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Great Enoch
Mar 23, 2011




~£30 a month. I think it's the only consumer-priced 70/20 plan in the UK that doesn't have a usage cap (traffic prioritisation instead). I happen to live above a cabinet which is quite fortunate.

This is a nine-fold increase on my previous service which cost the god damned same. You get a real sense of the infrastructural priorities in London by looking at ADSL2+ speeds there and even more by who gets queued in the FTTC rollout. BT engineers are completely unprofessional assholes, incidentally (I think they're technically contractors).

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dogstile
May 1, 2012

fucking clocks
how do they work?


All the big companies don't actually hire people who know how to troubleshoot, they hire people that can drive and follow instructions. I can count on one hand the amount of times virgin/bt have sent out a guy who actually knows his poo poo. One was surprised I had the ability to go wireless but still used a wire on my PC because they were "exactly the same". How is plusnets service anyway? I'm always wary of them because they seem to have a lot of small print.

Rukus
Mar 13, 2007

Hmph.


Just upgraded from 28/1 to 150/10.


Costs $85 a month, which includes unlimited bandwidth if you volunteer to have your connection throttled to 15mbit from 8pm-12am, which is enough for a few Netflix streams.

Ataraxia
Jun 15, 2001

Champion of nothing.


dogstile posted:

All the big companies don't actually hire people who know how to troubleshoot, they hire people that can drive and follow instructions. I can count on one hand the amount of times virgin/bt have sent out a guy who actually knows his poo poo. One was surprised I had the ability to go wireless but still used a wire on my PC because they were "exactly the same". How is plusnets service anyway? I'm always wary of them because they seem to have a lot of small print.

Plusnet are pretty good, even if they are now owned by BT. Just remember to pay them on time because they will cut you off in about 0.03 microseconds if your billing isn't up to date.

TheCoach
Mar 11, 2014



Costs me the equivalent of 20$ a month, no limits and a free access to all their wifi hotspots.
Will reupgrade to 300/150 when i have a bit more money, that costs 32$ a month.

Dobermaniac
Jun 10, 2004


Comcast finally finished my line construction and put in my business 50/10 service yesterday. It's pretty awesome going from a 1/1 WISP to 50/10 hardline. The 1/1 Wisp was down about 20% of the time randomly throughout the month. I finally told them to pack their poo poo up and called comcast. 3 months later, I have 50/10 service with no out of pocket costs with about 2000 ft of line/amps that needed to be run.


Bohemian Cowabunga
Mar 24, 2008



My boss thought my internet bill was low when I handed him the bill, so he told to upgrade my speed if I wanted.



Paying around the equivalent of $35

kompukarl
Sep 20, 2013




I heard Comcast has started to roll out speed increases in some areas. So if you could get this same speed at the price of the 50 meg tier ($60 - $70 per month) the price per megabit is drastically better than the $114 per month that the service currently costs.

moron izzard
Nov 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

ful posted:



Does anyone know if satellite is worth shelling out for?

Siochain posted:

No. I've never seen a decent satellite connection - at best same'ish download, maybe better upload, but 200+ms ping.
Satellite is poo poo.


Here is Exede at my parent's house (formerly Wildblue). It was 9 / 6 when it got installed. I also have a dell tech remoted in right now.



our monthly cap is 10GB a month for I think $50 a month (unlimited bandwidth between 12 and 5)? There are higher caps available (not really higher)




Windstream is supposed to bring 6 meg DSL here this year. They built a new substation at the end of our road last year. It literally is powered up. But they won't offer it yet, and won't tell us when they plan to.

moron izzard fucked around with this message at Apr 5, 2014 around 21:59

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007


A Yolo Wizard posted:

Here is Exede at my parent's house (formerly Wildblue). It was 9 / 6 when it got installed. I also have a dell tech remoted in right now.



our monthly cap is 10GB a month for I think $50 a month (unlimited bandwidth between 12 and 5)? There are higher caps available (not really higher)




Windstream is supposed to bring 6 meg DSL here this year. They built a new substation at the end of our road last year. It literally is powered up. But they won't offer it yet, and won't tell us when they plan to.

Dat ping.

Fayez Butts
Aug 24, 2006



Dat monthly cap.

Qvark
May 4, 2010




Paying 40$/month

frayed time
Oct 20, 2008


Does anyone know if Exede / Wildblue provides publicly routable IPs?

I had HughesNet before and they give IPs out that are behind Carrier Grade NAT, killing any remote access possibilities.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


KillHour posted:

Dat ping.

