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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Which writer is responsible for inventing the Speed Force as a concept?

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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


That's actually quite surprising. It doesn't seem that recent.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I think it's pretty rare for editors to mandate a character death. I guess the biggest example is Jean Grey.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Waterhaul posted:

Originally Jean was supposed to survive the Dark Phoenix and have a normal life with Scott but editorial thought her charter was gone beyond saving for blowing up a planet as Phoenix so the story was changed to her dying.

Yes, I believe Claremont wrote the scene with the intention that the planet would be uninhabited and Lilandra was going after her because she could have destroyed a populated planet, but when Byrne drew it he added in some aliens who ended up getting wiped out. It didn't sit well with Shooter.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


zoux posted:

So is that the reason Shooter and Byrne had mad beef? Sounds like he had beef with Claremont too.

Later on, Byrne wrote an issue of Fantastic Four where Reed Richards saves Galactus's life. When Claremont heard about it he was a bit put out because Galactus had caused far more destruction than Phoenix did, and included a scene in an issue of Uncanny where Lilandra hears about this and zaps into the Baxter Building to warn Reed that he's in trouble. Byrne was upset because he thought it would make a mess of his immediate plans so he went to complain to Shooter, who told him to sort it out himself, so he ended up writing "The Trial of Reed Richards" story.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Alien Rope Burn posted:

Shooter has defended his Hulk story where Bruce Banner gets threatened with surprise sex at the Y by a pair of homosexual men as not being intended as homophobic, but YMMV. Most of the assertions for Marvel's ban on LBGT during Shooter go back to an interview titled "One Thin Dime an' Two Thick Pennies" from a fanzine called Thwack! However, I can't find any traces of it on the internet - anybody know where one might find a copy of that interview or fanzine?

I think Shooter's given mixed signals on gay characters. On the one hand, he's talked about how he always assumed Element Lad was gay when he was writing the Legion and one of his unrealised plans for a Valiant book was the main character realising that he's gay and subsequently coming out, both of which are fairly neutral examples.

But then there's stuff like the Hulk story.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Originally, she was introduced by Claremont as the alternate future child of Doom and Sue. Then during the subsequent Pacheco/Marín/Loeb run she was retconned into being the baby Sue miscarried back during Byrne's run who had been plucked out of time by Franklin and placed in the alternate future where Sue and Doom raised her. In their last story she was regressed to a foetus and put back in Sue's womb, and she was subsequently delivered by Doom in the very short Adam Warren/Mark Bagley run that immediately preceded Waid's arrival. I think it all falls under Marvel's "it happened, but we don't talk about it any more" policy regarding continuity.

vv

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Waid subsequently revealed that it was all part of a scheme to make her into his magical familiar.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


It should come as a surprise to absolutely no-one that he originally wanted to make Kitty Pryde a regular character (as Franklin's new live-in governess), but then Excalibur ended and she was put back in the X-Men so he had to come up with something else.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Senor Candle posted:

I thought X-Men #1 was the best selling comic of all time.

I believe the top two are X-Men #1 and X-Force #1.

That being said, even though I was about two at the time, everything I've seen suggests that "The Death of Superman" was probably the bigger "event" in terms of popular consciousness.

If I recall correctly, there's a bit in Sean Howe's book where he discusses a scene from the Marvel bullpen in either the mid- or late-1990s where a bunch of editors are lamenting how the comic industry must be collapsing because one of their books had fallen below half a million copies shifted a month (granted, I may have imagined that or made it up).

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Edge & Christian posted:

There's no way there were ever 1.75 million people reading Turok, and stories abound of people who bought CASES of various hot comics and salted them away to make a fortune.

I'm not sure what's more bemusing; that people were convinced their holofoil special edition copy of Youngblood #1 or whatever was going to be worth millions of dollars, or that some of them still do.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Random Stranger posted:

This is the kind of thing that made sense in the 1960's but I wonder if he can read glossy printed magazines created with modern technology. I would think that would all feel the same to him.

There was a Waid interview maybe a year or so into his run where he commented on this skill; he said it's not much use when so much stuff seems to be on tablets and smartphones and so on nowadays.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I think Seanbaby did a parody comic about that a few years ago.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Can anyone tell me if Geoff Johns's JSA was ever the best-selling overall series during its run?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I ought to have mentioned, I asked because I was checking out the omnibus on Amazon and the product description claims it was number-one when Johns was writing it, and that didn't strike me as being particularly likely.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I made a mistake; it's the page for volume two on the UK site.

amazon.co.uk posted:

Known for his groundbreaking work on Green Lantern, over a decade ago Geoff Johns brought Justice Society of America characters rooted in the Golden Age of comics back to the forefront of comics. Mixing younger, edgier characters with the elder statesmen of superheroes, Johns brought the JSA back to the forefront of the comics in what became the industry's best-selling comic series. Collected here is the second and concluding volume on Johns' now-legendary run on the original JSA.

Collected here are JSA #26-81.

Looks like they're leaving out the Hawkman crossovers, and probably a bunch of other stuff as well. I wouldn't be surprised if they amended the contents closer to the release date like they did with the first one.

I've actually pre-ordered vol. 1 from SpeedyHen, because it's only £48 there while it's £95 on Amazon.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Teenage Fansub posted:

How was Johns' JSA run? Is that omnibus going to be a good read?

I like it a lot and I'd recommend the omnibus. It was the first DC comic I was really into.

James Robinson wrote the first half dozen or so issues and I understand there's a lot of Starman influence in the series which is retained after he leaves (I've not read much Starman, but that's the comparison I often hear). One thing I've never been quite as sure about is the extent of the contribution David S. Goyer makes. Even when he's credited as co-writer it seems like an all Johns show.

bobkatt013 posted:

You gotta love family massacres. I a trying to think has Bendis ever done a mass slaughter on a John's scale?

I guess there was Alpha Flight, but that happened off-panel.

To be honest, I'm not really sure why Johns has such a predilection for violence for a guy who's so enamoured of the Silver Age.

It seems lke something he only started doing... after Goyer left! I've answered my own question!

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


sleepingbuddha posted:

You should read Starman.

Oh, I've certainly been meaning to, but it looks like you can only get the first half of the omniboo in paperbacks and the second half in hardcover, and I'd prefer to read them all in the same format. I'm hoping DC will re-collect it in some form at some point, hopefully sooner rather than later (though I guess there's probably not much demand if they only did the first two in paperback).

It is kind of odd how it always shows on lists of the best superhero comics of all time, but with the exception of The Golden Age, the rest of James Robinson's stuff seems to provoke mixed reactions at best.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I believe the popular story is that Heller was challenged by someone who said he'd never written anything as good as Catch-22, and his response was, "Who has?"

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


According to this article, he was originally going to be an older version of Cannonball.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


CapnAndy posted:

Invincible is frequently pretty good, but the problem is that every so often Kirkman gets bored with good writing and decides to just coat every page in entrails and eyeballs and any other viscera he can think of and kill off a bunch of good characters.

I like Invincible in general as well as most of the various spin-off and satellite series Kirkman wrote before and during that comic's run, such as Tech Jacket, Capes, Inc. and The Astoudning Wolf-Man (although I certainly understand the criticism it gets). In a certain sense, I guess I can appreciate that he's been able to construct his very own superhero universe and he can more or less do what he likes with it.

I admit it's kind of weird that I like it (and probably more than a little hypocritical of me) because when the Big Two publish books with really viscreal ultra-violence (and often much less viscreal depictions than one might see in Invincible) it would often put me off.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


What all did Kirkman write at Marvel? He had a pretty poor run on Ultimate X-Men, he did one of the short, fairly anonymous Captain America runs in between Jurgens leaving and Brubaker taking over, and he had the new Marvel Team-Up he did with Scott Kolins (which was okay up to a point). What else?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


And Marvel Zombies, of course. No idea how I forgot that one.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I think there's one in SA Mart.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


zoux posted:

Aside from Superman, how many comic book heroes/villians have had a nuclear bomb dropped on them? How many survived?

I've heard that Luke Cage survived a nuclear blast in Age of Ultron, but I haven't read the comic in question myself.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


TwoPair posted:

Captain Marvel. Hell the whole Marvel family.

