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the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

am i totally out of line for asking for additional compensation for a 'remote' job that's only remote because the current dev team all prefer to work from home? i argued that they'd either be paying for office space or relocation if the job was conventional and they countered they think it's a benefit i'm not 'required' to be in an office and that other employees have given up ~20k in comp because of it

i live in one of the highest cost of living cities in north america if it matters

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the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Ithaqua posted:

Is the pay in line with typical compensation for a company in their city? If the company is based in the deep south where people live like kings on $80k salaries and you live in NYC or the like, you're totally justified in asking for compensation in line with your cost of living needs. They're totally justified in saying no.

Occasional work from home is generally considered a perk. 100% work from home is considered a huge perk. I work from home most of the time, and yes, I'm being paid about 10-15% less than I would be if I took a different job (this is backed up by declined job offers). I consider the extra 4+ hours a day of sleep/leisure time to be well worth it. I figure I'm saving at least $10k a year in commuting/laundry/clothing expenses, and the value of an extra 20+ hours of free time a week is hard to quantify.

the compensation is below market but not significantly so. they're actually located in the same city i'm located in so it's not a market disparity either. they just don't have an office for me. i can see occasional work from home being a perk but i don't have room for an office in my current place so finding my own is a significant expense. i'm not interested in cafes either. i guess if you live alone or already have a home office working remote is a perk but it's a definite drawback in my situation. i guess i'm probably not a good fit?

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Mr. Wynand posted:

So basically you can say "I am interested in the work, but I wasn't really looking for [remote work | having to drive to Pleasanton Office Park every day | working in the puppy-grinding industry] as such - so as-is this just isn't looking like a good fit unless we can work something out?". You'd say the exact same thing even if you were just asking for more money and nothing else (e.g. "I was looking for something closer to my salary expectation, which is at least $X").

this is basically what happened. they made an offer, i countered with a much higher number, they balked and i suggested we try to get creative with comp. they presented a package they thought was equivalent to my ask and i asked them how they arrived at the number. that's when they suggested me being remote was worth a sizeable chunk. i disagreed and told them i'd take less if they had an office i could work out of

i just thought it was really weird they'd present 'pay for your own office and tools!' as some kind of benefit to me

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Hadlock posted:

The position is near the Mountain View Caltrain station, so what you're saying is that as a single goon, not living in SF is social suicide? Slightly less than that one guy living in an RV at the Googolplex, but still pretty bad? The guys I talked to sounded like MV was pretty boring. One restaurant offered free swing dancing lessons near Castro Street but it seemed pretty dead by 9pm.

san jose and oakland are alternatives to san francisco if you want city living with slightly less crippling housing costs. everywhere in northern california is terrible though. if it's not too late consider looking for jobs in los angeles or seattle. slightly lower pay, infinitely better lifestyle

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Cryolite posted:

I interviewed someplace recently and received an offer that includes RSUs. This is at a privately held 40-something person company. The offer specifies an initial gift of X,XXX shares of RSUs after 90 days and that RSUs vest after a period of 3-5 years with immediate vesting after a change in control. There's no mention of how much individual shares are worth, or what the vesting schedule is like in those 3-5 years. The benefits mention that based on company/individual performance additional equity bonuses are possible, however this is not mentioned explicitly in the offer.

What should I be asking? At the very least, how much the shares are worth, right? They could be worth fractions of a penny for all I know, and the equity could be pretty worthless.

I asked the CEO during the interview if he plans to take the company public and he said no. He said once the equity vests you can sell it, however I don't understand who I'd be selling it to if it isn't public (unless it would just be selling it back to the company or other employees).

An RSU is just a promise to transfer control of shares at a future date. Sometimes they also pay dividends like regular shares but that is pretty rare. What you need to know is the vesting schedule, whether there's any equity events anticipated that could result in dilution and what happens to your grants in that case and some idea of the companies present and future value.

In your case I'd also want to ask whether an acquisition is anticipated. Unless the company goes public or is acquired by a public company it can be tough to sell stock and you may be limited to selling back to the company (generally on pretty unfavourable terms).

