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Mortabis
Jul 8, 2010


How much of a premium do you have to pay to get a 1911 with fully left-handed/ambidextrous controls?

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thermobollocks
Jul 5, 2009

GET A DILLON

Mortabis posted:

How much of a premium do you have to pay to get a 1911 with fully left-handed/ambidextrous controls?

Ambi poo poo's all over the place and mag releases are easily reversible. Slide stops on the other hand...

Doctor Grape Ape
Aug 26, 2005

Dammit Doc, I just bought this for you 3 months ago. Try and keep it around for a bit longer this time.



Are these the guns that the internet loves to say were made out of old railroad tracks and are therefore superior in strength?

Basticle
Sep 12, 2011



AceOverdose posted:

If you enjoy the P239 your should try out the P938. It is really nice and comes in many flavors. The breakdown is simple too, stays basic 1911 until you get to the trigger.

http://www.sigsauer.com/CatalogProd...stols-p938.aspx

I'm not sure if he meant 239 or 238. You're thinking of the 238 which is the .380 version of the 938. The 239 is a completely different design.

AceOverdose
Oct 22, 2013


Basticle posted:

I'm not sure if he meant 239 or 238. You're thinking of the 238 which is the .380 version of the 938. The 239 is a completely different design.

Nice catch. I wasn't thinking, the 239 isn't really a 1911 like the 238. That was my mistake.

Bud
Oct 5, 2002

Quite Polite Like Walter Cronkite

Posting some page two pictures:
My Kimber SIS that has moved onto greener pastures.

In the brief time I had it, it ran very well and was really fun at the range.

My DW Valor - I need to take some nicer shots of this!

SadWhaleFamily
May 1, 2007



Bud posted:

My DW Valor - I need to take some nicer shots of this!


I felt like the Valor took nice shots for me. It just made bullets stack on top of each other.

And it grated my palm skin off with its awesomely aggressive checkering. I liked your gun a lot.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Doctor Grape Ape posted:

Are these the guns that the internet loves to say were made out of old railroad tracks and are therefore superior in strength?

Not railroad tracks but the metallurgy is definitely hard as heck. Wore out the file when i fixed up the serrations, both smiths I had taking a lathe to it commented on what a bastard it was. Seen a swedish 1911 smith say add an extra fee for working on norincos due to tool wear.

Steak Flavored Gum
Apr 26, 2007

ABANDONED HOMEWORLD FOR SALE, CHEAP!!!
Custom desert-marsh conversion in galactic core, 12% oxygen atm., great weather, friendly native life (missing one moon). Great fix-er-upper. Must sell, alien invasion imminent. $3995 or best offer.

Oh hey, Dan Wesson.

SadWhaleFamily
May 1, 2007



Steak Flavored Gum posted:

Oh hey, Dan Wesson.



I am a little disappointed that watch isn't set to 10 o'clock.

Bubakles
Jul 24, 2007
Po babitos una te babito kokeros

Cross-postin' from my box thread
My two Norwegian 1914s, made in the Kongsberg factory on license from Colt. Top one made 1928, bottom in 1945 under German occupation.

tonedef131
Sep 3, 2003



I posted about this a couple times in the last thread, but since we have a new thread I thought I would give a little more detail on the pistols I make. I am the production manager for Schroeder-Bauman and I have assembled and tested every single gun we have made so far. We come from a background of welding and machining parts mainly for the aerospace, defense and bio-medical industries, so people are often interested in the way we have approached handgun manufacturing. Sorry that it sounds a bit like a puff piece, I wrote it for our distributor to use in sales material.

We start by making our frame and slide from aircraft grade stainless steel bar stock, which has yield strength in excess of 170 KSI and a tensile strength of 200 KSI. Most importantly the toughness (a measure of a materials resistance to crack formation) of this particular stainless steel alloy is considerably better than other industry standard materials. We have found this to be the most durable, corrosion resistant and precise stainless steel for handgun manufacturing.