Welcome to the world of satellite communication. Most consumer satellite networks are in geostationary orbit because it allows a stationary dish rather than requiring expensive tracking and positioning equipment to constantly re-point the dish. Geostationary orbit for this planet is 22,236 miles above the equator. If you recall your high school physics class, the speed of light is 186,282 miles per second.

22236 miles / (186282 miles / second) = 0.1194 seconds or 119.4 milliseconds.

That's the one-way trip time from the moment the signal is emitted from the ground until it is received at the satellite or vice versa. Also, achieving this time requires being directly underneath the satellite. If you're anywhere else on the planet you're probably further away, adding more time.

Now let's think about a ping. For simplicity's sake let's say you're pinging something at the ISP's headend rather than actually going out over the internet, and we'll ignore any latency introduced in the modem, satellite, or headend equipment as it should be relatively minimal.

000 ms: Your computer sends the ping, the modem transmits it to the satellite.
120 ms: The satellite receives the message, forwards it to the headend.
240 ms: The headend receives the message, sends it to the target computer.
240 ms: The target computer receives the ping, replies.
240 ms: The headend transmits the reply up to the satellite.
360 ms: The satellite receives the message, forwards it back down to your modem.
480 ms: Your modem receives the reply and forwards it to your computer.

That's almost a half of a second delay, bare minimum, in absolutely ideal conditions. Being further from the equator adds a few milliseconds to each leg, as does being at a different latitiude. For example where I'm at in NE Ohio (41.1N, 81.7W) to the Exede satellite in the 115.1W orbital slot the extra distance would add another 9 milliseconds. It looks like most of their ground stations are in the western US, so picking the closest one to the bird in Tuscon, AZ (32N, 111W) there's 4 milliseconds there as well. That puts us at 506 milliseconds minimum theoretical round-trip time from an average US location without having even reached the internet.

This is why no one ever recommends satellite over terrestrial broadband services. It is an option of last resort for those who can't get useful service any other way. Real-time games are made effectively unplayable and any sort of live communication takes on a delay comparable to that of an old-school international telephone call (which of course used geostationary satellites).


A satellite service provider can of course operate at a lower altitude to reduce latency, as well as using orbits that cross over the targeted service area, but this introduces a number of problems including how to point the clients at the birds, relaying messages when the bird is in a spot that it can't see a ground station, and additional fuel requirements to maintain the proper orbit with greater drag from the slight bits of atmosphere out there. You also need a lot of equipment up there instead of just one. The Iridium satellite network uses this approach with 66 active satellites and a few spares. Obviously all this costs significantly more to operate than a single big satellite in GEO with a bunch of spot beams.

buglord
Jul 31, 2010

Imagine growing a flower



I remember going from AT&T Broadband to DirecWay (now Hughesnet) when we moved to the countryside in 2007. Not only was the bill $75/mo (compared to our previous $40), but 500ms pings were a daily basis thing. 90% of my online games became unplayable, and there was always a 50/50 chance the host would kick me from an RTS game lobby. There were daily data caps instead of monthly data caps, but it was at 200MB a day. Youtube, service packs, game patches, and the like were all pretty much impossible. Torrents became my friend because I could download like 150mb a day, and use the 50mb for regular browsing since they'd throttle me down to dialup for 24 hours if I broke that cap. Reliability was an enormous issue too. Winters were usually no-game seasons since rain or wind would completely disable the satellite. One magical day I called AT&T again and they confirmed DSL was now available in my area for $40/mo. No data caps, better reliability, and 6MBPS/768KBPS internet. I remember downloading all day just to enjoy the speed.

The good thing about having satellite internet is that you permanently appreciate everything that isn't satellite once you break free. Everything feels like some kind of blessing, and now I feel like a filthy rich person for having 25MBS/5MBS even though this seems par for course now.

Rat Supremacy
Jul 15, 2007

The custom title is an image and/or line of text that appears below your name in the forums



Virgin used to be utter poo poo in Brighton, but now they are pretty damned good. Paying £35 ish for 120MBits.

wwb
Aug 17, 2004



Fun with special exhibit networks:



[actual top end is a bi-directional gig, ookla can't handle it]

Ignoarints
Nov 26, 2010


Bohemian Cowabunga posted:

My boss thought my internet bill was low when I handed him the bill, so he told to upgrade my speed if I wanted.



Paying around the equivalent of $35

I remember these days. It was in fact my only choice too

wolrah posted:

Welcome to the world of satellite communication. Most consumer satellite networks are in geostationary orbit because it allows a stationary dish rather than requiring expensive tracking and positioning equipment to constantly re-point the dish. Geostationary orbit for this planet is 22,236 miles above the equator. If you recall your high school physics class, the speed of light is 186,282 miles per second.

22236 miles / (186282 miles / second) = 0.1194 seconds or 119.4 milliseconds.