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

people are getting six figures with six weeks of bootcamp and no prior experience. as bad as cf is it definitely doesn't make you unhireable

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

The March Hare posted:

Also, if anyone in here happens to work with distributed stuff – any courses/books/papers/blogs/project ideas/tips/language suggestions are totally welcome.

christopher meiklejohn's
reading list is really good if you are comfortable with academic papers. there's no total ordering for the list but any of the brewer papers are good entry points

martin kleppmann has a really good book underway that covers distsys that is a great intro

as for tips, the most important thing in distsys is knowing the consistency model you need and knowing whether your system provides that model. better learn TLA+ and state model testing!

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

mrmcd posted:

I got an offer from a company today, and I'm almost certain I'm going to take it. Because of their own onboarding scheduling, I have the choice of either taking 4 weeks off or 8 weeks off.

Money isn't really a concern so having a two month vacation like a European aristocrat sounds awesome, except I'm a little bit worried I'll be bored as hell for that much time off, considering I don't have a large contingent of unemployed friends. Then again maybe this is just my American worker Stockholm syndrome talking.

Anyone taken longer-ish breaks between jobs? Was it actually relaxing and fun or after like the 4th week more like "whelp only 28 more days of daytime TV and video games!"

i took a year off between my last job and my current one. i contributed to a couple open source projects pretty heavily during that time but mostly i travelled visiting friends and family and lay on beaches. it was pretty great

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

i know a guy that was asked to implement paxos (from memory) in an interview. he had to sneak a peek at his phone to remember what the modulo operator was in the language he was using

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Eggnogium posted:

What are hiring managers first reactions to the title "Build Engineer"? A company wants to hire me to help set up their build and deployment pipeline for a new project; sounds interesting to me but not so much that I want to be pigeonholed into this area for the rest of my career. I'm coming in with four years of experience at a huge software shop, where I was working on internal build, test, deploy tooling but my title was still Software Engineer. This new job probably would involve less traditional development since it'll be reusing existing tech like Jenkins, but will still involve some plugin writing. Anyways, just wondering if I did this for a few years, it is it likely to limit me when looking for traditional development roles down the line?

this title is career death unless you want to get pigeonholed as the guy who knows how jenkins works

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Thermopyle posted:

IMO, this will always be true.

i'm leading the redesign/reimplementation of our entire data aquisition/analytics pipeline and despite some engineering challenges (global ordering of events! ramp transactions!) by far the majority of my time is spent on product and people problems. there's relatively few working programmers who can avoid that as they advance in their careers

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

i've had internal recruiters at huge companies gently caress with my cv too, a lot of internal recruiters have aggressive quotas they have to hit

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Ithaqua posted:

Doctors and lawyers have to pass significant entrance exams to practice in their fields, and gross incompetence will cause it to be revoked. There is nothing like that for us.

residents and associates are paid little enough that they are almost always worth having around if you have busy work for them to do. once they get past that stage they are all essentially contractors who only get paid if they produce

doctors and lawyers arent really comparable to programmers, except for maybe contractors

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

leper khan posted:

So the top 25% are busy swimming in their scrooge mcduck pools and the bottom 25% are better off working at walmart?

Sounds about right.

i mean when you put it like that...

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Analytic Engine posted:

As a programmer not working at the big guys:
Why aren't more people outraged at the wages of average companies? Those bonuses and stock options are insane for regular jobs. Googlers are reliably making 2x-3x our total comps while reaping untold networking & career benefits. I'm sure they're great at Compsci 101 exam questions and all but it's infuriating to know that the "market" values their work leaps and bounds above mine. Is there any rational response other than devoting huge amounts of my free time to studying Cracking the Coding Interview and breaking into the anointed-programmer club?

work for a company that values you appropriately. google and facebook are at the peak of employee comp but they are not alone there. plenty of people are making $160k-300k total comp at companies you have never heard of

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

that seems like a reasonable assignment assuming you don't have to write a distributed metadata store as part of it. if you're allowed to store metadata in postgres or dynamo or cassandra or something the criticisms seem reasonable

in two hours you should be able to throw together a basic http interface, a class/module that can read/write metadata and a stubbed out interface to the various backends. if i'd assigned that i would have been pretty happy with that result

if they expected you to write a consistent distributed db in 16 hours tho you should have just passed on the assignment and not bothered pursuing the job

the talent deficit fucked around with this message at Nov 17, 2016 around 19:21

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Good Will Hrunting posted:

