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Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Uncle Boogeyman posted:

Wait, DC is no longer doing the archive editions? That's a bit disappointing. I have the Golden Age Hawkman one and it's great, I've been meaning to snag the Dr. Fate and Charlton Action Heroes ones.

If you're interested, I have Action Heroes Archives Volume 2, which includes all the Ditko Blue Beetle and Question stories as well as the rest of his Captain Atom.

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Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Something Else posted:

Is there a character responsible for making superhero costumes? I know a lot of characters make their own or whatever, but I'm picturing something like a "cosmic tailor" and I'm wondering if such a character already exists.

Over at DC, Paul Gambi was the tailor who made all the costumes for Flash's Rogues.

EDIT: This may have been retconned in the New 52 to make Gambi a guy who stitches together costumes out of human skin.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


zoux posted:

Is there a comprehensive Authority omnibus or just trades?
There is a Warren Ellis Authority hardcover with his full run, #1-12, and a Mark Millar hardcover with his full run, #13-29 (which I guess also includes the Tom Peyer fill-in arc in the middle).

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Oh God yes, Brubaker's Sleeper was awesome, and my favorite of all his collaborations with Sean Phillips. I have the four older TPBs, but it has been reprinted in two thicker, nicer volumes: Sleeper Season One and Season Two. Make sure you also read Brubaker's prequel story, Point Blank, first.

On that note, you'll appreciate Point Blank and Sleeper even more if you read Alan Moore's mid-'90s WildC.A.T.s run first. Skip the older Homecoming and Gang War TPBs and get the more recent Alan Moore's Complete WildC.A.T.s TPB if you're truly interested, since that one includes his final story that was left out of the earlier Gang War TPB. It's very uneven, but the good stuff is surprisingly great, and it features some gorgeous Travis Charest art and a few fill-ins by Kevin Maguire and Jim Lee.

After that, Joe Casey worked wonders and miracles with his late '90s and early 2000s Wildcats run: Wildcats Volume 2 #8-28 (collected in the Vicious Circle, Serial Boxes, and Battery Park TPBs) and Wildcats 3.0 #1-24 (collected in Wildcats 3.0 Year One and Year Two TPBs; skip the earlier Brand Building and Full Disclosure TPBs that reprinted #1-6 and 7-12, which make up the later Year One edition). That was also one of my all-time favorite runs, and it includes great art by Sean Phillips and Dustin Nguyen. Also, Wildcats 3.0 always had gorgeous, eye-catching covers designed by Rian Hughes.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Hakkesshu posted:

So I guess if I already picked up the first one, there's no need for me to get anything else in that series?

Edit: Never mind, I somehow missed the few posts talking about it.

I loved Ellis' run back in the day (along with his Stormwatch that preceded it, now combined in two nice volumes) but hated Millar's Authority. Nothing but unlikeable, sadistic "heroes," even worse villains, and lots of unnecessary shock value. I don't even like Quitely's art (yes, I'm that guy), so it was one more mark against it for me.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Metal Loaf posted:

Can anybody tell me what "bookshelf format" denotes? I've noticed it used to describe the contents of a couple of slightly older TPBs (e.g. the backcover of Excalibur Classic Vol. 2 says that it includes the "Mojo Mayhem bookshelf").

At least in that context, Mojo Mayhem was what DC might have called a "Prestige Format" book. It was 2-3 times as long as a normal comic, printed on glossy paper with no ads, bound with an actual spine (with the title on it; hence the "bookshelf format" moniker), rather than stapled, and probably had a cover price in the $5 range. Marvel and DC have both referred to these sorts of books as "Original Graphic Novels" in the past, as opposed to a TPB of previously-collected material. Most of DC's Elseworlds graphic novels were in that format.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Sharzak posted:

Asian is actually kind of what we're going for although she's an ethnic chameleon so that will be fine. Thanks for the suggestions. Googling doesn't really have much on the subject.
We might end up being Mazikeen and Lucifer--she's brown-ish, in some issues.