Starting from billet complicates the machining process and increases manufacturing costs. However, we believe it results in the best possible product, and are therefore unwilling to compromise. Due to this stubbornness you will find our processes to be significantly different from other manufacturers who prefer to take shortcuts using MIM parts, castings or occasionally even plastic in place of billet.

When our bar stock arrives it is cut into 10.5” lengths, each of which will result in 2 frames. Our slides must be made individually, so these are cut to 7.75” before being milled perfectly to size.



Several operations take place on each frame and slide inside our CNC mills, wire EDM and sinker EDM.




Between each step, time is taken to assure all tolerances are being held and parts are within spec.



Knowing that a gun is only as strong as its weakest component, we give every single component the same amount of attention to detail. The hammer and the sear begin as billet stainless tool steel, which are then milled, heat treated and ground before being wire EDMed. This gives them incredible strength and a very unique aesthetic. To be sure each gun has perfect fit, we then hand fit and hone the two individually to ensure crisp, sharp 4-4.5lb trigger pull.



Our refusal to use cast components has many times required us to rethink the way certain 1911 components are made. For example, our mainspring housings are electron beam welded onto a stainless steel shaft, allowing us to machine them in the 4th axis. Both our thumb safety and slide stops use pins which are lathe turned in house, then pressed together with weldments that we have machined from solid billet. These two parts are then electron beam welded together creating a truly unique and robust product.





Once all components have been machined, tumbled, heat treated and bead blasted we pair them with your requested slide/frame combination. We are proud to feature Storm Lake barrels, Novak adjustable dovetail mount sights and Nowlin match light triggers with adjustable take-up.



To start, the slide and the frame are hand lapped together for the tightest tolerance possible. This technique aids in accuracy and reduces recoil when shooting. In order to decrease the coefficient of friction due to such a close fit, both the slide and frame rails are ceramic coated using Cerakote Microslick™. This both increases lubricity and decreases wear, resulting in a very smooth slide action.




Having always been displeased with the plunger tube fit-up on 1911s, we decided an overkill solution was in order. Each plunger tube is swaged in place, pressed flush and then microscopically Nd:YAG laser welded to the frame. This allows us to have a plunger tube that will last the lifetime of the gun with no risk of it falling off or getting deformed from crimping.



At this point each component is hand fitted, assembled with Kellube M12™ and checked for proper function. Our testing is done in two stages, first live rounds are shot by hand to test for correct feel and to test recoil. Second, we fire each gun from a ransom rest in order to align sights and check for close groupings.



After testing is complete, the gun is fully disassembled and each component inspected. Once inspection is complete the pistol is reassembled, lubricated and packaged for shipping to its new home.



In order to prove to you that our pistols are as robust as we say they are, we offer a lifetime guarantee on every gun we sell. Our current production models are Government and Commander size in stainless and well as Commander and Officer in aluminum. Our anodized aluminum line uses all the same components as the steel models but the frame and mainspring housing are machined out of billet aluminum and feature a rounded tail.

TheFreshmanWIT
Feb 17, 2012


tonedef131 posted:

I posted about this a couple times in the last thread, but since we have a new thread I thought I would give a little more detail on the pistols I make. I am the production manager for Schroeder-Bauman and I have assembled and tested every single gun we have made so far. We come from a background of welding and machining parts mainly for the aerospace, defense and bio-medical industries, so people are often interested in the way we have approached handgun manufacturing. Sorry that it sounds a bit like a puff piece, I wrote it for our distributor to use in sales material.

This is awesome! I remember your posts from the v1 thread and was wondering what happened to you! I'll note that your website doesn't seem to have the aluminum/officer options in the pistol builder.

I would love to see some sort of video of one of the pistols being made, but I'm a sucker for CNC/gunsmith porn.

tonedef131
Sep 3, 2003



TheFreshmanWIT posted:

This is awesome! I remember your posts from the v1 thread and was wondering what happened to you! I'll note that your website doesn't seem to have the aluminum/officer options in the pistol builder.