That's the one-way trip time from the moment the signal is emitted from the ground until it is received at the satellite or vice versa. Also, achieving this time requires being directly underneath the satellite. If you're anywhere else on the planet you're probably further away, adding more time.

Now let's think about a ping. For simplicity's sake let's say you're pinging something at the ISP's headend rather than actually going out over the internet, and we'll ignore any latency introduced in the modem, satellite, or headend equipment as it should be relatively minimal.

000 ms: Your computer sends the ping, the modem transmits it to the satellite.
120 ms: The satellite receives the message, forwards it to the headend.
240 ms: The headend receives the message, sends it to the target computer.
240 ms: The target computer receives the ping, replies.
240 ms: The headend transmits the reply up to the satellite.
360 ms: The satellite receives the message, forwards it back down to your modem.
480 ms: Your modem receives the reply and forwards it to your computer.

That's almost a half of a second delay, bare minimum, in absolutely ideal conditions. Being further from the equator adds a few milliseconds to each leg, as does being at a different latitiude. For example where I'm at in NE Ohio (41.1N, 81.7W) to the Exede satellite in the 115.1W orbital slot the extra distance would add another 9 milliseconds. It looks like most of their ground stations are in the western US, so picking the closest one to the bird in Tuscon, AZ (32N, 111W) there's 4 milliseconds there as well. That puts us at 506 milliseconds minimum theoretical round-trip time from an average US location without having even reached the internet.

This is why no one ever recommends satellite over terrestrial broadband services. It is an option of last resort for those who can't get useful service any other way. Real-time games are made effectively unplayable and any sort of live communication takes on a delay comparable to that of an old-school international telephone call (which of course used geostationary satellites).


A satellite service provider can of course operate at a lower altitude to reduce latency, as well as using orbits that cross over the targeted service area, but this introduces a number of problems including how to point the clients at the birds, relaying messages when the bird is in a spot that it can't see a ground station, and additional fuel requirements to maintain the proper orbit with greater drag from the slight bits of atmosphere out there. You also need a lot of equipment up there instead of just one. The Iridium satellite network uses this approach with 66 active satellites and a few spares. Obviously all this costs significantly more to operate than a single big satellite in GEO with a bunch of spot beams.

And I remember all this when I suffered on this. Very clearly. In fact, learning about those very satellites and then later finding out how low other satellites could be gave me a super strong perception of how large and small our planet is (combined with some live feed of the earth channel on dish network). All because of lovely satellite internet pings. It was so bad it opened up my mind.

Ignoarints fucked around with this message at Apr 23, 2014 around 06:05

H.R. Paperstacks
May 1, 2006

This is America
My president is black
and my Lambo is blue



Saturated Download


Cox 150/20 Service in Panhandle of Florida. Go..Go PowerBoost

sellouts
Apr 23, 2003



wwb posted:

Fun with special exhibit networks:



[actual top end is a bi-directional gig, ookla can't handle it]

Man, and I thought I was excited about Maxx rolling out...if it ever rolls out.

mainks
Jun 13, 2013



Read it and weep boys.

thechalkoutline
Jul 7, 2006





Is pointless bragging allowed here? The company network!

less than three
Aug 9, 2007

Fire Sights and LED Lights

ESC 2010 Never Forget

Fallen Rib

mainks posted:

Read it and weep boys.



It's funny that F+ speed in Denmark would net you probably a B in Canada.

TardiveDyskinesia
Mar 8, 2014




its either 4g or Satellite in my rural area. I'll take this 4g anytime. Better than my lovely DSL in Phx.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


thechalkoutline posted:



Is pointless bragging allowed here? The company network!

Why is the upload so pedestrian?

Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

Inspector_666 posted:

Why is the upload so pedestrian?

As far as I know it is pretty common here in Europe to have high download speeds and moderate upload speeds.
The ISPs explain it by saying that the actual network bandwidth is limited and people prefer download speeds over upload speeds, so they shift the balance.

And let's be real here, normal internet usage is mainly a downstream affair and you don't need to be able to upload at 100 mbit. And if you want to stream your mad laning carry or whatever it is in DOTA to Twitch.tv in HD you still don't need more than 3 mbit if you're doing it right.

So I'm guessing that that company is just being smart and not spending money on upload capacity they won't use.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


Geemer posted:

So I'm guessing that that company is just being smart and not spending money on upload capacity they won't use.

Most "real bandwidth" connections like those used by ISPs are symmetrical, so they're still paying for it, but if they can sell you an asymmetrical connection then they can also sell their upstream capacity to upstream-heavy users like datacenters.