Not sure if I posted this in an earlier post, but my initial solution was "Can I use a datastore?" and the answer was no. I planned on having a very simple Mongo collection.

they're just clueless then. they basically asked you to implement dynamo or paxos

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

designing data intensive systems by kleppman is a good introduction to distributed systems

learning a particular language isn't really important for distsys. most of your performance considerations are io or network, so you can write components in basically anything. tons of real world high throughput applications are glued together with python and javascript

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Good Will Hrunting posted:

Holy gently caress the spec is TWO HUNRED loving LINES.

"The challenge proposed here is to build a system which acts as a socket
server, reading events from an *event source* and forwarding them when
appropriate to *user clients*." is the gist of it.

does it specify a protocol or you just have bare tcp sockets? seems not that bad if you don't have to do any protocol level stuff

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Pollyanna posted:

Does it make sense to move on from a workplace because the work has stopped being interesting to you and you want to work on a significantly different field of study? Reason I ask is that I've been moved from being a Rails monkey for a not very interesting internal application at work, to a kind of poorly managed project that is mostly front-end design and Javascript with little opportunity for the interesting back-end/API/functional core work that I personally find more interesting, engaging, and more promising for developing my career. But the position I have right now is relatively comfortable and not very demanding, so I'm having trouble deciding between staying at a relatively stable-and-secure-but-not-very-good-for-my-development job doing random bullcrap I'm not interested in, and leaving for a less-sure-but-possibly-more-interesting-and-better-for-my-professional-development job in something that's more pointed towards building skills that are in demand for software engineers. Should I stay or should I go?

career stagnation is a really good reason to move on and smart employers would look on a candidate giving that as a reason for moving on from their last job as a positive. caveat: most employers are pretty loving dumb

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

i know an ex-goldman programmer (and he was a programmer, not a quant) whose bonus was 17 mil one year

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Iverron posted:

Hey, that's what I'm trying to do!

Speaking of which:

On a scale of 1 to 10 how desperate would you have to be to take a remote job for a company with no current remote employees? The product seems interesting but that just really feels like bad idea.

you'd need to be at 15 or 20 desperation

the only way i'd do it would be as the manager/lead for an all remote team where i had hiring input

if you go in as 'just a developer' you'll have to do amazing work to have any sort of visibility outside of your immediate manager

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Pollyanna posted:

An official from the MBTA (Boston transportation department) reached out to me asking if I wanted to work in Elixir and React with them. I gotta say the offer sounds tempting on its face, but this is a government job, and I haven't heard great things about government jobs...How much of a hassle are they to work for? Recommend or not recommend?

could it be worse than what you are doing now?

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Vulture Culture posted:

Offshoring to India for highly collaborative dev work is really weird to me. Latin America is better in every conceivable respect.

truth. i supervised a colombian shop that we retained to do our android app and they did superb work. we're giving them our iphone app now too and, if i get my way, our webapp

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Good Will Hrunting posted:

is this bad luck or am I just learning the way of software development at start-ups?

this is all pretty much de riguere

if you are lucky the founders/early employees have a strong grasp of product and are able to make intelligent decisions on what to prioritize. you may have technical debt but you at least have good answers to product questions

if you're unlucky no one really knows/cares about product and you get flippant, useless answers to product questions and you get feature requests that conflict with product constraints and other features and everything ends up grinding to a halt as you end up with an untenable code base and no one to make the decision to address technical debt that is killing velocity

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

that banned technology list looks pretty reasonable? i disagree di is bad by default, but most of the rest of the things on that list are terrible

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Ornithology posted:

I just graduated from a 2 year postgrad community college course in Canada, and the only jobs that are even offering me responses for developer positions pay 40-50k. The pay is insultingly low but I'm not sure what else I can do besides continue to gain experience. I'm making 45k now as a junior developer in my first programming job. Anyone have experience with Canadian salaries? I'm hoping for a huge bump after I get a year's experience and hopefully get a better job, but it seems like most companies here are low-balling like crazy.

