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Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Perfect timing since my Nomiku should finally arrive this week. For the first couple things I'll probably just clip it to a big pot but eventually I'll need to get one o' them containers. Should I care about the container or will any big plastic bin that's safe at 80C or so be fine?

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Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I'm trying the 72 hour short rib recipe, seared on all sides and double-bagged in the food saver. I started it last night and when I woke up, there was a distinct smell of cooking beef in the house. The bags look sealed - no ballooning visible - but it seems weird that I can smell anything at all through two Food Saver bags. Is that normal or should I be concerned? It's a pleasant smell but it doesn't seem like it should be there at all.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Thanks. That makes me feel better.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Food safety folks will tell you to thaw in the fridge, not on the countertop. You want to mimimize the time the food spends in the danger zone where bad stuff grows. I don't have the names memorized and I imagine that someone who does is posting about them right now, but here's the dumbed down version: nasty microorganisms that grow in food sometimes have spores and/or toxic byproducts that aren't easily destroyed. If you go from "too cold for those little bastards" to "too hot for those little bastards" quickly enough, they never produce enough spores or toxins for it to matter and you're fine. Leave the food in the danger zone for long enough and becomes hopeless.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I haven't done 48 but I did 72 @ 62 C, seared, rubbed with garlic and pepper, and then double-bagged. I loved 'em. They were falling off the bone tender but not mush. They tasted amazing, like the best pot roast I ever imagined, but not dry the way pot roast gets. I just need to make sure to get less fatty short ribs next time.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Yeah, the grey layer near the outside ends up being just a couple millimeters thick after a good 30 second sear. That's part of the goal. I tried torch searing last night and it made an even smaller grey zone, though it was more time consuming than the pan method.

I only tried the torch because my wife complained that there was a flavor to the crust of a grilled steak that I wasn't getting via pan searing. A basic torch sear was only a hair better, according to her review. Personally I am a weirdo freak person who hates that taste and avoids grilled food whenever possible, so I'm a little fuzzy on the nuances here, but does the Goon gestalt think that more torching might get it closer, or is there a flavor profile unique to grilling a steak over coal?

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Related question - after I seared my steaks last night, I deglazed with a little red wine, then added butter, broth, and meat juices to try to make a pan sauce. When I deglazed, the fond was coming up in big flakes. I made some other mistakes in the ratios of what I added and came away with a pale sauce with big flakes of fond floating in it. Did I screw up when I used my metal spatula to scrub the fond off, or are there other factors that determine how it behaves?

Zorak of Michigan fucked around with this message at Jan 2, 2014 around 21:17

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I'll remember that, thanks. Usually the juices go in with packaged gravy mix for the mashed potatoes, but this time I was trying my hand at potatoes Lyonaisse, so I figured, why not add them to the pan sauce?

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

nwin posted:

So those short ribs I did for 72 hours at 129? I took em out today and threw em in an ice water bath because I plan on heating/searing tomorrow for dinner.

I double vacuum sealed them (bag in a bag) and it looks like the inner bag has some gasses or something in it because it was causing the bag to float (I had to put a plate on it yesterday when I noticed to keep it weighed down).

When I took it out of the water bath, I noticed some kind of smell coming from the bag. I thought I had read that this is normal, but I wanted to make sure.

The first time I did these ribs I must have gotten a better seal because I didn't have any of these issues.

When I made 72 hour short ribs I was surprised by the cooking beef smell that came from the double-bagged ribs. If it's a good smell, don't worry about it. If it's a bad smell, you've got problems.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

If I pasteurize avocado, can I refrigerate them after and use them the next day? I have a vague fear that heating them will accelerate the ripening/rotting process and I'll have a mess on my hands.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

No Wave posted:

I thought the point of heating them was to stop that process from happening. If that is not the case - why are you pasteurizing your avocados?

It stops or at least slows down the browning that happens when you expose them to air. I thought that was a different process than ripening. My knowledge of the chemistry of this stuff is pretty much limited to what I've read in GWS.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Zorak of Michigan posted:

If I pasteurize avocado, can I refrigerate them after and use them the next day? I have a vague fear that heating them will accelerate the ripening/rotting process and I'll have a mess on my hands.

Turns out it's totally fine. About 3 hours at 44C and my guacamole didn't even start to turn brown for about six hours after I set it out.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

The notion is that it slows down the browning/oxidization process. I haven't run comparison timings but I know that the last time I used this trick, I wasn't the only one who brought some guacamole to the party, and the other person's guac turned more considerably more rapidly. I know the browning is harmless but it's not appetizing.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

http://www.seafoodwatch.org/seafood...roups/swordfish

It doesn't cover mercury (I assume people with mercury-related risks ought to avoid it, but it's OK for the rest of us in moderation) but it shows several well-managed fisheries.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Water has 4x the specific heat of air by weight. It's about 800 times denser too. My money's on the steak in water hitting (close to) 140 first.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Also having a Searzall is fun.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I pre-sear and go directly from bag to platter.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

5436 posted:

What is better for searing, All-Clad 12" Fry Pan or Cast Iron?

My qualifications are weak but after using my All-Clad for searing for years, I tried my cast iron and was amazed at how much better the crust on steak turned out.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I do about 70hrs at 144 degrees, pre-seared and then rubbed with pepper and minced garlic. Someone here mentioned that starting with 30 minutes at 180 degrees would help keep the cook safe, so lately my go-to move has been to start with some of the Serious Eats sous vide carrots, which work pretty nicely at that temperature, and then drop the ribs in the puddle when I have them all seared, rubbed, and bagged.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

a foolish pianist posted:

Is there any reason 144 wouldn't be safe?

Not that I know of, but I don't want to take chances with 72-hour short ribs. I usually make them for company and I don't want to have to cancel plans, or toss bags and serve scanty portions.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Big City Drinkin posted:

I don't know, actually. The label doesn't clearly indicate. It says it's "enriched" and "expeller pressed" if that's relevant. Its color was much lighter than EVOO - almost looked like water in the pan.

Given what you report, I'd go with "not refined." Look for bottles that explicitly say refined or high heat.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

This summer I'm going to try putting my cast iron skillet on a tabletop induction hob, which will be on a table on my crappy deck. I'm not sure it will get as hot as I'd like, but it will keep the smoke out of the house. I hope.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Note to self: to ensure truth in advertising, store my Nomiku on the shelf under the Dyson V6.

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

I'm thinking of making a big mess of 72 hour short ribs for a party, more than I can cook at once. My draft plan is to cook in two batches, serve the second, and use the puddle to reheat the first batch. Am I missing a risk? Is there a better way to do it?

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Ultimate Mango posted:

Cook and cool both of them in advance. Puddle or oven to reheat, depending on how you were doing them. Less timing to worry about with finishing one batch at the time another needs to be reheated.

Edit: I have also reheated mass quantities, even from frozen, in a big turkey fryer pot and outdoor burner. Left the meat in the bags, big honking pot of water, and came out great. I think the most Iíve done this way is maybe 40-50#, so enough for a good sized party.

Thanks! My thought is that for 72 hour short ribs, it's kind of irrelevant if they turn into 70 hour or 74 hour ribs, so I already don't need to worry about the timing too much. If I was making something that cooked in a couple hours, that would be different. Am I overlooking something?

Anyone have a formula for reheating time in a hot water bath?

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Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

How long did the first set last you? I'm on my second set, but I've been using the mine for years now. The consumable cost doesn't really bother me.

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