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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Fuzzy Pipe Wrench posted:

Flank/australian flank/skirt/fajita steak is a spectacularly cheap cut to puddle cook for 24-48. Also if you're using grass fed beef I usually suggest aiming for the shorter end of time ranges.
Is it? Skirt's pretty expensive these days, and there's not a whole lot of reason to vizzle it when a Jaccard tenderizer will make it quite tender on its own.

The cheapest meat that I've vizzled into steak-a-bility is Chuck steak, no contest.

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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


mod sassinator posted:

Good points, I think I'll try 130 for 4 hours since there is a lot of fat in these steaks.
134 is perfect for me... Ribeye is way better a little warmer because the fat gets gooey.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Nicol Bolas posted:

Anyone have thoughts on the Aqua Chef? (This sous vide system device thing.)

Based on this thread I believe it might be worth returning and getting an Anova instead, but I'm curious if anyone has any experience with the device. It's probably going to cost a lot to send back & get a vacuum sealer separately (or just use ziplocks) but the thing takes up a LOT of space and some stuff looks a bit sketchy on the parent company end of things. Can anyone speak to it? Is the Anova worth the pain of returning & ziplocking?

EDIT: I'm thinking yes but I hate to return an xmas present without a really good reason and I would like the internet to validate my feelings, please.
Return it. Get the Anova. If I had an AquaChef and I had to pay $120 to turn it into an Anova I would. This is because I know that the Anova works. Don't buy products that have not been highly rated, it is a huge waste of time and money.

Every time you look at your AquaChef you will probably wish that you'd exchanged it for an Anova (or a similarly highly-rated device). This will last for years until you finally want to get rid of it and at that point it won't be worth anything...

No Wave fucked around with this message at Dec 29, 2013 around 16:29

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Anyone have any favorite offal they like sous-vide? I'm on a kick. Have had some 145 degree calf liver (good), 140 for 11 hours lamb kidney (better!). Sweetbreads are the next obvious choice, I guess... any others?

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

Make trotter gear sous-vide.

Heart is also very, very good sous-vide.
Heart sounds good... temp recs?


For trotter gear if I do it I'll probably just use this recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...xcerpt_readmore

Although, looking at it, seems like there isn't much reason not to just pressure-cook instead, as a.) you'll keep the benefits of not emitting any steam during cooking and b.) you're heating the trotter past 160, making any benefits of a lower temp irrelevant.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2014 around 02:57

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


dotster posted:

I have been using clarified butter and EVOO mixed about 50/50 together with good results on the sear and great flavor.
There's no reason to do this. The smoke point of the olive oil doesn't change.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


EAT THE EGGS RICOLA posted:

sure, but why bother? just spend 60 seconds with a double boiler.
Or microwave

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Hed posted:

Ok, I used to use grapeseed oil so I could just do stupid high heat but I find that I don't get that ~nice brown sear~ as much. Even if it's due to dirty burnt milk solids I think it made a more appealing-looking product. Any ideas for how to get this with oil?


I cook at 140 for 4 hours. Same for 15-30 secs a side I guess. I haven't tried an ice bath prior.
The cooler they are, the longer you can sear them...

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Ultimate Mango posted:

So go from puddle to ice bath in the bag, chill for a bit and then sear in rocket hot pan for as short as possible to get crust?
Usually I pull from the puddler, put in the fridge, finish whatever else needs to be finished (10 to 20 minutes or so) and then drain, towel, and sear medium-hot. Total estimate but the meat's usually at about a hundred degrees when I do the sear.

If you have a thermapeen you can sort of figure out what works for you. If you're unsatisfied with sear the other thing to check is how dry the meat is.

More oil = better sear because more of the meat will be getting heated (especially on something ultra-lean like a cooked chicken breast), rocket heat not necessary (400 degrees is plenty)

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 14, 2014 around 02:23

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


I'd hit them with the jaccard then vizzle a little lower. (the tougher lean meat solution)

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Ultimate Mango posted:

I retrograded the starch. I think my mistake was using the fine disk on my food mill straight out of the gate. It was clear that I could whip the crap out of the potatoes and they would not have gotten gluey. The final product was like a nice puree with some chunks, so it worked out.
Don't use the fine disk for potato puree - once through the big holes is all you need.

"Nice puree with some chunks" is not a puree - the idea of a puree is generally to serve as a condiment for other items on the plate.


I prefer using a potato ricer, but that's because I find food mills really awkward.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


SlayVus posted:

So I was doing some reading about Sous Vide for when I eventually get an Anova and I came across something a little disturbing about the use of plastics for sous vide.

I came across these two articles
http://www.chow.com/food-news/10789...sticis-it-safe/
http://nomnompaleo.com/post/1246320...-plastic-safety

Basically, it boils down to this. Unless you're using FoodSaver bags, silicone bags, the SousVide Supreme bags, or other EA/BPA free plastics; estrogen is leaching from the plastic into your food.

I don't think this has been discussed in this thread and I'm not sure how common knowledge it is even for the professionals.
Most of the bags you see these days are BPA-free. I know my VacMaster bags are. Ziploc bags appear to be as well. Still worth checking to make sure when you're making your purchase, though.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


SlayVus posted:

EA free is different from BPA. EA releases estrogen.
Ah werd.

Most SV bags including my VacMasters are made out of polyethylene and nylon (like the foodsaver and SVS are). You can find stuff online that says that even polyethylene has EA but it's fringe-y enough for now that I'm willing to keep using my puddler.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


On the blog ms. caveman effectively concludes that there isn't a problem with most conventional sous-vide bags anyways (as most are made from polyethylene and nylon anyways, just like the FoodSaver bags she approves of).

However, it's totally possible that even polyethylene is a truly bad thing, I don't know. I'm not gonna force it on someone who really doesn't like the idea, and if there were EA-free bags I'd maybe switch to use those instead. But there aren't right now.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 21, 2014 around 18:01

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Ultimate Mango posted:

My Dad wanted to get a puddle machine and I told him that until he understood 5 or 6 log reduction of e.coli, listeria, and salmonella that he wasn't allowed to buy or use one and I would not eat anything he made since he would be at risk of killing himself or others. That scared him off, at least for now.
What. You just look at a table and do what it says.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Falcon2001 posted:

Success! Managed to cook a new york strip steak and make a pan sauce out of the bag juice (least appealing title for anything ever, but c'est la vie) and it all turned out pretty drat great. The steak needed to be seared longer or hotter, and the pan sauce was kind of weird but that was the fault of the dessert red we used for it.

What oils do you folks use for searing?
Sous vide bag goop gets weird and lumpy when it's heated past 180 or so (which you will want to do to reduce it). The only solution I've found is to run it through a fine mesh strainer after bringing it to a boil.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


ShadowCatboy posted:

I was preparing some sous vide onions for french onion soup, but unfortunately I used yellow onions instead, and cut across the equator instead of pole to pole and now I've got onion mush.

I'll get some proper red onions and save the yellow onion mush for a stock or jam or something.
Onion mush is the basic intended effect, I think...

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


deimos posted:

Pretty sure SubG is saying you two are not doing it right, if the ribeye is normal american thickness (euros tend to do thinner steaks) of 1-1.5" you are not pasteurising your food and might as well not loving cook it.
Isn't that a little dramatic? My understanding was that most of the badness on meat is on the outside, which will be taken care of by the sear.

I understand wanting to pasteurize for serving other people etc. For myself I've been eating a lot of rare to bleu meat recently (not ribeye tho)

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 28, 2014 around 15:08

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


deimos posted:

How is it being dramatic? Don't SV it, sear it and eat it.
The texture of meat at 131 is different from the texture raw... the point of SV in this case is to get precisely that temp. You could definitely argue that with a thermapen, flipping the steak a lot, and a little practice you should be able to hit that temp consistently from raw, but then again I just hosed up a lot of really expensive steak a few weeks ago because I'm an idiot.