I would love to see some sort of video of one of the pistols being made, but I'm a sucker for CNC/gunsmith porn.
It's been a busy year, they've been in development for a few years but we've only been making pistols exclusively since Jan 1st. I don't have any videos now, but it's something I'd like to do eventually. The aluminum models are very new and have been selling faster than we've been able to make them. I'm putting some together this week for a photoshoot that hopefully we can do this Friday. There are more photos of them on our Facebook page, but they won't be added to the website for a couple more weeks.

Doctor Grape Ape
Aug 26, 2005

Dammit Doc, I just bought this for you 3 months ago. Try and keep it around for a bit longer this time.


I just played around with the "build a pistol" thing, tell me more about those sexy rear end carbon fiber grips. Are those made in house?

tonedef131
Sep 3, 2003



Doctor Grape Ape posted:

I just played around with the "build a pistol" thing, tell me more about those sexy rear end carbon fiber grips. Are those made in house?
They are made by Carbon Creations, we've been playing around with making our own aluminum grips but so far haven't really been happy with any of the results. I finally got around to building myself a gun and put a pair of those on, then shot a couple hundred rounds and they are actually pretty comfortable. This is what mine looks like dressed in those and Novak night sights. We've never bobbed the tail on our steel guns but I'm thinking about doing it to mine. Last time we made aluminum mainspring housings I adjusted the feeds and speeds and ran a few steel ones just incase I ever wanted to play around.

beetle
Oct 12, 2012

Wie ein Chef!


So you want to buy a WW2 M1911A1? Great, so does pretty much every other collector out there. The popularity of WW2 collectibles has surged with the release of movies and TV shows such as "Band of Brothers". Here is a simple guide to get you started on finding a WW2 M1911A1 and hopefully not get burned in the process.

Before we go any further, you need to know what a *correct* WW2 era M1911A1 looks like. Here are a few to get you started.

Colt M1911A1


Ithaca M1911A1


Remington Rand M1911A1


Pay attention to the similarities and especially following areas which are the first to get messed with by bubba:

1) Sights. The front sight should be tiny by today's standards and have a half-moon shape but ramped towards the rear. The rear sight is also tiny.
2) Front strap -- should be smooth, no checkering/stippling/etc.
3) Trigger -- short trigger, usually made from stamped steel.
4) Finish -- notice that the small parts (hammer, trigger, slide stop, thumb safety) are usually darker in color than the frame and slide

Ok now that you have an idea of what a correct M1911A1 looks like, you need to think about how much you want to spend. These guns can go anywhere from $600 (mixmasters) to $100,000+ (unicorns). In general here are the major categories and their price ranges. (note the prices I quote are from my understanding of the collector market, what I see at auctions, and guns for sale in my area. Since I'm in California sometimes my baseline of prices tend to be a little higher than the rest of the country).

1) Mixmasters, bubba'd up guns. These are guns that are a mix of parts both vintage and modern, and would be impossible to bring back to original condition. Back in the 60s the Army sold off their stock of M1911A1s to the public for cheap. So a lot of these guns served as base guns for customization or people learning to gunsmith. $600-$800.


This gun is truly all mixed up. A Colt slide on a Remington Rand frame. Sights replaced (ugly too!). Trigger replaced. etc. A true shooter with no real collectible value.

2) Commercial restorations. These are guns that retain the original look of a WW2 M1911A1 but have been "restored" by somebody other than the government. Depending on the skill of the restorer it may be difficult to distinguish between a restored gun and an original gun. These guns typically look nice, and appeal to someone who wants a "ww2 gun". $900-$1100


3) Government Re-arsenals. After the war, the government refurbished a lot of guns and put them into storage. At the time they were getting refurbished, the government processed them in batches. Therefore, the guns got all mixed up when being rebuilt. So while they are "mixmasters" these guns were made this way by the government. This is considered a legitimate class by 1911 collectors. $1000-$1300


4) Correct M1911A1. These are guns in which all of the parts and finish match their as-issued condition. The overall condition of the gun will have a huge impact on the price. But for guns in high condition with original parts the range is around $1600 (Ithaca and Remington Rand) to $2700 (Colts).

