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Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I am pretty excited for this thread. I got my VP112 a week ago and kickstarter a sansaire. The VP 113 is good but certainly can't pull as hard a vacuum as commercial machines.
I have been reading Modernist Cuisine and Under Pressure for the past year.
Been to Coi and é and a few other places and tried to ask intelligent questions of the chefs.
I haven't gone so crazy as to get a share of a cow but I am definitely working on sourcing better ingredients.
I think my first things will be short ribs, 65 (or 63?) degree eggs, and salmon. Carrots and artichokes should also be good.

Thanksgiving is going to be fun at my house this year.

I also have a digital controller for my smoker which does sous vide style temperature control. It uses a fan to maintain precise temperature of the fire and has a food temp probe, and can hold protein at a specific temp for a long time. For example, I start a pork shoulder at 225 and have it cook to and hold at 185 for 24 hours (as the pork approaches done temp the smoker ramps down to hold temp). I kind of want to try coi's smoked sous vide egg yolk this way (they smoke oil in a smoker to make smoked oil then put yolks in the smoked oil in an open container sitting in an immersion circulator bath, so no vacuum but precisely cooked yolks).

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Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


LTBS posted:

All I need now is a container.

Any suggestions? I plan on not leaving it on the counter ALL of the time, so it doesn't have to look pretty.

I went cam or plastic with a lid (I will cut out the profile of the sansaire). You can probably use whatever pot you have around big enough to hold the bag and water.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Keller talks about the whole lobster thing in his sous vide book, Under Pressure.it makes sense that really the benefit is in the controlled butter temperature rather than really needing the bag.

I went to Coi in San Francisco in August, and they to a 63(?) degree smoked egg yolk in a similar manner. They first make a container of smoked oil (put a container of oil in a makeshift smoker burning some locally foraged combustibles), then they nest a container of that oil with the IC so that the water heats the container of oil. Then they just out egg yolks in the smoked oil and let them hang there until service.

At home I actually had to get a rolling cart so I could move around my VP112 and all of my modernist accoutrements. Even got one of the heat capable cream chargers so I can do modernist hollandaise and cooked egg foams.

When will we be able to buy a combi oven for home use already?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Steve Yun posted:

Do you really need any books on sous vide?

No, but Under Pressure and Modernist Cuisine are pretty awesome.

If there is one thing that I am thankful for its the PolyScience Sous Vide Toolbox app. Easier than looking up a lot of reference charts, and its pretty easy to use.

I'm sure there is a web app that will do this for free somewhere...

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Genewiz posted:

I've only made 1 complete dish out of the book. It took me the whole weekend and in the end, it didn't feel like a good investment of my time. I just thumb through the book for flavor, time and temperature ideas. Good explanations of why certain things are done a specific way.

The explanations make the book worth it in my opinion.

A lot of the little tips are good though, like putting herbs wrapped in plastic with the ends snipped to avoid the herbs touching the protein directly and over-flavoring the place where they touch.

Under Pressure and Ad Hoc At Home are really an interesting pair, gives a broad view of Kellar and how to actually make use of it. But yeah, under pressure recipes seem like too much work in general.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


MrEnigma posted:

They haven't updated the iOS one in over a year, I wouldn't hold my breath.

This looks like a complete clone of the PolyScience app. I wonder who ripped off whom?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Heran Bago posted:

I think I've read somewhere that the bones can act like heating pipes and spread heat faster. Anyway here's this.



Wait a second, do you have a searchable digital copy of this book? How did that happen?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Heran Bago posted:

I always have low-effort awesome stock ready. Thanks puddle machine!

I wonder if the 220-volt international version of the Anova works any better for heating? Sometimes mine makes a loud noise and I have to turn it off and on again. I didn't see anything about it in the instructions and it's easy to take apart, clean, and put back together. Not sure what causes it.

How do you do sous vide stock? I just spent all day durning a dozen turkey wings into six cups of stock for gravy, and if I every et my sansaire and there's an easier way, I'm all for it!

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Featured Creature posted:

Ordering an Anova most likely this month, and I was wondering if it would be worthwhile to go ahead and spend the extra on a chamber sealer vs a regular Food Saver to replace my old one that stopped working. The additional $400+ is a lot, but if it's worth it...

I got a chamber dealer even before my puddle machine arrived. Heck, my Sansaire still isn't here and I love my chamber sealer.
There are online sites that have good deals on the Vacmaster consumer grade machine, mine was under $500 delivered.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


granpa yum posted:

Where'd you find a Vacmaster that low? Cheapest I've seen is 550 shipped. I'm probably going to buy one in a week or two so I would love to save a bit.

I think webstaurantstore with both a holiday coupon and their normal free shipping promotion. It was a great deal. Amazon has occasionally had it for a deal too, and prime shipping, but not around the time I bought.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


This leads us to the next logical question:
Can you use the puddle machine to clarify butter?

Google just seems to have lots of information on how to infuse into butter this way, but not actually clarifying.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


No Wave posted:

The cooler they are, the longer you can sear them...

So go from puddle to ice bath in the bag, chill for a bit and then sear in rocket hot pan for as short as possible to get crust?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Chemmy posted:

Sansaires are shipping in the US.

Got my email just now and came to post this. Since I am within an hour's drive of where these shipped from (or so I think) I may be sous vide-ing this weekend.
I cannot freaking wait.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Shadowhand00 posted:

They're shipping from Los Angeles, correct?

Yes, mine showed Ontario which is a little east of Los Angeles proper. Didn't show up yesterday, but maybe today.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I used the sansaire to do the starch trick for some potatoes (retrograde purée), pulled them and have some nearly two inch thick rib eyes in there now at 57C. By the time the potatoes are done the steaks will have been in there two hours and I will try out my new torch to crust the meat.
Should be good.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Ultimate Mango posted:

I used the sansaire to do the starch trick for some potatoes (retrograde purée), pulled them and have some nearly two inch thick rib eyes in there now at 57C. By the time the potatoes are done the steaks will have been in there two hours and I will try out my new torch to crust the meat.
Should be good.

Steaks were great. Perfectly cooked edge to edge, great crust with the torch, but set off the smoke detectors three times while torching.


The potatoes were a challenge... I couldn't get them through the food mill (ricer) and ended up with maybe a quarter raced and a quarter mashed and an interesting texture. I should have just used the food processor to make the purée. Or a larger die on the food mill. Tasted good though.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

Don't use a food processor to mash potatoes, you'll develop the gluten in them so much that it'll be like eating glue.

I retrograded the starch. I think my mistake was using the fine disk on my food mill straight out of the gate. It was clear that I could whip the crap out of the potatoes and they would not have gotten gluey. The final product was like a nice puree with some chunks, so it worked out.

Random Hero posted:

What torch did you use?

Bernz-o-Matic T8000. It was fun and worked really well (except for the smoke, but I can just take it outside next time. In order to keep my insufferable hipster foodie card I even bought into the Searzall hysteria on Kickstarter.

a foolish pianist posted:

Torches are nice, and they work really well.

EDIT: Also they are fun.

And this too. I probably need to get a new hood that can actually suck air and doesn't have a crappy microwave built in (I use the microwave daily, so maybe its not all bad). That or just use the torth outside.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


What's everyone favorite egg temperature? I know there are charts and stuff, but what do y'all actually like?

I would guess that something in the 62C realm is good for toast or bennedict but that like 64C might be awesome for other stuff. I had a smoked 64C yolk (no white) as the foundation of a dish once and it was custardy and awesome.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I did a pork tenderloin at 60.5 for dinner and it was really nice. I put a little maple, bourbon, mustard and seasonings with it (not too much, mind you) and it came out great and the bag liquid made an awesome sauce. Paired nicely with a spicy sweet potato hash.

I am actually more excited to take the maple pork and hash for breakfast tomorrow and add a 62.5 C egg (is really the only reason I made this for dinner tonight)

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Falcon2001 posted:

Just got my sansaire, first time messing around with sous vide and my fiancee is all freaked out about it. She's a protein specialist and grows bacteria for a living, so I guess I'm just going to dig into the science of it and just prove it's safe that way.

In the meantime, any vegetables that would be good for preparing sous-vide?

Perfect glazed carrots. Retrograde starch potatoes (just don't screw them up like I did). Maybe eggs as a gateway to non-veg options.

There is an iPhone app and a Polyscience reskin of it that can actually calculate both surface and core pasteurization. If she is worried about bacteria that app might help you show that you are being safe. I did my pork tenderloin to core pasteurization just to be safe. Only took two hours.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Falcon2001 posted:

Well, not that we could bring home, and I assume her boss would probably not be super psyched about her dropping a steak sample into the laboratory equipment. I'm mostly just going to figure out the pastuerization levels.


