Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Post
  • Reply
Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


I read the last couple of pages and this jumped out at me with how true it rings.

mrmcd posted:

My European team members showed me a slide deck they all got as part of a "be better at perf" training that basically boiled down to: "We know it seems gross and uncomfortable and so horribly American to write long documents praising yourself, but it's ok, learn to ignore it. Promo and calibration committees won't be able to accurately assess you if you write vague accomplishments in the passive voice."

I am from (almost eastern) europe and writing self-praise does definitely feel disgusting and weird.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


I came through CS program (well, CS undergrad, AI focused Master) and I would recommend it, but I live in country where university is free, as god intended

Most of the things I could say have already been said, but as to the publishing thing... I know couple of people* who actually moved the sum of scientific knowledge forward as part of their Master's thesis, or even during their studies before. The thing they all had in common is that they were willing to work their rear end off for around a year to get the results, so if you cannot self-motivate, I wouldn't recommend measuring your success by meaningful published papers.

It might also be a good idea to have something that pays the bill before attempting it.



* Myself not included, I just chanced into a particular niche that has not been well-studied and then got paid to work on it for a year

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Pollyanna posted:

I guess my question is, what are those "wins" I need to get? What am I trying to do early on in my career to set myself up for success? Write a popular library? Manage a team or project? Become pointperson for a particular system? Just do a good job for a few years? I understand that I need to do something, but I don't know what.

Here is the thing: Nobody knows, because everyone wants something different. This is not a bad thing, as it means there are many niches you can occupy for yourself, but you have to realize that fulfilling everyone's expectations is impossible.

The best I can recommend is to select something you like doing, or are good at, and practice it. Maybe you have talent for bringing newbies up to speed, even if you are not the best swe ever. This is valuable and is a fairly marketable skill, as long as you aim at larger companies and not startups. Or maybe you have talent for extracting actionable requirements from customers, herding cats, or something else. If you have one, you should find it and practice it, so you can get hired on its strengths, but you have to also be ok with the fact that many companies are looking for someone with different strengths.


To give an example, when I market myself, there are couple of things I put in front
  • I've modernized my uni's C++ course to track current standards and best practices, taught it for couple of years and still haven't killed any of my students (the last part was the hardest ).
  • I am maintainer of fairly well-known open-source C++ library
  • I have a fairly good AI and real-time systems background (if that combination looks weird to you, you are not alone )

None of this will appeal to someone who is looking for a web-dev person, but it shows that I play well with others, can mentor more junior people without making them feel completely lovely and probably have some idea of what I am doing coding-wise.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Good Will Hrunting posted:

...
Four of us working on config files, two of which have been making concurrent changes to the nature of the way they're parsed/structured and two of us adding parameters, and it's been a loving nightmare to deal with git especially because we have these interleaved commits and cherry-picking has become a bitch.
...


Maybe your process is garbage?

Seriously though, I have no idea what version system would let you get away with this sanely. Why are you cherry-picking all over the place? Why do you have interleaved commits? If you work is so interleaved, why don't you work off single branch?

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Pollyanna posted:

I wish I put effort into things like you do, hendersa.

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Be the change you want to see in the world.



You won't just wake up one day and be knowledgeable, motivated, etc, you have to work on it.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Reading the last few posts makes me think I am weird for not using any focus enhancing drugs while coding

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I would consider myself to be a reasonably successful software developer, and I don't remotely even try to do that. Productivity isn't generated just by spending time heads-down at your desk. There are many times where I'll find myself temporarily stymied by a problem, and I get up, walk around, eat something, get some exercise, talk to a coworker, etc. and by doing so get unstuck. Whereas if I stayed at my desk and just hammered at the problem I'd make zero progress because I wasn't stepping back and looking at the larger problem as a whole.

The times I have tried to just hammer through a problem are the ones where I've produced the worst code, too, because it tends to consist of a lot of "just tweak it until it works" kind of coding and vague comments that are trying to document a system I don't really understand to begin with.

EDIT: something I will say has been a great help to me is to get a standing desk (and an anti-fatigue mat), and to do my best to use it all day -- if I need to take breaks, I just grab my laptop and do emails or docs or similar. Standing makes it easier for me to think for some reason.

Yeah, anyone actually thinking that developer is supposed to keep mashing keyboard for 8 hours a day is...

not very smart at best.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


lol, LinkedIn is my answer.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


mrmcd posted:

One of the things I did as prep for my Google interview is to implement a red-black tree from scratch.

RB trees can suck it, AVL or B-tree.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Is it actually common in USA that companies expect more? Because drat, when will you guys fix your poo poo?

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Blinkz0rz posted:

Don't fight them on the number of hours you work

As long as it is <= 40.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Its almost like the phrase "programming job" can mean an absolute gently caress ton of different areas, requirements and seriousness.

Nah, the process that does not conform to what I prefer must be crazy

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Blinkz0rz posted:

Systems language that's not c, c++, or rust.

Except it is not really systems language? When it first came out, it was marketed as such, but later it was always "build a web service in" language, rather than system one.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I guess your complaint could be better-written as "I want explicit declarations for variables" instead of variables being implicitly created the first time they are assigned to. In which case, so do I, buddy.

Who doesn't, really.

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


dat autocorrect

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


CPColin posted:

Visual Studio is loving garbage at everything it does.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Xarn
Jun 26, 2015


Jaded Burnout posted:

How many Windows developers know what Homebrew is on a mac?

IME most of the good ones. Just as they know what apt, pip, maven are, even if they do not use Linux, Python or Java.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply