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Lurdiak
Feb 25, 2006

I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people that do.




Skwirl posted:

I know, like holy poo poo. Also, just the concept of Daredevil breaking bad is great and clearly what a lot of both Bendis and Brubaker's writing was building to.

Yeah, part of the problem was that instead of exploring the consequences of that it immediately turned into demon ninja schlock with Matt being possessed, those things probably should've been separate. But even if it had to be that way it was done badly and boringly.

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Skwirl
May 13, 2007

The 'blood babe with the silicone chest, 200-dollar haircut, and a closet full of the latest fashions.




Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

Thank you! I love validation almost as much as I love Daredevil.


To be fair, I haven't even read most of the '90s Daredevil stuff. When I had Marvel Unlimited, I tried some of it, but the art and layouts (by Scott McDaniel?) were honestly giving me a headache. I'd be curious about any good stuff I missed between Nocenti (who went even darker and more hosed-up than Miller) and Bendis. But I think Miller, Nocenti, Bendis, Brubaker, Waid, Soule, and Zdarsky have to outweigh any '90s crap or the disappointment of Shadowland. (Notice I didn't include Kevin Smith in with the good writers either.) Can you think of any other Marvel books that have had that many good writers for that many long runs from the '80s to the present? I sure can't.

I mean, X-Men and Spider-Man. The issue is there's probably more terrible Spider-Man and X-Men writing than terrible Daredevil writing because they were both so popular they had more than one book coming out a month for most of the last 40 years.

GOD IS BED
Jun 17, 2010

ALL HAIL GOD MAMMON




College Slice

Simon Hanselmann's CRISIS ZONE just ended. https://www.instagram.com/simon.hanselmann/ Start at March 13 for the ride of your life.

Chin Strap
Nov 24, 2002

I failed my TFLC Toxx, but I no longer need a double chin strap

Pillbug

GOD IS BED posted:

Simon Hanselmann's CRISIS ZONE just ended. https://www.instagram.com/simon.hanselmann/ Start at March 13 for the ride of your life.

Guess I'm waiting until August for the collection because I'll be damned if I can tolerate reading a giant loving comic in that format.

Waltzing Along
Jun 14, 2008

There's only one
Human race
Many faces
Everybody belongs here

I read The Boys and thought it was fantastic. Probably the best comic series I've ever read. I grabbed the first volume of Preacher as that seemed like a natural spot to go next.

What else is up there with The Boys in terms of quality?

site
Apr 6, 2007

Trans pride, Worldwide
Bitch


The one where eminem does the face while he fucks you in the rear end

site fucked around with this message at 21:11 on Dec 24, 2020

GOD IS BED
Jun 17, 2010

ALL HAIL GOD MAMMON




College Slice

Waltzing Along posted:

I read The Boys and thought it was fantastic. Probably the best comic series I've ever read. I grabbed the first volume of Preacher as that seemed like a natural spot to go next.

What else is up there with The Boys in terms of quality?

Ennis is kinda hit or miss with a lot of people. I love him, and would recommend his Punisher Max run. His 616 Punisher run and his Hitman book at DC are good and similar in theme to The Boys: taking the piss out of superheroes; but they aren't as polished as The Boys.

Gaz-L
Jan 28, 2009


site posted:

The one where eminem does the face while he fucks you in the rear end

As much as I dislike them both, Ennis is much better than Millar. God, I hate Wanted. I'm actually mad my best friend from uni bought me it when I said I needed to read it for that dumb toxx thread a year or two back.

A Good Time
Dec 20, 2015




Chin Strap posted:

Guess I'm waiting until August for the collection because I'll be damned if I can tolerate reading a giant loving comic in that format.

Someone reposted it in the BYOB webcomics thread. for crudely drawn cartoon... everything

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Waltzing Along posted:

I read The Boys and thought it was fantastic. Probably the best comic series I've ever read. I grabbed the first volume of Preacher as that seemed like a natural spot to go next.

What else is up there with The Boys in terms of quality?

I'm not an Ennis fan myself, but I think you'll like Hitman if you liked The Boys.

Another possibility is Marshal Law, which is superhero satire like The Boys, although broader and more cartoonishly violent.

Madkal
Feb 11, 2008

It was all going well, and then the parademons showed up


Fallen Rib

Selachian posted:

I'm not an Ennis fan myself, but I think you'll like Hitman if you liked The Boys.

Another possibility is Marshal Law, which is superhero satire like The Boys, although broader and more cartoonishly violent.

Going to second Marshal Law if you want heroes are all pervy fascists. If you want the exact polar how is this even in the same medium of that opposite check out Astro City. It's another world populated by superheroes but instead of being nihilistically cynical it is pretty hopeful and great.

Waltzing Along
Jun 14, 2008

There's only one
Human race
Many faces
Everybody belongs here

Selachian posted:

I'm not an Ennis fan myself, but I think you'll like Hitman if you liked The Boys.

Another possibility is Marshal Law, which is superhero satire like The Boys, although broader and more cartoonishly violent.

Thanks. The superhero part of the boys isn't what really got me, though. I'm glad I had some background so I knew what was being lampooned. It's really just the fact that the story was written explicitly for adults who had some idea of life outside the superhero genre, especially in regards to politics. That plus the relatively developed characters.

FWIW, other comics that I had previously read that really stuck out as being something above the norm were Shadowman when it was done by Bob Hall? and Justice League America/Europe during the early 90s resurgence w/ Guy Gardner and Blue Beetle and all that. Oh, and the Peter David Hulk run was really good.

Obviously, I picked up the TB after watching the show. I was curious what the source material would be like and was fairly blown away by just how hosed up it was in comparison, basically constantly. It's funny, nearly everything about the show, IMO, pales in comparison with the comic. I can't stand Butcher on the show but in the comic I liked him up until the finale storyline.

Skwirl
May 13, 2007

The 'blood babe with the silicone chest, 200-dollar haircut, and a closet full of the latest fashions.




Waltzing Along posted:

I can't stand Butcher on the show

What?

Waltzing Along
Jun 14, 2008

There's only one
Human race
Many faces
Everybody belongs here


I don't like him on the show. Is that so hard to believe? A character that goes out of his way to be unlikable has people who don't like him.

hadji murad
Apr 18, 2006


How is Wonder Woman Rebirth after Greg Rucka? I notice there are a few different writers.

Gaz-L
Jan 28, 2009


hadji murad posted:

How is Wonder Woman Rebirth after Greg Rucka? I notice there are a few different writers.

*dashes into thread breathless*

OK, so, the filler arc right after Rucka is fine, if unspectacular in my eyes, has some nice stuff that hints at the 'shouldn't Wolverine donate blood/organs 24/7 forever and that'd be more useful' line of thinking which is always a dicey proposition. James Robinson's run is... very competently done, and very wrongheaded in what it sets out to do, in my eyes. Diana constantly has to be saved by male family members throughout, her retconned-in twin brother is the special snowflake who is the real hero for most of it and it's just basically clear Robinson has no clue how to tell a story where women are the driving force.
G Willow WIlson's run is one I like more and more the more distance I have from my first reading. She has a nice dry sense of humour, and I feel like she had some long term threads that were cut short by DC's line-wide events at the time. And there's an interesting, if subtle, refocusing of the character back to Golden Age roots in a way.
Steve Orlando comes off to me a bit like Dan Slott or Nick Spencer, a 'look at all the obscure lore I know and can show off' manner that is hit or miss. His first issue is a done-in-one that's absolutely excellent and he does some nice work reintegrating the Amazons and Boston back into Diana's world, but not sure how I feel about his attempt to do a Wonder Woman Sinister Six type thing.
And finally the just-concluded Mariko Tamaki run was... disappointing. I've loved her work over at Marvel generally, and I really hope her Detective Comics run is cool, but this felt like an editorially mandated 'make it kinda like the movie so the trades are on shelves while the movie is on streaming in theatres on streaming" and it just feels very uninspired with a new villain who has what should be a tragic backstory, but we don't get enough of a sense of who they are before the turn to really care.

Gaz-L fucked around with this message at 21:52 on Dec 25, 2020

hadji murad
Apr 18, 2006


Sounds like a mixed bag. Starman is my favourite thing ever but nothing else of his has really clicked. Middling Wonder Woman seems like something I can skip. Iíll give Wilsonís run a shot since I loved Mz Marvel so much. Thanks for the detailed answer!

Gaz-L
Jan 28, 2009


Orlando's probably worth a shot at least, as well. He's at the very least got a story direction he wants to go and has a decent understanding of the character, just certain story beats didn't land so well for me. He certainly seems to be the run that has the most impact of what's happening with the Future State/Infinite Horizon stuff. Plus I gotta give him props for being willing to engage with Donna Troy, which most other writers are steering a wide berth around the Wonder Girls because they don't want to deal with the continuity quagmire.

fadam
Apr 23, 2008



Can you guys recommend anything similar to Simon Hanselmann's Megg and Mogg collections? I thought they were really funny and I liked all the dumb stoner stuff.

How Wonderful!
Jul 18, 2006


I only have excellent ideas.


fadam posted:

Can you guys recommend anything similar to Simon Hanselmann's Megg and Mogg collections? I thought they were really funny and I liked all the dumb stoner stuff.

Matt Furie's Boy's Club hits the same kind of stoner comedy notes for me and Michelle Perez' graphic novel The Pervert reminded me of a lot of Hanselmann's more somber and serious beats.

Hanselmann was also really influenced by the Fort Thunder and Paper Rad collectives, I think primarily Ben Jones? Hanselmann has also mentioned Peter Bagge as a big thing in the background which kind of surprised me but over time yeah, I think HATE in particular is really simpatico with all the Megg/Mogg/Owl stuff and if you like one you might like the other.

Edit: Oh yeah, maybe you're already aware of this but if you've just been reading the collections Hanselmann just finished up a really long serial story on Instagram called "Crisis Zone." I think it's his best work ever so check it out if you haven't yet?

Oh, it took me a minute to remember her name but when I first ran into Hanselmann's work I thought oh this reminds me of Cate Wurtz. I don't know how true that is or if any of her stuff has held up because I haven't really looked at it in years but I think the two are kind of working in the same general emotional neighborhood.

How Wonderful! fucked around with this message at 02:10 on Dec 29, 2020

Retro Futurist
Aug 8, 2007

Yesterday's Tomorrow,
Today!




Drunken Bakers is probably the closest thing I've ever seen

fadam
Apr 23, 2008



How Wonderful! posted:

Matt Furie's Boy's Club hits the same kind of stoner comedy notes for me and Michelle Perez' graphic novel The Pervert reminded me of a lot of Hanselmann's more somber and serious beats.

Hanselmann was also really influenced by the Fort Thunder and Paper Rad collectives, I think primarily Ben Jones? Hanselmann has also mentioned Peter Bagge as a big thing in the background which kind of surprised me but over time yeah, I think HATE in particular is really simpatico with all the Megg/Mogg/Owl stuff and if you like one you might like the other.

Edit: Oh yeah, maybe you're already aware of this but if you've just been reading the collections Hanselmann just finished up a really long serial story on Instagram called "Crisis Zone." I think it's his best work ever so check it out if you haven't yet?

Oh, it took me a minute to remember her name but when I first ran into Hanselmann's work I thought oh this reminds me of Cate Wurtz. I don't know how true that is or if any of her stuff has held up because I haven't really looked at it in years but I think the two are kind of working in the same general emotional neighborhood.

Thanks!

Gameko
Feb 23, 2006

The friend of all children!

Action Jacktion posted:

There's a 1200-page omnibus of all the comics that came packed in with the figures. They can follow their own mythology and aren't too connected with the cartoon:

ISBN 9781616558772

I wanted to come back in and say thanks for this. I had no idea something like this was in print. And only 9.99 for kindle/comixology...

In some ways I miss dead tree comics but it's so nice to read them on my ipad...

RadicalTranslation
Jan 26, 2021



I'm currently working through post-crisis DC stuff. Can anyone recommend me the best runs here between 1986-2000 besides the obvious stuff? AKA hidden gems

Madkal
Feb 11, 2008

It was all going well, and then the parademons showed up


Fallen Rib

RadicalTranslation posted:

I'm currently working through post-crisis DC stuff. Can anyone recommend me the best runs here between 1986-2000 besides the obvious stuff? AKA hidden gems

Anything by Ostrander (Suicide Squad and Spectre). I am a sucker for Batman and really enjoyed the Moench/Jones/Beaty run.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



RadicalTranslation posted:

I'm currently working through post-crisis DC stuff. Can anyone recommend me the best runs here between 1986-2000 besides the obvious stuff? AKA hidden gems

Ostrander's Suicide Squad. Okay, that's probably one of the obvious ones, but still. Ostrander also did an excellent Deadshot miniseries during that era, and his revival of Manhunter with his wife, Kim Yale, is worth checking out. And if you can look past the continuity hell it introduced, Hawkworld is a pretty good read. And there's Spectre too. Basically, read Ostrander. (Okay, his work on Firestorm is kinda skippable.)

Another obvious choice, but one I feel I have to point out: O'Neil and Cowan's Question.

Speaking of miniseries from that era, definitely take a look at Phil Foglio's Plastic Man, Neal Pozner's Aquaman, and Matt Wagner's Demon.

Which reminds me, the post-Zero Hour Demon series by Alan Grant was pretty fun too.

Power of the Atom was one of the Atom's better books, and likewise The Power of Shazam! for Captain Marvel.

Even if you don't want to get tangled in Legion continuity, the Great Darkness Saga is worth a look.

And it's at the very end of the range, but for my money Walt Simonson's Orion is the best non-Kirby treatment of the New Gods.

For non-DCU stuff, try the regrettably short Helfer/Sienkiewicz/Baker run on The Shadow.

Selachian fucked around with this message at 05:22 on Jan 26, 2021

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


RadicalTranslation posted:

I'm currently working through post-crisis DC stuff. Can anyone recommend me the best runs here between 1986-2000 besides the obvious stuff? AKA hidden gems

Some of these are probably pretty obvious, but others, much less so:

James Robinson's Starman, as well as The Shade miniseries
James Robinson's The Golden Age miniseries
Matt Wagner and Steven Seagle's Sandman Mystery Theatre
John Ostrander and Len Wein's Legends miniseries, which led directly into:
Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis' Justice League (#1-6) --> Justice League International (#7-25) --> Justice League America (#26-60) and Justice League Europe (#1-36; ran concurrently starting with Justice League America #26 and often crossed over)
John Ostrander's Suicide Squad, as well as the excellent Deadshot miniseries
Len Strazewski's Justice Society of America (an 8-issue miniseries that's set in the 1950s, followed by a 10-issue series set in the current DCU of the early '90s)
Alan Moore's WildC.A.T.s (#21-34 and #50) -- Wildstorm is part of the DCU now!
Matt Wagner's two Batman/Grendel miniseries

If you're willing to continue through the 2000s and stop at the New 52 reboot in 2011:
Darwyn Cooke's DC: The New Frontier miniseries
Ed Brubaker's Catwoman (particular #1-24, although he wrote it until #37)
Greg Rucka and Ed Brubaker's Gotham Central
John Francis Moore's Chronos
Marc Andreyko's Manhunter
Dan Curtis Johnson and J.H. Williams III's Chase
Rick Veitch's The Question miniseries
Christos Gage's Deadshot: Bulletproof miniseries
Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, and Mark Waid's 52
Geoff Johns' Booster Gold (#1-6, 0, 7-10, and 1,000,000), and the Dan Jurgens run that followed wasn't bad either
Gail Simone's Villains United miniseries, which led into Secret Six (all good stuff)
Keith Giffen and Judd Winick's Justice League: Generation Lost
Joe Casey's Wildcats (series 2 #8-28 and Wildcats 3.0 #1-24) -- Wildstorm is part of the DCU now!
Ed Brubaker's Point Blank and Sleeper -- Wildstorm is part of the DCU now!
Andy Diggle and Jock's The Losers (which inspired the very underrated action movie) -- Vertigo series that isn't part of the DCU, but it kicks rear end!

Endless Mike
Aug 13, 2003

Get running
Start pumping your bunions, I'm coming
I'm the dumbest, who flamethrow your function to Funyons
Flame your crew quicker than Trump fucks his youngest
Now face the flame fuckers your fame and fate's done with





I haven't read it myself, but am I wrong in remembering that the Marc Andreyko Manhunter series was pretty well-regarded?

E: Oh I didn't see it tucked into the middle in the above post lol

The Power Girl series after Infinite Crisis was fun.
Shadowpact at least started out okay.

Endless Mike fucked around with this message at 13:26 on Jan 26, 2021

Dejan Bimble
Mar 24, 2008

we're all black friends


Plaster Town Cop

I did my annual dip in and read Matt Lesniewski's Crimson Flower #1 and Copra 38, that was good poo poo. Anything individually stylish and kinetic like that anyone could recommend?

I also read TMNT Jennika II 03, and the action flow from panel to panel was great, I didn't expect that at all. This one might be subjective, but any recommendation for seamless and thrilling fights without necessarily needing to be singularly illustrative and all that?

Uthor
Jul 9, 2006

Gummy Bear Heaven ... It's where I go when the world is too mean.

