layer of fat a centimeter above the bone that results in mouthfuls of fat. I can't trim it without taking the meat off the bone, which as I said I'd rather not do. Though it would save me from having to try to render it off, which would require pulling it off the bone also.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I'm the other guy who had the bloating bag issue. Mine smelled fine so we ate them. Everyone is still alive. I can't remember if I did them at 130 or 135 though.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Random Hero posted:

So you pre-seared the brisket? Do you have any after pictures to show? I am very interested in doing a brisket soon...

I have a 48 hour brisket going (167 degrees... I tried 133 and 140 and didn't really like it) that I pre-seared that will be done tomorrow. I can take pics if you want.

In a related note, I put ghee in the bags with the brisket; never had trouble with fats in long cooks, and brisket isn't very fatty. However, I did notice this morning that the fat seems to float to a top corner of the bag once some of the meat juices fill the bag, so who knows if it does any good.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


lousy hat posted:

Yeah the garlic stays basically raw at meat-cooking temps, which also leads to concerns about botulism for longer cooks. So pre-cook, or use garlic powder.

Whether the garlic stays "raw" or not is irrelevant. Bacteria die (or growth is inhibited) based on the temperature (and time at temperature). Clostridium Botulinum doesn't grow under 50 degrees F. or over 122 degrees F. Other bacteria have similar ranges, plus or minus a few degrees. So long as you're through the danger zone and into the 132+ degree range in a reasonable time, there should be nothing to worry about. (Bacillus Cereus survives to 131 and is the most common culprit in "food poisoning.") The FDA is a little conservative and recommends 135.

I am not an expert, do your own research before performing any actions that may be construed as "eating." Illness and death by "eating" are solely the reader's responsibility.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Zorak of Michigan posted:

If I pasteurize avocado

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Maybe your guac was tastier than the other guy's so your top layer had more turnover. This calls for a controlled experiment (which I am far too lazy to do myself).

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


DiverTwig posted:

Just had my first flat iron steak (labeled as top blade steak). drat, that was a good steak. 134 for about 6 hours. The connective tissue in the middle didn't make it too bad. I made three of them and only cut it out on one of them. Didn't really notice a difference, just ate around it on the ones that still had it in. Not the juiciest of steaks, but flavorful and tender as hell.

I tested a flat iron a few weeks ago, vizzled along with some ribeyes. The ribeyes were great, as always, but nobody (me included) really liked the flat iron. The ribeyes were more flavorful and far more tender. I only did ~3 hours though. Was that the problem? Or did I get a lovely flat iron (Whole Foods meat is generally pretty drat good)? (Questions are for anyone to answer, not specifically directed at DiverTwig.)

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Mostly texture, I'd say. It didn't come out dry though. I'll do another one for 6-12 hours before I give up on flat irons.

I made some less-than-great ribeyes last night... I'm always worried about over-salting steaks (despite never having done so) and they came out sort of bland. However, I managed to make up for it with this loving awesome dessert. The apples come out soft but just solid enough to cut with a fork. It was beautiful.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I've been using the $5 Rubbermaid with a hole cut in the lid. It works okay, but gets overly flexible in the heat and starts bulging due to the weight of the water so the lid doesn't really fit. I ordered a cambro off Amazon that will hopefully arrive today. But the cheapo Rubbermaid solution works okay.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Amazon delivered mine today as expected.

It does look nicer than a cooler on the counter. But I chose it over a cooler specifically because it is transparent. I like to be able to quickly see if multiple items got circulated into a cluster, or if something is starting to float or whatever.

Edit: I remember someone asked earlier about cutting a hole in the lid. Don't know if it was answered, but I just used a 3" hole saw (2 7/8 would also work) on a drill for the circular portion, and a hacksaw for the straight bits. Easy.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Choadmaster fucked around with this message at Apr 5, 2014 around 05:59

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Ultimate Mango posted:

That is a nice hole. I did mine on the short side, interesting you did the long side.

I stick it in a corner against the microwave and the wall (not as pictured), so that open long side was the most convenient. I wish the Anova didn't protrude so much out the back so I could put it on the short side that's against the wall, but it works well enough as is.

I had a 2 3/4" hole saw and a 3" hole saw... The former seemed to be the exact diameter of the Anova so I worried it would be an impossibly tight fit. I went with the 3", which leaves about 1/8" gap all around the Anova. I don't know if they make 2 7/8" hole saws, but if they do and you have to buy one anyway, I'd go with that. Not that the gap is really a big deal, since much more space is left open on the back side of the cutout anyway. I might seal this with a damp towel for hotter cooks (160+ F).

Edit: the London broil looks really nice, but 125 seems a bit low, especially for 4 whole hours. Let us know if you die or come down with anything.

Edit 2: Take your time with the hole saw. The cambro lid actually felt much less brittle than it looked when cutting through it, but you still don't want to risk cracking it. And of course you'll want a piece if scrap wood underneath the lid as you drill through (this should be obvious but I don't want to get blamed for a hole in someone's countertop).

Choadmaster fucked around with this message at Apr 5, 2014 around 06:05

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I have an Anova and I can't find any disassembly pics of the Sansaire so I don't know of this applies... The Anova can start making a grindy noise if the impeller blades aren't perfectly straight (easy to do when putting the bottom shell back on if you're not careful) and the impeller gets unbalanced and hits the sides of the case. Is that the sort of noise your Sansaire makes?