where are you and what kinds of jobs are you applying for? we start new devs at $60k in toronto

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Ornithology posted:

I don't have comp sci degree though, just a post-grad college certificate in software development.

if you want i can put your cv in front of my director of eng. i'm at a startup doing analytics stuff in toronto. we mostly do python, scala and js but we're moving to kotlin and elixir. experience isn't necessary if you think you can pick any of those up relatively quickly

same goes for any other toronto area goons who are looking for jr/intermediate positions

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Skandranon posted:

Then why bother doing the lunch part at all? Just do the 4 interviews and skip the lunch if you think it is so corrupt and unreliable.

we do the lunch meeting mostly for the benefit of the candidate. they can ask questions free of worrying about how it will impact their evaluation and they can possibly decide to bail on the process if they think the position would be a bad fit for them

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Pollyanna posted:

Looking at non-frontend jobs these days, and I got to wondering: if Rails isn't the new back-end hotness these days, what do most people write their back-ends in now? I've moved on to either Clojure or Elixir (i.e. Phoenix) for back-ends and APIs in my personal projects, but those aren't as popular as I expected them to be. Are Python/Django and Java big players now?

There's also Node, but...it's Node.

it's always been java and it always will be. maybe kotlin if you're lucky

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

anytime someone tells you ml is gonna replace some job function ask them why that job hasn't already been offshored if it's so easy to reduce it to input -> some stuff happens -> output

modern ml is mostly going to make things that are of very low economic value feasible, it's not gonna replace highly paid professionals. we already do that where we can with indian and chinese labour

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Blinkz0rz posted:

For folks who have gone from IC to management, two questions:

1. What was the thing you wish you had done first?

2. What was the most important skill you needed/wished you had during that transition?

1. turned down the position

2. scheduling. i went from 3 or 4 meetings a week as a team lead to 20+ meetings a week as a manager. it was overwhelming and i struggled to make effective use of my non-meeting time

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Skandranon posted:

I'm mostly concerned for some of the junior developers I've mentored, and how this will affect them, I don't particularly care about the business stakeholders.

just give them your non-work contact info (twitter handle, phone number, personal email, whatever) and tell them to reach out if they need a reference or referral or career advice. they'll know what that means

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

your evaluation probably had more to do with being remote than anything else. a lot of companies are willing to hire remote employees but are unwilling to support remote employees. i'd never take a remote position unless the team i was joining was majority also remote and the company had a track record of success with remote employees

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

boulder has ridiculous cost of living (comparable to seattle/los angeles). if you don't mind commuting longmont is pretty reasonable tho

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Pollyanna posted:

It would have been 12-8, not 10-6. Also long hours were common, so if Cali went til 10 it would have gone til 1 for me.

Also the appropriate response would have been to talk to me about it and ask “is there a way you can adjust your schedule to fit ours” rather than just giving up on it altogether.

why did you take the job without discussing working hours?

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

remote teams are generally more functional than all-local teams in my experience. this is probably because the average experience level is higher for remote workers (companies are more likely to trust competent devs with a track record to work remote than new hires) but i also think it's because practices you have to adopt for remote teams are just better for development overall. documenting, async discussion and automation are all way more critical for remote teams than they are when you can just walk over to a coworkers desk

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

big 4 hiring standards aren't that much higher than the rest of the industry. they can afford to be a little more choosy because they typically pay more but they draw from the same hiring pool as everyone else

the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

feedmegin posted:

That's...pretty stark. Are women scared of the Great Frontier or something?

military bases

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the talent deficit
Dec 20, 2003

self-deprecation is a very british trait, and problems can arise when the british attempt to do so with a foreign culture







College Slice

Pollyanna posted:

Well, they said they had to lock in the number before they could forward my resume 'n stuff (yeah, I know), so I asked for a particular $$/hr. Now I'm wondering how much of that $$/hr goes specifically to me, and that's what I'll be asking them about.

as far as you're concerned this is just a normal job except you have to tie work done to particular contracts/customers. if you asked for $50/hr you'll get $2k a week regardless of how many of your hours you actually bill (but you'll probably get fired if you're not billing above average hours for the week)

(if this isn't the deal, run away)

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