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LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

How do I search for telecommuting jobs? I've always been willing to relocate before so I don't know where to start looking.

My wife is going through the final stages of getting offers from companies in Washington and Illinois so I can't apply to positions in either location because I can't promise I'd be able to move there and one of the cities is small enough I'd likely only be able to find something telecommuting anyways.

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LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

rt4 posted:

Answer technical questions before they sign the contract, provide the technical details of the sales pitch that the sales staff isn't qualified to describe, run demos, then help them get configured after they make the purchase. May include incentive pay for helping to sell larger products.

I'm already doing the post-signup part of this job, but we're reorganizing the workflow so the sales engineers handle the whole thing from initial contact to launching their application. They want me for this role, I think, because I have a decent grasp of the technology and a stronger capability (or desire) for things like leading customer-facing conference calls than the other support staff.

It mostly feels like getting paid to do softwarechat, so...yeah, I guess I do want this job.

The guys I worked with who did this ended up doing a lot of traveling and trade-show after parties. They seemed to enjoy it.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Good Will Hrunting posted:

Todayís update is boring. My new tech lead said even though heís still new heís very pleased that Iím on the team and has told Mr. Manager that many times. He also disclosed that Mr. Manager has asked him many times about me and he claims he told him he was very happy with me. I shared some of the things that happened yesterday and he was very taken aback. Then I asked him what I could improve on and we really didnít have much beyond tips for dealing with Anus. He also said heís had his PRs picked apart by Shithead and that Clownshoes lacks managerial skills and also lots of other poo poo, not that it really matters. He was pretty upset and asked me to at least see phase 1 through, I said ďyeah sure Iím not gonna leave!!!!Ē because for all I know he could be a spy.

HR has a few potential options on other teams and already figured out why Iím asking. Itís going to be escalated to the top of HR.

gently caress this guy.

That all sounds pretty promising for what is still a lovely situation.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Where do you get your tech news?

I've been following ArsTechnica for several years, but this past year their reporting hasn't been as good as I remember it and their comments area has a much higher noise-to-signal ratio than it used to.

Hacker News has had some interesting stories over the years, but it doesn't really provide a good overview.

A couple of my coworkers like The Verge. What are goon opinions of it?

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

RubberBands Hurt posted:

They usually ask the same question a few different ways to check consistency a bit.

My boss loved these as well, and sent a few different versions around to try and get some insight, but thankfully did not try and force anyone to post answers.

Look on the bright side, your boss wants to relate to you in a positive fashion and is willing to go at least a little out of his way to accommodate you.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Get a job somewhere that doesn't involve a 90+ minute commute.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Any advice for finding remote openings? I worked remotely for about a month over the holidays because the main offices were closed down and it was pretty nice. I got more done than usual too because I was able to get started right at 7:30 or however earlier I woke up.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

JawnV6 posted:

God forbid a developer have like, a physical piece of hardware they need to test on. Unthinkable in the year 2018, must be evidence of outdated management processes.

Code entry, and therefore typing proficiency, is the limiting factor of the majority of development.

All my work at my last job was on embedded devices. (We made widgets, and watches, and cameras and all sorts of other things) and I worked with several people who were remote. It was never an issue. Just had to remember to ship them a test unit or 3 every so often. One of them was so good at staying in touch I kept forgetting he worked remotely until it was time to schedule the next round of HW deliveries.

Working on HW is not a meaningful impediment to remote work. The goal is to eventually ship thousands if not hundreds of thousands of your product after all. If the corporation is having a hard time shipping a single test unit they're going to have real trouble when it comes time to actually sell the silly thing.

LLSix fucked around with this message at Jan 10, 2018 around 14:53

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Hey so you know what's fuckin' exhausting? Having to keep tasks lined up in front of a productive engineer. I'm four days into being mini-TL for this project and I feel like that claymation GIF of laying track directly in front of a locomotive.

Haha, yeah, it can be. It's a good problem to have though. Much better than the opposite problem. Time to teach them how to lay their own tracks. Give him/her responsibility for a big piece of the project and let him/her loose.

I try not to break tasks down below 1 week when I'm TL. A month is better. Let the engineers break their own tasks down into smaller pieces for you and then help anyone who seems to be having trouble breaking things down into no more than day-sized tasks.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Love Stole the Day posted:

Applying to a recruiter proactively seems to be the default method of applying when you do it through LinkedIn, which has been where I've been finding things to apply to for the past few months. There doesn't seem to be any difference in results between reaching out to recruiters or reaching out to employers.
Will PM.

Try searching on Monster too. For me half the results on each site are the same, but the other half are different. While you're at it, create a Monster profile - I get more contacts from people who saw my Monster profile than I do through linkedin.