Another good choice: Promethea.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


WickedHate posted:

The Extremists were originally villians to the Champions of Angor, which had a Thor, Scarlet Witch, Ant Man, and Hawkeye. The Scarlet Witch(Silver Sorceress) and Ant Man(Blue Jay) came over to the main universe and were briefly on some incarnation of the Justice League.

Wandjina was their Thor analogue (from Giffen and DeMatteis' Justice League #2-3), and they mentioned another Champion of Angor, Captain Speed (a Quicksilver analogue) who had passed away from radioactive fallout after the Extremists launched nukes on their world. Interestingly, Captain Speed was referred to as Johnny Quick in a different JLI story several years later.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Uthor posted:

I would bag and board, stick the stack into a grocery bag or wrap with newspaper (so it stays as a single bundle), maybe sandwich between two pieces of cardboard if you think it's necessary, and chuck it into a box. Just need to make sure the individual issues don't slide around and the corners don't get banged up.

Seconded. This is exactly how I ship comics.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


I think the time is right for a Booster Gold TV series, following the success of Arrow (and no doubt Flash as well). Now, even more than when he was created in 1987, our culture is obsessed with celebrity worship and following the everyday lives of famous people (who may just be famous for being famous) as aspirational stories. Plus, the last 15 years of TV have been very welcoming for antiheroes.

With Booster Gold, you get a classic antihero-turned-hero story: a washed-up, disgraced jock from the future travels back to our time seeking fame and fortune, becomes a celebrity, does some actual good (sometimes in spite of himself, and sometimes at the cost of his own financial gain), and finds redemption along the way. He's a narcissist who eventually puts others ahead of himself. He's a screw-up who becomes competent. He's shallow and short-sighted but grows to care about things that really matter. The season-long arc could be that the corporation that sponsors him turns out to be up to no good, and he becomes his own man, turning on the wealthy, amoral people who pulled his strings for too long.

Booster is a dynamic character, far more than most other superheroes. And his power set (flight, energy blasts, force fields) wouldn't require a gigantic budget to do on television, even on the CW. There were some rumors a few years ago about SyFy being interested in a Booster Gold show, but I haven't heard anything about it in a while.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


I consider myself a big Daredevil fan, so I feel like I should know this, but somehow, I get the impression it was never addressed -- at least not by Miller, Bendis, Brubaker, Diggle, or what I've read by Waid so far.

When Matt was a boy and he pushed that old man out of the way of the truck and got blinded by the radioactive material... why wasn't there a lawsuit? Or was there? Did we ever learn if it was a government or military vehicle, or private industry? What was the purpose of the material, and where was it going, and why wasn't it secured better, and why wasn't the driver paying more attention?

You'd think in any case, Battlin' Jack Murdock could have sued someone and won, to at least establish a trust for his newly-blinded son. Or did he, and is that how Matt was able to attend Columbia for law school, despite growing up poor?

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


picosecond posted:

I maintain a soft spot for early Spawn, Shadow Hawk & Savage Dragon -- but Younglood? Nope. I don't think I know anyone who even liked it at the time. I'm told the Liefeldverse got pretty cool once they hired some good writers for it, like when they hired Alan Moore for Supreme and let him do all the things with it that DC's editors would never let him do with Superman. Maybe that's what people are nostalgic for, not Youngblood itself.

Shaft from Youngblood was kind of a neat idea, though. "Green Arrow + Bullseye and he's also a government agent" seems like it might be a fun premise, even if he is a mash-up any 12-year-old could've come up with.

I think Shaft was meant even more as a Speedy/Arsenal analogue, right down to the red costume. Liefeld was always a huge Teen Titans fan, right down to naming Deadpool/Wade Wilson after Deathstroke/Slade Wilson.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Jerry Cotton posted:

He probably thought "Eh, I'll do it tomarre *squawk*"



I was reading this on my phone in the break room at work, and you made me crack up so suddenly and so loud that people heard me behind the closed door. That was the highlight of my day!