A good correct Remington Rand with a little wear (this one sold for $1800)


My pretty much NIB Remington Rand (bought for $2000)


5) Rare and Unique Variations. Not all of the producers of M1911A1 made them in equal numbers. One of the more rare manufacturers was Union Switch and Signal (US&S). US&S only made about 55,000 guns while Remington Rand made about 800,000. Even among the major manufacturers there are some rare variations (for example Colt with "WB" marking instead of "GHD"). $3000+

A nice US&S pistol can go up to $5K


6) The Unicorns. Perhaps the most well known of the M1911A1 unicorns is a Singer. before WW2 started Singer (sewing machine company) got an order to study how to manufacture 1911s faster. They made exactly 500 pistols as a part of an "educational order". Today a Singer in good condition can bring $100,000 or more. In addition to Singers, some other Unicorns would be Colts with a "JSB" inspection mark, or guns associated with historical figures or Medal of Honor winners. I'd put my Remington Rand serial #1 in this category. As far as price goes, Sky's the limit.



Ok now that you know the major categories, let's dive deeper into finding a good gun in the category you want to buy in. For the purposes of this article I'm going to ignore category #1, the mixmasters. It's already a mixmaster, so if you like how it looks/feels then buy it. Let's move on to determining if the gun you are considering is original.

Before you buy guns, buy books! -- Collector's Motto
If you are going to invest in a nice WW2 M1911A1, I highly recommend you buy a book to confirm the pistol you are considering. Joe Poyer's "The Model 1911 and Model 1911A1 Military and Commerical Pistols" is an excellent beginner's book to determining originality. http://www.amazon.com/Model-1911A1-...s/dp/1882391462

Step One -- Does the Slide match the Frame?
Ok let's start with the basics. The first thing we should check is if the slide matches the frame. If not, then the gun is immediately in mixmaster category (except if it's an rearsenal which we will cover below).

Look for the final inspection mark located on the left slide of the frame near the back side of the trigger. In the picture below I am referring to the "FJA" marking.


The following table will list the inspector's mark and what company made the frame:

Colt: RS, WB, GHD (majority of WW2 colts), JSB
US&S: RCD
Ithaca: FJA
Remington Rand: FJA

Because Ithaca and Remington Rand used the same mark (FJA), you'll need to look at the serial number to determine if the frame is Ithaca or RR. Since Ithaca made less guns I'll list out the Itahca serial numbers. If your frame is not on the list below and has a FJA stamp, then you can assume it is a RR.

Ithaca Serial Numbers:
856405-916404
1208674-1235000
1235001-1279673
1441431-1471430
1816642-1845997
1845998-1890503
2075104-2110464
2110465-2134403
2619014-2660318


So using the information above we can see if the slide matches the frame. If for example the frame is marked "FJA" but the slide is Colt, then we know it does not match. Same would be true if the slide is a Remington Rand, but the frame is marked "GHD". etc.

Corollary to Step One - Is it a Government Re-Arsenal?
So let's say in Step one you've determined that the frame and slide don't match. that would normally put the gun into a "mixmaster" category. However, was the gun re-arsenaled by the government? Look for a stamp ending in "A" on the frame. For example:


Notice the "RIA" stamping underneath the serial number.


This one has "AA" by the slide stop post

If the gun has an "A" stamp, then the gun has been through a rebuild and most likely is a mixmaster. However, as I said before collectors consider this a legitimate niche, so you might want to still consider this gun if everything else looks ok.