SV is especially nice for bone-in ribeyes and getting dat deckle to the same temp as the parts near the bone...

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 28, 2014 around 15:23

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


a foolish pianist posted:

131 is more medium rare than blue.
Yeah the blue bit was a poorly phrased addendum on my part about not caring about eating raw-ish meat.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


SlayVus posted:

Bacteria don't just live on the outside, they live on the inside of the meat. When spoiling bacteria become active, it doesn't matter whether you're meat is cooked or no it has already started to spoil.

You're not just cooking the outside of the meat when you stick in the water bath for 5-6 hours. You're pasteurizing the WHOLE product.
I know that - but saying that there's no purpose in puddling something at 131 for an hour is still, I think, not the case, as you're still cooking the meat in a manner that has potential benefits (texture/taste, not health) over just searing it.

Like, it's 5:30 PM and you have some steak you want to eat. Starting pasteurization at 2:00 PM might have been the better option, but puddling's still a viable option for eating.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


a foolish pianist posted:

Stop listening to these crazy people - there's no need to let a steak sit at 132 for six hours to pasteurize. It does nothing. It's not better. Actually, if you're cooking at below 130, it's probably worse - those are the temps at which some bacteria grow faster. And it's not like non-sous vide methods of steak cooking would pasteurize in a way that sous vide doesn't. If you're getting the core of your steak to 132 degrees on a grill, you're not letting it sit at 132 for six hours.
That's sort of what I was getting at - though I can imagine pasteurizing somewhat reducing risk in some cases. Because I'm still fairly young and healthy I actually seek out raw meat and subscribe to the opinion that exposing yourself to safe bacteria strengthens your immune system in the long run, but that's not really a debate for this thread.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Feb 28, 2014 around 17:05

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


dotster posted:

Can we at least talk about why ribeye is the best cut of steak?
Honestly? I only really prefer ribeye when it's dry-aged, in which case it obviously is the best steak. Otherwise I'm happy with a strip steak.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


dotster posted:

I am kind of spoiled, my family raises cattle and I get loads of grass fed dry-aged beef. Hell the hamburger I get is aged more than most store bought steaks.

But yes, for me a good bone-in ribeye is my favorite steak. My second choice is generally a black and blue strip steak.
I don't think you can even get grass-fed dry-aged beef in Boston. Drives me nuts.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Foxrunsecurity posted:

There's M.F. Dulock in Somerville or you can hold your nose and go to whole foods.
THANK you! I used google a lot and couldn't find a place like this.

Most of the Whole Foods dry-aged beef I've seen isn't grass-fed. I'm certainly not above eating it, I'm just on a grass-fed thing recently.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


powertoiletduck posted:

did you guys recommend a plastic container for the sous vide? Remember reading something here but can't see it going through the thread - clearly going blind.
I like this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Cambro-12189C...n/dp/B002NQB63E

I'm not as hardcore about thermal insulation as a lot of people here, though. Technically a cooler would be better but this is the setup I saw in restaurants. It keeps its heat better than you'd think, and much better than a pot does.

I'm a total dumbass so I just cut a hole in the matching lid with the dremel equivalent I had (breaking a few blades in the process, I'd never used one before).

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Chemmy posted:

I just leave the lid off, but I haven't vizzled for more than a few hours with my Sansaire.
I often leave it filled with water (but without the vizzler attached) and the lid has saved me from multiple instances of dropping poo poo into it.

The water does get gross, though, especially after longer cooks. Stuff does leech in and out of the bags (probably obvious to some, but not me) even if you double-bag (which I do for long cooks), which is why you need the container to be food-safe plastic.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Ultimate Mango posted:

I have a Cambro and dremelled a sansaire shaped hole in the lid. Works just fine. I am 36 hours into 72 hour short rib land.
These are second only to the beef cheeks

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Looks good - out of curiosity, what's the grate for on the bottom of your water?