Since you've been looking for awhile, it's probably worth jumping through all the hoops to set up a StackOverflow profile.

I'm in a contract position right now so I always keep one eye on the job market.

Edit: You might also give https://www.ziprecruiter.com/ a try. I strongly dislike almost everything about them, but they occasionally come up with something interesting that the other two missed.

LLSix fucked around with this message at Jan 31, 2018 around 16:12

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

I've got an interview for a senior software engineer position tomorrow with a company that makes remote controlled cars/planes/boats etc. Sounds like it'll be about half mentoring (I've taught on and off so I'm confident about that) and half device driver writing which I'm less confident in. Any advice on interview prep for device driver stuff specifically? I think I'd feel less nervous if I had something to review before going in.

Also the interview is going to be at least 3 hours so that's something to look forward to.

LLSix fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2018 around 16:37

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

hendersa posted:

Good luck!

JawnV6 posted:

What's the biggest layout differences between I2C/SPI, which one is faster, why do we use the lovely one anyway.

csammis posted:

Let us know how it goes!

Thank you for all your help! They asked me literally none of that but I told them on the phone screen I usually worked on top of other people's device drivers so they may have felt inhibited.

I think it went really well. Lunch was 2 hours long which is a pretty good sign that at least my future potential boss liked me.

Hardest questions were from their project managers. Got asked to describe the end to end behavior of a joystick control and stumbled my way through it. Asked how I did afterwards and he said there was no right or wrong but I learned a few things from his answer for next time.

The other hard question I got asked was what I thought my job responsibilities would be; which I hate. Its the company's job to set expectations, not mine So I rephrased the question to asking about how I'd brought value to previous employers and talked about some big wins and savings my software/expertise had created in the past. Stuff that was mostly in my resume, but the more I interview the more I believe that nobody actually does more than skim the first 2 seconds worth anyways. One interviewer today actually misread the name of one of my previous employers in such a way that he thought I had experience in a totally different field

Weirdly, no whiteboard questions at all.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Anyone want to give some advice on mentoring? I have a more junior coworker who's trying to transition towards the software ladder (from a somewhat less-technical ladder whose name I forget ). They're basically getting dropped into the middle of a large codebase in a language (Typescript) that they've never used before, and they're struggling. Obvious things I can do include being verbally supportive, doing pair programming, answering questions, and checking in regularly to make sure they aren't blocked and/or despairing, but what else can/should I do?

Sounds like you're already covering most of the bases.

If I remember right, you assign work on your team? It would probably be helpful for them to be able to work in\with the same part of the codebase for awhile. Once they've got a good understanding of some part of the system they'll have a better basis for incorporating other pieces into their mental model.

Since they're working in a new language, introducing them to good references for that language in specific will probably help them alot. That way they can look up new things themselves. Since it sounds like they're new to programming they may not be familiar with more general sites like StackOverflow in which case you might want to give them that too.

Ideally typescript would have something like cppreference for c++, but I'm not familiar with typescript either so the best I could turn up in a few minutes with google was https://www.tutorialspoint.com/type...pt_overview.htm


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I think the team has good social dynamics, definitely they aren't being left out of lunch at least. I've sent them some code reviews of my work...haven't tried using them as a rubber duck though. Part of the difficulty there is that my primary domain is the backend, and they're looking at frontend code, so it's unlikely that any rubberduck-worthy problems I encounter are going to be comprehensible to them. I mean, that'd make them a great rubberduck for me because I'd have to break things down to a super-simple level...I just don't know how useful it'd be for them.

I think doing at least some rubber ducking would be helpful in giving them an opportunity to see how you work through problems. Pair programming is probably better for that, and if you're already doing that there may not be much to gain here.

You could also see if one of the other frontend guys is willing to help bring the transfer up to speed. Some of the places I've worked would pair engineers up in the same office with the expectation they'd help each other when they got stuck and then look for expert guidance if they were both stuck.

Maybe ask one of the frontend experts for suggestions on files that only have good code in them and can serve as reference points.


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Right, my big concern is that they'll just keep to themselves and quietly fail because they don't want to bother anyone "more important". But on the other hand I don't want to be intrusive either.

You can keep track of their progress by watching for commits from them, this is really easy to do if you do code reviews but you can also just check every morning to see if they're making good progress or if you should stop by and ask what they're working on to give them an opportunity to ask for help or unstuck themselves by talking through what they're working on.

This also will give you opportunities to train them to make smaller, more manageable commits.

LLSix fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2018 around 03:50

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

What's the typical way to calculate contract-to-hire hourly rates? A recruiter just pitched me a job they're looking to pay $30-$40/hour. Even $40/hour only works out to about $80,000/year and doesn't include any of the usual benefits like health insurance.