AA - Augusta Arsenal
BA - Benicia Arsenal
RA - Raritan Arsenal
RIA - Rock Island Arsenal
SA - Springfield Armory
SAA - San Antonio Arsenal

Step Two - Are the parts in the right era?
If you've determined that the slide and frame match, take a look at the small parts. Do they look like they are of the right era? Go back to the pictures I posted at the top of the post -- do the sights, trigger, etc look right? For reference here is that mixmaster again



As you can see the small parts don't match what an original M1911A1 should look like.

Ok, if you've passed Steps One and Two, then it's time to get serious as we are getting into the high dollar mark. Presumably what you have in your hand looks to be original and correct. let's kick it up a notch and inspect the gun even further.

Step Three -- Has the gun been refinished?
Of all the steps this is the hardest. Unlike the other steps where there is something that will immediately signal "yes" or "no", determining original finish is more like putting all the clues together. There is no hard and fast rule of "if you see A then the gun has been refinished". You need to look at all the clues which will then help you make an educated guess on the gun.

What Color is the gun?
Early parkerized Colts (below serial #860,000) will have a dark grey look to them. However, as the other manufacturers started making guns the color shifted to have a green hue to it.

Most Remington Rand and Ithacas will have a green hue to it, except very late Rands (above serial #2,000,000 which will have a light grey color.

All US&S guns will be dark grey/back in color.

All Singers will appear to be blued, a dark black.


Some of my WW2 M1911A1s. From left to right, an early Colt, Mid-War Colt, US&S, Remington Rand, and Ithaca.

Notice the darker grey of the early colt (gun #1). However, Guns 2, 4, 5 (mid-war colt, Remington rand, Ithaca) all have the same greenish hue to it.

In the middle is a US&S which has a dark grey look to it. US&S guns were actually not parkerized, but used a different process instead called du-lite.

In regards to the color, in most cases what you want to look for is a greenish hue to the gun. Most post-war and modern parkerization is light grey in color. For example, here is a post-war re-parked Remigton Rand. Compare the color difference to the Rand in the picture.



But also take into account my statement that there is no hard and fast rule. While *most* WW2 M1911A1s have a greenish hue, not all of them do. By 1945 Remington Rand started using a different mix of Parkerizing solutions which resulted in late war guns having the same "light grey" look to them.

Also note that Government Re-arsenal guns will also have a light-grey look to them.

How do the stamps look?
Another telltale sign of a repark is how the stamps look. One of the main stamps that collectors look for is the cross cannon stamp. The stamp was applied after parkerization, so it often broke through the finish and exposed metal in the white. Here are two examples of cross cannon stamps on original guns




HOWEVER, no hard and fast rules. I've also seen other original guns where the stamp was not applied with enough force to break through the finish. In other words, if you see metal in the white, that is a good indicator. However if you don't, do not assume the gun does not have original finish. Look for other clues as well.

Take a look at the other stampings as well. Are they crisp? or do they have a blurred look? Do they seem filled in with parkerization? Also, does the gun have machining marks? The presence of machining marks is a good indicator that the gun is original.


Look at how sharp the serial numbers are. Also note the maching marks on the trigger guard. If the gun had been refinished we would lose a lot of the details here. Compare with this pretty obvious example of a refinish


Look at how the marks are all kind of soft and washed out.

One other area to look at (as ZenMastaT pointed out) is the half-moon cutout behind the trigger. There should be a distinct edge to it. I hope he doesn't mind if I repost his pic here



See how soft the edge of the half moon cutout looks? now compare it with this


So you have to combine all of these clues to form an opinion if the gun has been refinished or not. Does the color look right? Can I see metal in the raw on the cross cannon? Do the stampings look good? Are the edges sharp? What I presented are just the basics, there are a lot of other things to look for. For example, around serial #800,000 Colt experimented with another finish called Parko-Lubrite. It almost feels like the gun has a Teflon coating. Unless you know this you would probably guess the gun has been refinished. My point being, get the book!

Step Four - Check the Barrel
The next obvious, easy thing to check for is the barrel.