Wasn't Captain Marvel was killed by a bunch of nuclear missiles in Kingdom Come?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Something Else posted:

Is there a character responsible for making superhero costumes? I know a lot of characters make their own or whatever, but I'm picturing something like a "cosmic tailor" and I'm wondering if such a character already exists.

Not quite the same thing, but there was one guy from JMS Spider-Man who fixed superhero costumes. There's one panel where Doom shows up at his shop to get his cape fixed, and at the end he passes Peter the design for a "Spider-Man of the future" outfit which sees use in (I think) the "Happy Birthday" story.

Various issues of Fantastic Four explain that Reed licences unstable molecules to other teams to make costumes and Giant-Size X-Men #1, Professor X says he made the all-new, all-different team's uniforms with them.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Does the Silver Age end when Jack Kirby left Marvel in 1970, or when he left DC in 1975?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I tend to associate the proper start of the Bronze Age with Claremont taking over on X-Men, but I guess I'd forgotten about O'Neil and Adams on GL/GA.

Is there a clear dividing line between the Bronze Age and Dark Age? It seems pretty nebulous to me; I know it's usually listed as Watchmen and TDKR but I'm not sure if I'm entirely convinced.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


True, it's never clearly defined, and each "age" often means pretty different things for each of the Big Two (a Silver Age DC comic and a Silver Age Marvel comic are often going to be pretty different things).

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


A couple of years ago, the guys who do the War Rocket Ajax podcast on Comics Alliance (and the site's editor) reviewed the ten comics Dan DiDio ranked as the most important of his first decade in charge of DC, and one term they used to describe the 2000s as the "Prismatic Age". I believe the reasoning was that a lot of writers are looking back to the Silver Age for inspiration, but they're doing so through the lens of the Dark Age. Identity Crisis was their big example.

It's an interesting idea but I'm not sure how well it holds up.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


As far as "canonical" goes, I'm fairly sure it's Angel: After the Fall -> Bufy Season 8 -> Buffy Season 9 and Angel & Faith -> Buffy Season 10 (and I think there's another Angel & Faith series coming out.

To the best of my knowledge, the other comics (i.e. those published during the series' TV run and in the gap between the series and Season 8) aren't necessarily considered "canon", but I don't know what the official policy in that regard is.

I think some of Brian Lynch's Spike comics are canonical, but I haven't read them. I don't know what the official word on IDW's Angel comics post-ATF is, but I understand they're not terribly well-regarded.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I'm not sure how I forgot about Fray.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I believe Guggenheim used to be a lawyer before he went into comics, didn't he?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I think in some versions he's learned Kryptonian martial arts. I might mistaken, though.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


The Question IRL posted:

"Great Scott! The only way for me to defeat Titanio is to use my Super-Cow Tipping powers."

Next issue: Superman must tap into the ancestral Smallville art of making Moon-shine to take out Black Adam!

It had to happen! The Superman/Terra Man team-up you've all been waiting for! Because you demanded it!

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


muscles like this? posted:

Wasn't there someone else who had adamantium reinforcements too?

Sabretooth once had a full adamantium skeleton because he shares Wolverine's healing factor. In fact when Wolverine lost his adamantium, Apocalypse gave it to Sabretooth then made Wolverine right him to get it back (it was the time Wolverine was replaaced by a Skrull who was killed by Apocalypse's horseman Death, who was actually the real Wolverine, because it was the 1990s).

I think Hammerhead sometimes has an adamantium plate in his skull.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I believe Brubaker himself admitted he wasn't the best fit for the title.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


OldTennisCourt posted:

I always thought that the basic idea of Onslaught was kind of interesting, the fact that he's the worst aspects of Prof. X and Magneto fused together, but I guess it's just another lovely 90's MEGA EVENT comic.

I'm pretty sure the entire creative process for Onslaught was Scott Lobdell thinking it would be really cool if there was a bad guy who could punch Juggernaut from California to New Jersey.

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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Rhyno posted:

Until Geoff Johns got his hands on him.

Did Johns not come up with the idea of him developing Kryptonian powers, or did that start sooner?

I know he came up with the idea that Superboy also had Luthor's DNA based on a fan theory he'd had years before he got into comics.

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