Head Lopper is one of the most recent comics I've dug that's pure action.

Dejan Bimble
Mar 24, 2008

we're all black friends


Plaster Town Cop

Uthor posted:

Head Lopper is one of the most recent comics I've dug that's pure action.

This is really cool, thank you

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


I got the black and white Showcase collection of All-Star Squadron as an interlibrary loan, because I've loved the Golden Age heroes most or my life, ever since reading about them in Who's Who as a kid... and then being shocked by how they were written off in Last Days of the Justice Society of America. James Robinson, Matt Wagner, and even Geoff Johns made me love these classic characters even more.

But this is hard to read, folks. Between the black and white reproduced art on cheap newsprint and Roy Thomas writing in the most hackneyed Silver Age style ever (in 1981!), this book is going to be a slog. I'm so glad I didn't buy it!

RadicalTranslation
Jan 26, 2021



Big Bad Voodoo Lou posted:

I got the black and white Showcase collection of All-Star Squadron as an interlibrary loan, because I've loved the Golden Age heroes most or my life, ever since reading about them in Who's Who as a kid... and then being shocked by how they were written off in Last Days of the Justice Society of America. James Robinson, Matt Wagner, and even Geoff Johns made me love these classic characters even more.

But this is hard to read, folks. Between the black and white reproduced art on cheap newsprint and Roy Thomas writing in the most hackneyed Silver Age style ever (in 1981!), this book is going to be a slog. I'm so glad I didn't buy it!

I bought the Legion of Super Heroes showcase presents vol. 1 last year and started to read it.

I'm enjoying it so far and have been looking into buying more of these. Do people feel like the black and white makes the experience of these tpbs that much worse?

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


RadicalTranslation posted:

I bought the Legion of Super Heroes showcase presents vol. 1 last year and started to read it.

I'm enjoying it so far and have been looking into buying more of these. Do people feel like the black and white makes the experience of these tpbs that much worse?

I'd rather have the opportunity to read these old comics than NOT read them (at least theoretically), but the B&W art doesn't do them any favors. At least I know what all the All-Star Squadron characters are supposed to look like in color. To date, I've read all ten B&W Savage Dragon Archives volumes, which means I've inflicted *250* issues of Savage Dragon upon myself. Especially during the action scenes, it is hard to tell what's happening at all times and who is doing what to who without color. And except for seeing tiny color thumbnails of the covers of the 25 issues in each volume on the back cover, I realized I don't know what many of the characters look like in color.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou fucked around with this message at 06:12 on Jan 30, 2021

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

I didn't realize that the Firefly (as in Serenity, not the Batman villain) comics were written by Greg Pak. Worth a read, then? I just found out because I caught wind that in the latest issue, there's been a time jump, crew is split up, Mal is missing, Kaylee's captain, and there's also gonna be a parallel comic running that jumps even further ahead with Zoe's daughter as the new captain. All that sounded interesting so I looked up the creative teams; Greg Pak is on the main Firefly comic and I think the other one is a newcomer.

Skwirl
May 13, 2007

The 'blood babe with the silicone chest, 200-dollar haircut, and a closet full of the latest fashions.




I can't speak to Firefly, but I've never read a Greg Pak comic and regretted it later.

Vorik
Mar 27, 2014



e - nevermind

Vincent
Nov 25, 2005





Dejan Bimble posted:

I did my annual dip in and read Matt Lesniewski's Crimson Flower #1 and Copra 38, that was good poo poo. Anything individually stylish and kinetic like that anyone could recommend?
The Luther Strode Saga (The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, The Legend of Luther Strode, The Legacy of Luther Strode) by Justin Jordan, Tradd Moore and Felipe Sobreiro. Tradd Moore is at the top of the "action" artist right now, along with Yusuke Murata, in my opinion.

Orc Stain by James Stokoe is also a good comic, but I don't remember if Stokoe ever finished the series.

Endless Mike
Aug 13, 2003

Get running
Start pumping your bunions, I'm coming
I'm the dumbest, who flamethrow your function to Funyons
Flame your crew quicker than Trump fucks his youngest
Now face the flame fuckers your fame and fate's done with





Yeah, Tradd Moore is definitely "stylish and kinetic." The Silver Surfer: Black series also has art by him, and while the story is.....maybe not so great, it sure looks pretty!

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El Gallinero Gros
Mar 17, 2010



I loved All New Wolverine, is the Mariko Tamaki series good if I want more?

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