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Back in Giffen and DeMatteis' Justice League International series in the late '80s, Maxwell Lord licensed a Justice League comic that portrayed Guy Gardner as a wimpy idiot, which he was for a brief time after Batman knocked him out with one punch and he hit his head getting back up. When Guy's true personality came back, he was offended and pissed about the comic, since he didn't remember his time spent as a friendly simpleton.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Skwirl posted:

The TV thread made me realize how little I know about Flash. What difference, if any, is there between Zoom and Reverse Flash?

There are two separate characters, but both wore similar yellow costumes.

The first one was mostly called Reverse-Flash, but also went by Professor Zoom. He was one of Barry Allen's Silver Age Rogues, who was probably around since the '60s. His real name was Eobard Thawne, and I believe he was from the future. At one point, Barry Allen killed him by snapping his neck in order to protect Iris, and he stood trial for it. That was in the early-to-mid '80s, and soon after the trial, Barry died saving the multiverse during the Crisis on Infinite Earths storyline, where the skies turned red. In the mid-2000s, Geoff Johns brought Barry and Reverse-Flash back from the dead and established the continuity where Barry's mother had been killed and his father was framed for the murder.

There is a separate character called Zoom, who Geoff Johns created in his excellent run on the Wally West Flash comic in the early 2000s. He was a criminal profiler named Hunter Zolomon whose legs were destroyed by a rampaging Grodd, and he blamed Wally. At some point, this Zoom decided to make Wally a better hero by challenging him and causing him to suffer, and launched several attacks against Wally's loved ones. I'm not sure what happened to him.

Hopefully a bigger Flash fan can come along and fill in some of these blanks with actual Flash Facts.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou fucked around with this message at 18:49 on Oct 19, 2014

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Another good book is Seal of Approval: The History of the Comics Code, by Amy Kiste Nyberg.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Shitshow posted:

Thanks much, Hurt and Lou.

Not to be a shill, but I actually have a copy of Seal of Approval for sale, listed in my SA-Mart thread. I won't be offended if you aren't interested, though.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Madkal posted:

One thing that I find jarring isn't necessarily bad art but a change in artwork/direction. I know artists might not be able to keep up with the workload and sometimes fill-in's are there. While this can be jarring, it is usually temporary and a bit of a necessary evil. However, the one thing that I do find jarring is when there is a long-term artist on a book who is replaced with another long term artist and the style takes a radical change. I have been reading Brubakers Catwoman run with initial art by Darwin Cooke (who I love) and the final collection has artwork by Pulacy (who I don't have a problem with outside of Catwoman) and the artwork switch is so off-putting that I find myself not really enjoying the Pulacy stuff at all. The stories are still okay (though the seemed to peak with the Relentless storyline) but every time I look at a Pulacy panel I feel sad that it isn't a Cooke panel instead.

Even after Cooke left, they replaced him with Brad Rader and Cameron Stewart, two artists with low-key, tasteful, vaguely Timm-inspired styles, similar to Cooke's. I absolutely loved that series through #24, owned the four original TPBs (reprinted in the first two more recent volumes), and never read #25-37 with Gulacy's art until relatively recently.

I couldn't take it. I sold that last TPB because it was difficult to look at... and you're right, even the stories weren't as good as the earlier material with Black Mask and the cross-country road trip.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Medullah posted:

This might not be the best place to ask, but figured I'd ask.

I'm looking to round out my Hellblazer collection and only need a few issues (53,55,59,88 and 266). Are there any good online retailers with good stock, or should I just say eff it and go on ebay?

The usual suspects are Mile High Comics and MyComicShop. I never order from them, since they're on the expensive side (plus you have to deal with shipping), but they would probably end up cheaper than eBay, where you'd have to pay at least $3 per issue on shipping (and probably more), since they would probably all come from different sellers.

If you want, I live near a few great comic shops, and I'd be happy to check for you. I'd charge you the exact cost plus shipping, if I connect with them.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Medullah posted:

Yeah if you're ever there and take a look, go for it, I'd appreciate it - this has been a ~2 year project so I'm not in a huge hurry. Unfortunately most of the LCS near me are new comic only so back issues are a rarity.

You can PM me or email me at my username @ gmail.com.