Colt -- Barrel should be marked "Colt 45 Auto", left side of barrel above Lug. Note, if the Colt 45 Auto is visible from the ejection port then it is a commercial replacement.


Remington Rand -- early guns will have colt barrels. Most Remington Rands will have High Standard barrels which can be identified with a "HS" stamping. Remington Rand also used a small number of Flannery Bolt barrels marked with a "F" instead of a "HS"


Ithaca -- same as RR above.

US&S -- almost always a HS barrel.

Step Five -- Check the small parts
If you passed everything up to this point then you have a candidate for an all original gun. The next step would be to check the small parts, but that is beyond the scope of this post. Every manufacturer had a large variation in their small parts. We are talking about stuff like eight ribs on the mainspring housing on a Colt vs nine ribs on a Remington Rand. Etc. Since we are potentially talking about a high dollar gun, buy the book. It will tell you what to look for -- number of ribs, number of diamonds, etc, etc.

Ok that's about it. I'll come back later and do some edits and clean up, but these are the steps I go through when looking for an original WW2 M1911A1.

ZenMastaT
Apr 4, 2005

I dun shot my dick off

Hah, I knew I should have just waited and you'd handle that question a lot better than I could. One thing I'd love to see some day is a similar guide for identifying WWI 1911s, specifically the various correct finishes. I know the early guns like your 1912 have ludicrous quality bluing all the way to the Colt Black Army of 1918 with its extremely fragile finish but I don't really know what the tell tale signs are there.

Was it just Colt, Remington UMC and Springfield Armory for WWI? Savage made slides or something too right?

Darth Freddy
Feb 6, 2007

An Emperor's slightest dislike is transmitted to those who serve him, and there it is amplified into rage.

AceOverdose posted:

If you enjoy the P239 your should try out the P938. It is really nice and comes in many flavors. The breakdown is simple too, stays basic 1911 until you get to the trigger.

http://www.sigsauer.com/CatalogProd...stols-p938.aspx

Basticle posted:

I'm not sure if he meant 239 or 238. You're thinking of the 238 which is the .380 version of the 938. The 239 is a completely different design.

Yeah its the p239, that P938 is a little smaller then I am looking for. More wanting a full size frame. Is S&W still a good brand when it comes to semi-autos? I have to grab the model number tomorrow but my dealer has one in 9mm going for 387$ and that seems a little to cheap/good to be true.

Cbear
Mar 22, 2005


Beetle, you are quite a loving asset on this forum. Please never leave us.

Also, how often do you even see Singers?

Duckboat
May 15, 2012


Beetle, you're quite an informative dude, thanks for sharing.

Tonedef, those are some quality-looking pistols, I hope the business goes well.
I gotta say, I don't think I've ever seen 1911's with machined finger grooves before.

Basticle
Sep 12, 2011



I was bored and browsing STI's website and I noticed The GI, a basic mil-spec model that must be brand new as it wasnt there earlier this year.





MSRP is $874 but if you're deadset on a [new] milspec 1911 its a drat sight classier looking than anything else out there.

Basticle fucked around with this message at 02:25 on Oct 24, 2013

Outside Dawg
Feb 24, 2013


Newest denizen of the lair.

beetle
Oct 12, 2012

Wie ein Chef!


ZenMastaT posted:

Hah, I knew I should have just waited and you'd handle that question a lot better than I could. One thing I'd love to see some day is a similar guide for identifying WWI 1911s, specifically the various correct finishes. I know the early guns like your 1912 have ludicrous quality bluing all the way to the Colt Black Army of 1918 with its extremely fragile finish but I don't really know what the tell tale signs are there.

Was it just Colt, Remington UMC and Springfield Armory for WWI? Savage made slides or something too right?

I kind of avoided WWI 1911s on purpose, simply because there are too many variations to summarize. For just the Colt finishes you are talking at least five variations (high polish, matte, brushed, black army, transitional). Also a lot of different inspection stamps, etc.