Perfect, forgot I have an iPad kicking around here.

I have the Polyscience version of the app but I think the generic one is the exact same thing and is cheaper. It actually lists pathogen reduction in the cook cycle. Assuming you measure your meat (heh) accurately enough you should be fine.

My Dad wanted to get a puddle machine and I told him that until he understood 5 or 6 log reduction of e.coli, listeria, and salmonella that he wasn't allowed to buy or use one and I would not eat anything he made since he would be at risk of killing himself or others. That scared him off, at least for now.

If your fiancée brought her boss a Perfectly cooked steak maybe he would look the other way just once?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


No Wave posted:

What. You just look at a table and do what it says.

Yeah you don't know my Dad. He would create colonies of death instead of precisely cooked protein.

In other news my 64C eggs came out more like 68C, I think because I didn't cool them before the post puddle dunk in boiling water to firm up the white. Still delicious and the best white I've ever had. Just need to figure out how to get a more runny yolk.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


SlayVus posted:

Maybe someone has done this or can do this, but I have a question.

Would/could/have you use(d) a stand alone water pump with the anova or sansaire to increase the water circulation when cooking large batches of food to lower temperature differentials in the water?

I have read that you can use a tube from the output port to have the water exit the opposite end of the puddle for better circulation. The Sansaire has a surprisingly strong pump, so I can't imagine it would help. There is some serious flow, more than enough to circulate completely in my Cambro.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I have a Cambro and dremelled a sansaire shaped hole in the lid. Works just fine. I am 36 hours into 72 hour short rib land.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


No Wave posted:

These are second only to the beef cheeks


I am following the modernist cuisine recipe. Should be really good. Someone at my butcher joked that they didn't know they carried Kobe beef ribs. They were that marbled and delicious looking. They even double bagged them with a little stock for me.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


geetee posted:

My guess would be for better circulation.

Yes, this. It works.

Random Hero posted:

Can you post another picture or two of your cambro setup?

Sure:

Towel to prevent last little space around cutout. Cutting board to help insulate stone counter top.
Ribs stacked Lincoln logs style to make sure to get flow throughout container. I had to tie up the bags though,mad the butcher used large bags that impeded water flow.

The grate does enough to get flow all around and I'm not worried about the part of bags that touches the side wall.
These are 48 hours in and bags look to have lots of liquid to help make sauce.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I also have a rolling cart I use for my chamber sealer and it can hold the Cambro and other stuff when not in use. Helps solve the spousal issue of wanting to not have equipment out all the time.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Just took out my 72 hour ribs and chilled them in a sink full of ice water. There was a little gassing but nothing concerning but the outside of the meat had a greenish-grayish-brownish tinge. No funny smell, just intense beefy-ness. Two of the bags had liquid the other two had the liquid turn into jelly instead. Trimmed and blocked the meat and re sealed. Juices in a container ready to reduce into sauce. Kept the bones to blanch them or dry them or whatever for service in a ridiculous manner like MC showed.

I hope I don't kill everyone.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Safety Dance posted:

Same thing happened to me. You didn't happen to sear them beforehand, did you?

I did not sear them before. I will reheat at 60 again and torch before glazing.

It's just weird the color they turned.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


My whole meal this evening was puddled. 72 hour short ribs, straight from Modernist Cuisine including sauce and toppings (minor herbal modification due to allergy requirements). Glazed carrots and radishes, straight from a local farm this morning. Celery root and potato purée that ended up being more mashy in terms of texture but it was fantastic. For the mash I did the potato first to retrograde it then chilled, then back in with celery root slices, cream, butter, and lemon zest. The lemony purée was great with the short ribs, thanks whoever suggested that here.



Totally incredible. I thought MC was crazy with the microwaving and frying tediously separated strands of flank steak but the crunchy beef with fried shallots and herbs was great with the beef.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


I went for the Searzall on Kickstarter and got the recommended Bernz-O-Matic torch to go with it. The torch is awesome (can be seen in use in a previous post on mine in this thread I think), and short of buying a restaurant grade salamander (shut up I want one my oven broiler sucks) this will be as good as I can get.

What I will probably do in ideal weather will be to puddle meat and then put it on the IR burners on my outside grill and torch from the top. Should get nice crust in seconds that way.