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


cheezit posted:

Are there any recommendations for water heating elements? I just got a Dorkfood PID and was thinking, instead of using the crockpot I've been using. I've seen some builds with things like Norpro heating elements, pre-built PIDS and pumps to circulate water, which look kind of fun. Most of the immersion elements seem like they burn out pretty quickly, even the Norpro elements, some even after a few hours of prolonged use. I haven't seen any info in the thread relating to that, but I might have missed it.
Honestly, I'd return it and get one of the $200 puddlers instead. The DorkFood made more sense when the poly pro was the cheapest circulator out there.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


cheezit posted:

Right on. I guess I'll just keep with the crock pot for the time being and then possibly upgrade later. I think I was looking to make the DVS into a more permanent solution than it can be.
I thought you had the possibility of returning the DorkFood - if not, nm, someone else will have to chime in as have no experience in the matter.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2014 around 20:23

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


LTBS posted:

A local "Ethnic" grocery store near me has beef cheeks for an incredible price. What can I do with them SV?
Clean them (cut off the gross parts), season them, optionally sear them on one side, 72 hours at 144 degrees, done

They're by *far* the best thing I've made with a long Sous Vide cook time. Don't know why short ribs became "the thing" while these are around.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


LTBS posted:

Same preparation as short ribs as far as after vizzling? Season, sear, reduce bag juices into sauce and serve over something?
Basically yeah but all my vizzle sauces always suck (clumpy, weird). Vizzled 72 hour beef has so much flavor that it's best with something that creates a flavor contrast - so something acidic. A lemony celery root puree is my go-to.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


LTBS posted:

I do a lot of cauliflower purees so I was thinking of making one and squeezing out a good bit of the liquid and trying to fry it up like a piece of polenta.
Up to you - when I have fancy meat I like keeping the meat the firmest texture on the plate.

You'll like them no matter what, they're my favorite meat.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Dane posted:

Scott from Sansaire posted a comment that they recommended containers at least 9" tall because that way the unit would sit only on the edge of the container and not on the bottom. The tallest cambro I've been able to find is "only" 8 inches. Anyone seen taller/deeper?
This is the one most people use for vizzling: http://www.amazon.com/Cambro-12189C...keywords=cambro

(9 inches on the dot, which would normally make me want more leeway, but Sansaire was most likely designed to operate with this given its popularity)

No Wave fucked around with this message at Mar 6, 2014 around 23:07

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


But... the Anova used to cost $300!!!

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


I should start going around and making fun of restaurants that have salamanders. Don't they know they can just use a cast-iron??

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Using a pan is still going to be my mainstay, but the Searzall has potential for touch-ups, gentler proteins (seafood, foie gras), etc, as it gets the outside hotter while delivering less overall heat (and it allows for more efficient evaporation of moisture as it heats the up-facing side). It doesn't strictly dominate pan/broiler given that a pan still delivers more heat, but it's a useful tool for any SV setup.

The extreme reaction is because a lot of experienced posters who know better have claimed that it has no point - you got hit by some backlash, sorry, didn't know it was an honest question

No Wave fucked around with this message at Mar 11, 2014 around 20:35

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


ScienceAndMusic posted:

So the basic answer is, it is probably better, but a pan will do just fine?
Use a pan with no hesitation. Searzall has uses, heck some might prefer it after it comes out, but pan will continue to be the bread and butter of SV searing for most/many people.

I've never actually used it (few people have), so there's still not much known about its actual performance in a home kitchen. Seems fun tho and the videos look nice.

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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


nwin posted:

I had thought about doing this before...but somewhere I thought I had read you should always heat the pan first, then oil...but I don't think this would make any loving difference.

edit: Serious Eats to the rescue.
I always pre-heat my pan initially to get rid of any moisture - I don't inspect my pans very closely and sometimes there's a few drops of water that spit at me if I don't (THIS IS SUPER MINOR, IT IS JUST WHAT I DO). If I'm searing, I add oil after a bit and wait so that the oil will come to temp.

Also lol that pan they're using to sear the ribeye (ok article tho)

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