In any event any time you are talking WWI or before you are talking guns in the $5K+ range, so get the book

Colt, Remington UMC, and Springfield were the main manufacturers. However, there are a small number of North American Arms (out of Quebec) floating around as well as AJ Savage slides.

Cbear posted:

Also, how often do you even see Singers?

I see about maybe 3-4 a year, but lately they have been the "one offs" (tool room, experimental, pre-production, etc). it's been about a year since I saw a production/issued example.

beetle fucked around with this message at 03:17 on Oct 24, 2013

right arm
Oct 29, 2011



Basticle posted:

I was bored and browsing STI's website and I noticed The GI, a basic mil-spec model that must be brand new as it wasnt there earlier this year.





MSRP is $874 but if you're deadset on a [new] milspec 1911 its a drat sight classier looking than anything else out there.

that safety is real gross

briefcasefullof
Sep 25, 2004
[This Space for Rent]

tonedef131 posted:

In order to prove to you that our pistols are as robust as we say they are, we offer a lifetime guarantee on every gun we sell. Our current production models are Government and Commander size in stainless and well as Commander and Officer in aluminum. Our anodized aluminum line uses all the same components as the steel models but the frame and mainspring housing are machined out of billet aluminum and feature a rounded tail.


I have to say that your Officer-sized 1911 looks really amazing. It's the sort of thing I might carry over my Glock if I had one.

Bigass Moth
Mar 6, 2004

I joined the #RXT REVOLUTION.

he knows...


Awesome posts in this thread.

Question about mixmasters: if parts used are of a rarer model (like a US&S slide on a Colt frame) does that affect pricing or are all mixmasters in the same price range regardless of components?

beetle
Oct 12, 2012

Wie ein Chef!


Bigass Moth posted:

Awesome posts in this thread.

Question about mixmasters: if parts used are of a rarer model (like a US&S slide on a Colt frame) does that affect pricing or are all mixmasters in the same price range regardless of components?

if the parts have been bubba'd (for example big rear end sights put onto a US&S slide), then there would be no difference in value.

if the slide is still in original GI spec then perhaps there may be a small increase in value due to the novelty factor. I couldn't say for certain that a US&S mixmaster would fetch $100 more, but given two guns of equal condition the US&S may sell first/faster or get more offers. but then again that's really only for collectors. the average joe will want a Colt.

If by some weird reason it had a Singer slide then that's a different story. You could probably part out the singer slide for big bucks, even if it has been reparked.

Basticle
Sep 12, 2011



right arm posted:

that safety is real gross

Im not even sure what you mean by this?

stik
Apr 19, 2008



beetle posted:

if the parts have been bubba'd (for example big rear end sights put onto a US&S slide), then there would be no difference in value.

if the slide is still in original GI spec then perhaps there may be a small increase in value due to the novelty factor. I couldn't say for certain that a US&S mixmaster would fetch $100 more, but given two guns of equal condition the US&S may sell first/faster or get more offers. but then again that's really only for collectors. the average joe will want a Colt.

If by some weird reason it had a Singer slide then that's a different story. You could probably part out the singer slide for big bucks, even if it has been reparked.

I have a mixmaster with a US&S slide on a Remington Rand frame. I also have a Caspian frame with a Remington Rand slide on it but it never seemed worth it to try to switch the slides. My GI gun isn't ever going to be super collectable anyway so why bother trying to match parts.

ZenMastaT
Apr 4, 2005

I dun shot my dick off

I know I saw a mixmaster US&S gun on gunbroker pull some extra bucks above what the rest of the mixmasters were selling for but that might have just been a lucky seller.

You have any pictures of your 1911s stik?

stik
Apr 19, 2008



ZenMastaT posted:

I know I saw a mixmaster US&S gun on gunbroker pull some extra bucks above what the rest of the mixmasters were selling for but that might have just been a lucky seller.

You have any pictures of your 1911s stik?