Leftover 72 hour short ribs with modernist Mac and Cheese is freaking incredible. I swear I gained five pounds last weekend.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Full Circle posted:

Anyone with a Sansaire mind telling me how loud theirs is? All the reviews I hear make it sound as if they can barely hear the thing from a few feet away. Mine makes a very noticeable whirring noise that dips in volume every 3 seconds or so, and can be easily heard from 20+ feet away. Is this to be expected?

Mine had two noises. The first was the regular hum of the motor. Not silent but I could live with it. Then the louder whirring rattle noise that I could hear three rooms away. I had a lengthy email exchange with the sansaire team and they said to take off the cover and look at where the propeller shaft came into the bottom section. Indeed it was pressed up against the plastic and was making the louder noise. They advised that I pull on the shaft to get it away from the plastic. The fix seemed to work but I am not totally happy with the extra vibration from the best shaft just to keep it from making the other noise.

So at least look at the shaft and see if it contacts the plastic hole where it comes down from the top. If it's another noise email them and get a replacement.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Random Hero posted:

So I got a Cambro with a lid for my Anova and I'm looking for some advice on cutting a lid in the top and adjusting the side to fit the screw a little better. I think someone previously recommended a nibbler, but I am looking for the cheapest and easiest way to do this with something I can pick up from Home Depot or Lowes. Any suggestions?

I used a dremel with some kind of abrasive cutting blade. Worked great. Used a sanding tip to get rid of sharp edges and I am happy with the results.

In other news my sansaire noise was not really fixed by pulling the shaft so they are sending me a replacement.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


BraveUlysses posted:

The dremel flex head add on would make it even easier to do

I have a pretty big cordless dremel and even that was totally simple. One of the disks more melted than cut the plastic, but it worked fine. Do it outside though, there will little tiny bits of plastic dust flying everywhere. Would have been a huge mess inside. I probably should have worn a mask, too.

I actually want a larger container and a second Sansaire.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


ScienceAndMusic posted:

My father has a heart issue so he can't really have beef or anything that is too fatty. He has to stick to lean meats. I really want to cook him something using Sous-Vide so I was wondering if anyone had any killer dish suggestions for a meat that isn't bad for his poor heart?

Fish, Chicken, Turkey, Lean Pork, its all good. What is his favorite meat that he can eat?

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Ola posted:

I can't say I've researched it, but so far so good. Have hardly ever used anything else, have not died. It could be that the higher temp of 83C is what causes some volatiles from the carrots to pass through while all the beef juices stay in at 58C. You would need go well above boiling temp to do any actual damage to the plastic.

When I did 72 hour short ribs they were double bagged in commercial style bags (by my butcher) and I could still smell the beef in the water and through the cambro even.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Safety Dance posted:

Restaurants already have a million kicking around so they puddle in 'em, people who don't think critically see that, and then they buy cambros too.

It helps when your parents own a bakery. The Sansaire guys are apparently thinking about this, but Scott wouldn't give up the details in my email exchange with him in the topic.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Choadmaster posted:

Amazon delivered mine today as expected.

It does look nicer than a cooler on the counter. But I chose it over a cooler specifically because it is transparent. I like to be able to quickly see if multiple items got circulated into a cluster, or if something is starting to float or whatever.

Edit: I remember someone asked earlier about cutting a hole in the lid. Don't know if it was answered, but I just used a hole saw on a drill for the circular portion, and a hacksaw for the straight bits. Easy.



That is a nice hole. I did mine on the short side, interesting you did the long side.

For those of you who cut a hole, use the above advice and use a hole saw and not a freaking dremel. The dremel worked but the hole is ugly. That hole saw hole looks rad.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


nwin posted:

So if I'm doing something that I would cook at 183-190, but won't get home until later so I want to chill them under 40, is the machine going to be capable of keeping items out of the danger zone?

I'd imagine there has to be a limit to the amount of food you can put in to the machine so there's enough water circulating to allow adequate cooling times.

In that case wouldn't you keep it cold at the start and tell it what time you want it done so that it can cook at the end of the time rather than the beginning?

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Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Doh004 posted:

I bought 3 short ribs and am gonna attempt the 48 hour short rib tomorrow night.

Good luck with this. Just remember that it takes two days and so you want to start making them two nights before you want to eat them. Not that I know anyone who has done that or anything, just saying (I was so stupid).

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