Last-mile type connections like DSL, DOCSIS (Cable), PON, cellular, etc. are actually asymmetrical by design, but pretty much anything involving dedicated lines (T1/3, OCxx, etc.) is physically capable of the same speed in both directions and any asymmetry is being artificially introduced by the provider.

Also, I'm happy. My ISP finally processed my upgrade, so I now have the fastest non-fiber home internet in the state of Ohio.

Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Geemer posted:

As far as I know it is pretty common here in Europe to have high download speeds and moderate upload speeds.
The ISPs explain it by saying that the actual network bandwidth is limited and people prefer download speeds over upload speeds, so they shift the balance.

And let's be real here, normal internet usage is mainly a downstream affair and you don't need to be able to upload at 100 mbit. And if you want to stream your mad laning carry or whatever it is in DOTA to Twitch.tv in HD you still don't need more than 3 mbit if you're doing it right.

So I'm guessing that that company is just being smart and not spending money on upload capacity they won't use.

I just figured that Activision's company network would need good upload and wouldn't skimp on it regardless given that they've invested in a plan with 700 down. I mean, that's a slower upload than my home cable connection.

messed-up lady bits
May 5, 2006


I am so ready to move out of this apartment building. The joys of complimentary WiFi! Might be worth a chuckle for you guys with excellent internet speed.

z06ck
Dec 22, 2010



Left of the Dial posted:

I am so ready to move out of this apartment building. The joys of complimentary WiFi! Might be worth a chuckle for you guys with excellent internet speed.





messed-up lady bits
May 5, 2006



Hey, on good nights I've had download speeds as fast as 3 mbps!

tk
Dec 10, 2003





Decided to treat myself to some gig internet. I'll have to see if I can find something to max this out.

sellouts
Apr 23, 2003



Inspector_666 posted:

I just figured that Activision's company network would need good upload and wouldn't skimp on it regardless given that they've invested in a plan with 700 down. I mean, that's a slower upload than my home cable connection.

Why wouldn't they have equipment on site that could shape the upload depending on their needs?

We run a slower network and have to put that in place or else a few connections make it painful for everyone else

Anyone here on TWC after the Maxx upgrade in Los Angeles? I can't get a straight answer on when it is launching.

teagone
Jun 10, 2003

Valyrian, motherfucker! Do you speak it?!



Nearly $80 a month for that.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

HYPER-THREADING


Left of the Dial posted:

I am so ready to move out of this apartment building. The joys of complimentary WiFi! Might be worth a chuckle for you guys with excellent internet speed.



That's about what I get, and my apartment building is ACROSS THE STREET FROM AT&T's main offices in my city. COME ON JUST STRING SOME FIBER ACROSS THE WAY

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless you, ants. Blants.




Fun Shoe

tk posted:



Decided to treat myself to some gig internet. I'll have to see if I can find something to max this out.

Jesus gently caress…

Baggins
Feb 21, 2007

Like a Great Wind!




I'm happy enough with that, considering I paid a bit more for a 3/512k connection when I first moved to Ireland 8 years ago.

Pudgygiant
Apr 8, 2004

Garnet and black? More like gold and blue or whatever the fuck colors these are

wolrah posted:

Welcome to the world of satellite communication. Most consumer satellite networks are in geostationary orbit because it allows a stationary dish rather than requiring expensive tracking and positioning equipment to constantly re-point the dish. Geostationary orbit for this planet is 22,236 miles above the equator. If you recall your high school physics class, the speed of light is 186,282 miles per second.

ViaSat's new Ka-band service is really badass, by the way. The only systems I have access to that use it are classified, but suffice to say they've got to be using crazy LEO birds to get the pings they get. There's not that big of a difference between a bad day on CenturyLink DSL and a good day on ViaSat. Disclaimer it's a FFP/O government contract with absolutely unrealistic SLAs so I'm sure everything on the path is dedicated.

One of my former PMs is at a South American company that's doing some hot-poo poo enterprise grade satcom stuff too, things like onsite caching servers with completely OOB updating. Between that and the monster bandwidth available once the full Ka spectrum is opened up, an average consumer really wouldn't notice a difference outside of gaming and Netflix.

revmoo
May 25, 2006

Reverend Moo

Note to Time Warner Cable: You can only play the "let's gently caress with this guy's rate several times a year" game so much until you finally reach a point where the dsl competitor is the same price.

Just got done ordering my new DSL line. loving TWC jacked my rate FOUR TIMES in the last twelve months without so much as a day's notice.

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Inspector_666
Oct 7, 2003

benny with the good hair


Wait, your option for DSL was more or equally as expensive as your cable option? And you went to DSL?

TWC sucks, but ughhhhhh DSL.

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