Sure, here are the two in question:

Close up of the markings on my mixmaster

And the mighty Caspington complete with the old rack number on the grips

It is only built to look like a 1911A1, I put a long trigger in it and it is super tight. I built it for service pistol matches at the club. NM barrel and bushing, trigger job etc. It's a really fun gun that I should shoot more.

Ygolonac
Nov 26, 2007

pre:
*************
CLUTCH  NIXON
*************

The Hero We Need


Basticle posted:

Im not even sure what you mean by this?

It's not as nice as a small-tab original GI safety, but it's light-years better than "giant loving landing flap modern thumb safety".

Look awfully like the one on my RIA.

Applesnots
Oct 22, 2010

MERRY YOBMAS



I guess I'll post my scrub gun.

Yeah, It's a Remington R1. I paid $550 out the door for it nib. Two eight round mags and a decent hard case. I am happy with it. No ftf or fte after more than a thousand rounds. I guess I got a good one.

HappyCapybaraFamily
Sep 16, 2009

Roger Baolong Thunder Dragon has been fascinated by this sophisticated and scientifically beautiful industry since childhood, and has shown his talent in the design and manufacture of watches.

Nap Ghost

Anyone know if this would work in a Ruger SR1911?

http://palmettostatearmory.com/inde...it-1100043.html

captaininsano
Sep 29, 2004
"If I where going to die, I'd be dead already"

I posted this thing a couple years ago, but I think its too terrible to keep it hidden from the world forever.

So I have this thing, it looks like a 1911 except its not... its more like a pot steel piece of poo poo. it literally wasn't even even completely cast and has pitting and holes. holes which go completely through to the hammer strut. it rusted within hours when I was trying to clean it up after I found it rusting and completely apart in a coffee can in the back of a closet at my parents house.

My dad warmed me it was a lost cause, but I'm not one to give up, especially on terrible ideas, so I got creative. It got a custom refinish courtesy of a rattle can of flat black Hi-temp Engine paint. custom grips via some rosewood wood paneling samples from the late 70's. hand shaped on a belt sander in a vice and finished with 00 steel wool, a wet sand and some BLO, it then got super high end grip emblems courtesy of the tiny Cadillac crest on the back courtesy lights in the back deck area of 70's Cadillacs. It hasn't rusted again so far and the multiple coats of Engine paint and sanding filled all but the worst pitting and holes.

sure its a piece of poo poo, but other than occasional FTFs, jams and mild stove piping, it runs ok. Spring changes have helped as well as some smoothing on the slide rails. I still wouldn't pick it if my life depended on it, but its fun to take out and put lead into dirt berms and its a bit of a conversation piece at the range.







dubzee
Oct 23, 2008



Mr.Bob posted:

I guess I'll post my scrub gun.

Yeah, It's a Remington R1. I paid $550 out the door for it nib. Two eight round mags and a decent hard case. I am happy with it. No ftf or fte after more than a thousand rounds. I guess I got a good one.

Is that a little Buddy Christ statue?

Kennebago
Nov 12, 2007

van de schande is bevrijd
hij die met walkuren rijd


Mr.Bob posted:

I guess I'll post my scrub gun.

Yeah, It's a Remington R1. I paid $550 out the door for it nib. Two eight round mags and a decent hard case. I am happy with it. No ftf or fte after more than a thousand rounds. I guess I got a good one.

Whatever Remington uses as a finish on those guns has me leery (what exactly is "oxide" finish?) but yours looks better than the Bruniton on my Beretta 92 does at a similar round count - do you shoot from a holster a lot?

TopherCStone
Feb 27, 2013

I am very important and deserve your attention


Operating Rod posted:

(what exactly is "oxide" finish?)

It's literally what bluing is. The chemicals form black oxide of iron on the outside of the metal, protecting it from further rust.

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Applesnots
Oct 22, 2010

MERRY YOBMAS



dubzee posted:

Is that a little Buddy Christ statue?

Yup.

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