Also, it's a contract to hire position at a contracting company which seems... weird.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

What are good ways to ask about company culture and project planning in an interview? I've had a couple of interviews for team leader or senior engineer positions lately and have been getting back pretty generic answers so I think I'm not phrasing my questions effectively.

A great list of questions was posted the last time we discussed how to look for red flags during an interview (or maybe it was in the agilefall/newbie thread) but I haven't been able to find it.

LLSix fucked around with this message at Apr 22, 2018 around 09:21

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Rocko Bonaparte posted:

Is there a nice list of algorithm bullshit problems online that doesn't require signing into something? I have the prospect of a few interviews coming up. Previously, I seem to not have impressed people with finding the super-duper-most-efficient way of detecting anagrams or whatever and I need to brush up.

For what its worth, in my last interview when I offered to provide a better algorithm after giving the brute force one they said the brute force was all they really wanted and we moved on to the next question. You might want to try talking through your thought process while practicing algorithm stuff. A lot of places (in the midwest at least) seem more concerned with hearing the solution process than getting an optimal final result.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

geeves posted:

So my coworker has pretty much grown his own family tree of old subordinates over the last few months (quick note: 2 have been here for 2.5 years). He's only brought in 4 people over the last three months to interview and pretty much made it clear he was only interested in hiring people he's managed before. He's brought in zero female candidates saying they weren't qualified enough, this is even after I audited their code and resume.

Then he brings in this Skeletor-looking nutsack this week. We actually interviewed this travesty of a human 3 years ago and there were red flags galore. We actually interviewed him for my coworker's position and he couldn't pass a simple code test. It wasn't anything major, we gave him a Fibonacci problem. He sat there for 5 minutes, in complete silence staring at the screen, even after we asked him what he was stuck on, etc. and said, "Let's work on this together and figure it out." Then he just pushed the laptop away and said, "I pass."

This week, I gave him a different problem - still just as simple - and the amount of handholding my boss and I had to do to get him through 15 lines of code was astounding. He has 13+ years of experience. The rest of the interview he sat around like he already had the job. Overall it was a very weird and awkward hour.

It gets better.

Two VPs interviewed him - just quick 15-minute meet and greets - and he told one of them that he had anger issues in the past.

I actually knew this as my coworker and two other members of his tree joked about this guy and his anger issues.

Coworker replied to the VP and said, "Yes, I actually fired him for that in the past because he blew up on somebody. But he's worked on it and is okay now."

Everyone but my coworker was uneasy about this guy, but yet he gets an offer. What the gently caress. I know we've had it rough finding talent in the city, but to slum it like this.

Basically everyone was overruled and the offer went out. gently caress. He has 13 years of experience and is getting an offer as a junior dev.

We're still a small team and we've had a couple of bad employees already over the years (that we got rid of thankfully). Hopefully he won't pass the background check.

Ahh, sour, sour empire building. How I haven't missed you.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Code comments like these are how you know you are working with reliable professionals

code:
// handle maillog bs
I, of course, have been tasked with copying the mail log logic to another page. That is the entirety of the documentation for the feature.

By copying I obviously mean I plan to abstract it out into functions which can be invoked everywhere it is needed instead of just blindly pasting and doubling the maintenance needed in the future.

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

code:
/********************************************************
No Comments are necessary for this. <CTO's three letter initials>
********************************************************/

LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

Looking for some feedback on my resume. I tried to inline my language and technical skills with their relevant tasks and job experience to make space for more work experience examples.

I've worked primarily in embedded devices and for family reasons have moved to an area without any companies that need embedded developers. So I'm primarily applying to remote work, most of which is CRUD and web-based it looks like which I'm happy to do. I took a semi-local job with a company that makes a CRUD app to be able to put something on my resume that's shows I can do that kind of work. Is it better off at the bottom of my job experience list since its the position I've had that involves the least responsibility and is least impressive; or if it needs to be at the top to highlight that I've done the kind of jobs I'm applying to before?

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LLSix
Jan 20, 2010

The real power behind countless overlords

csammis posted:

I'm doing an interview via Google Hangouts and HackerRack next week...never done one of these "on line" coding things before This is for a firmware engineering position so I'm even less certain what to expect. Isn't HackerRank testing primarily geared towards basic algorithms?

It also has a reasonably accessible in-browser IDE which is all the interviewer is using it for. It's kind of like remoting into their PC and typing in an IDE of the interviewer's choice but without all the pesky security issues that would raise.

I'd suggest trying a few problems in whatever language the interview is going to be in. Not for the problems, but to get used to the error message you get back. They're often more cryptic than what you'd get in a non-browser IDE for that language.

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