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Has anyone tried any of the reusable sous vide bags? I'm thinking about getting an Anova as a gift for a friend who has never tried sous vide before, but I know he will have an issue with the waste involved in one-time-use vacuum bags.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


That seems to match what I read elsewhere too, plus those silicone ones only seem to come in 1 liter size. I guess he'll have to deal.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Gasses are fluids, man. Also you missed his point that air is removed from the interstices of a porous food - that's what allows the inner pressure to reduce and the outer pressure to then compress the food.

Edit: Try vaccing (vazzling?) a soft sponge, for an extreme example.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I thought we were talking about stuff that was chopped (burgers, for example). I will agree with you that a steak ain't really going anywhere.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Clever device, congrats and good luck!

That said, how's the power usage on that thing? Being (apparently) uninsulated I have to imagine keeping that water mass <40 all day (and then heating it all up!) isn't particularly efficient.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


deimos posted:

Double wall makes it pretty much the same as a coleman cooler. Or do you think most colemans typically used for SV are full of insulation?

Ah, didn't notice the double wall on first look.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


nwin posted:

Holy gently caress best burgers ever.

Had some sirloin stew meat and some short ribs in the freezer. Ground up the meat from both and made burgers with them. Sous vide @ 130 for 30 minutes then a quick sear in the cast iron. loving amazing.

How'd you season them? Salt and pepper just before searing or something else?

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


nwin posted:

I ground the meat in my kitchenaid grinder attachment, then added salt/pepper/garlic powder, made the patties about 6 oz each, 1" thick and 4-5" in diameter.

I also *lightly* salted them after I took them out of the sandwich bags and dried them off.

In my experience, mixing the seasoning into the meat requires far more seasoning for the same amount of flavor when compared to just seasoning the outside (it is a mystery). I haven't vizzled a burger yet though. I'll try it your way first!

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Hypnolobster posted:

Mixing or grinding salt into beef also gives it a terribly gross sausage texture instead of nice loose burger.

http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives...round-beef.html

Fascinating, thanks.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I did a 133 brisket once. I didn't like it. It wasn't bad, but it was more like prime rib than brisket. I like my 177 briskest better. They're brisket.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


I love this apple-based dessert: http://emilysculinaryadventures.blo...-craziness.html

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


You can safely boil the can laying on its side (probably even standing upright). As long as you keep the can submerged it shouldn't explode. It can't get significantly hotter than boiling temperature of the water around it so it can't build up any significant pressure either.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


You're doing it wrong. Turn up the water bath to 320 degrees F and dip the bag for fifteen seconds.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Not a bad idea really. My biggest problem with putting heavy poo poo onto floating bags is it slides off and the bag bobs back up. Two magnets on either side would solve that problem.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Falcon2001 posted:

Question: I'm cooking a four pound chuck roast and overnight the water level dropped so around 5-10mm of the bag was exposed. Is this basically 'welp, you're hosed' mode or can I just go on with it? I'm cooking at 145 for what it's worth. Teach me not to have a cooler.

It's fine. It doesn't have to be perfectly covered by the water. While we're at it, a few little air bubbles don't matter either (some people really seem to worry about not getting every last bit of air out). Heat isn't just conducted from the water through the bag to the meat, but conducts within the meat itself - a bubble or a small portion of a large piece out of the water isn't going to have any effect. It's not like the center of your giant chunk of chuck is anywhere near contact with the water either.

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Straker posted:

I feel like I remember seeing a SV chocolate cake done by some pro chef a few years back.

Anyway, now that Anova is done with their kickstarter, they keep bugging me to fill out my reward survey... so who still wants one? Thinking $130 shipped (be nice if you could cover paypal fees though), US only. I'll have four extras, so I guess first come first served, just post in the thread so I/we can see and I don't get a ton of PMs or people in thread confused if I still have any.

Need contact info and color (red, white or black), and remember these won't actually be shipping for a few months so please don't be flaky or a super recent reg or anything!

edit: also, they are providing 220V cookers with AU, EU or UK plugs too if someone wants one for some reason, but still not interested in shipping outside the US myself, I'll assume 120V unless people say otherwise

I too would like one. PMed you.

In related news, my Anova started tripping my GFCI breakers the second I tried to turn it on. I tried giving it a month to dry out in case there was moisture inside the electronics but to no avail. I contacted their support and they sent me a prepaid shipping label to return the unit, and within a week I had a brand new one. Great service!

(The only hiccup was the support person's initial reaction was "check to make sure you're not overloading the breaker by plugging too many things into it"... I had to explain to her how GFCI works - these things have been required by US building codes since the early 70's, surely people know what they do by now?)

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Botulism spores survive that temperature easily, are probably quite happy with the vacuum sealed environment, and start growing between 50-122 degrees F (fastest at 95). Not all strains of botulism produce an odor.

That said, since you found it at 120 it probably wasn't in that (highly un-ideal upper bound) danger zone for long and it's almost certainly fine. Just wanted to note that simply having cooked something at a high temp doesn't mean you've killed off everything. Spore-forming bacteria are hardy motherfuckers.

Since you ate it already, do keep us updated should you become paralyzed and/or die.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«4 »