You've got mail! I can connect with three out of those five for sure, at $3.50 each, plus whatever shipping works out to be.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Could it have been Stardust the Super-Wizard by Fletcher Hanks? That was batshit insane, but I'm not sure if it was the right kind of batshit insane.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


RandallODim posted:



Along with NFL Superpro, there's ROM, Godzilla, the Micronauts and someone else I can't identify (Road Warrior?). Should've had Conan.

Shogun Warriors, big Japanese robot toys from the '70s that came from different anime, manga, and toy lines, but were rebranded together as part of one big line from Bandai. Toys were huge and heavy, full of die-cast metal parts and missiles that actually fired. I would think most are huge collectors' items today.

The comics... not so much. (Although they did fight Godzilla, if I'm not mistaken.)

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


That's why Deadshot and Captain Cold are two of my all-time favorite villains (and characters in general). They're professionals with codes of honor. They don't want to take over the world or murder everyone in it. They're working stiffs who are good at what they do, with grudging respect for the heroes they are often forced into conflict with.

The Shade is another one of my favorite characters, even though he's much more of an antihero now than a villain. He's a murderous immortal rogue, but also a romantic, cultured man of the world who has fought on the side of the angels multiple times, from World War II to the present day. And whenever he returns to his beloved Opal City, he refuses to commit crimes there, and he'll fight like hell to defend it against threats. He was possessed by his arch-enemy, a man called Culp, when he committed some of his most unspeakable acts.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Uthor posted:

I really need to read Starman again. I really liked that issue set way in the future where he was telling kids about the history of Starman through time (I'm a sucker for those types of stories). Was that a DC One Million tie-in?

Has The Shade appeared anywhere else? He's so tied to the city in my mind.

I think that was Starman Annual #2, from the summer when all DC Annuals had the "Legends of the Dead Earth" theme. Starman #1,000,000 was about Farris Knight, Ted and Jack's distant descendent, who was a dick and a traitor.

Did you ever read Robinson's Shade miniseries from 2012? He has a lot more globetrotting adventures in that series, and you'll enjoy it if you're a Starman fan like I am.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Dario the Wop posted:

Amanda Conner's PG really was great. Wish we could've seen that Vartox on the Supergirl show.

Wish we could've gotten a Power Girl show instead.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Have Mike Allred's early, pre-Madman comics ever been collected anywhere? I've always wanted to read Grafik Muzik, Graphique Musique, Dead Air, and Creatures of the Id, but the back issues are super-rare and tend to be pricey. Who would even own the reprint rights to those now, considering Image has published the most recent Madman collections?

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


redbackground posted:

Grafik Muzik: No

Graphique Musique: Nope

Dead Air: Sorry

Creatures of the Id: Yes!

Thank you, but dammit! I own an older edition of the Madman Adventures TPB from Tundra that doesn't include it.

Time to upgrade!

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Over at DC, Renee Montoya (formerly the Question, a GCPD detective, and a PI) is a recovering alcoholic. That is, if she even exists anymore.

So is Hal Jordan, who did jail time for a DUI.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


prefect posted:

Pete's not too proud to pay for a costume when he needs it.



Spider-Man vs. Wolverine #1. A random purchase from a newsstand spinner rack when I was a kid that turned out to be awe-inspiring, surprisingly dark, and served as a necessary lead-in to Amazing Spider-Man #289, where they finally revealed the Hobgoblin's identity.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


bobkatt013 posted:

Lemire did in the past, but now he just writes.

Same with Bendis, with his early works (Torso, Goldfish, Jinx, Fortune and Glory).

Did anyone mention Darwyn Cooke, Matt Wagner, and Mike Allred? Allred is more of an artist for hire now, but he wrote and drew his own work (Madman, The Atomics) for many years. And Cooke might be the most talented writer/artist in the business.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Skwirl posted:

That pissed me off too.

I will claim to my dying day that Bendis' run on Daredevil is at least equal to, and might be better than, Frank Miller's.

I agree with you!

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Ultragonk posted:

Is Batman: Ego any good?

Very good, especially if you like the Batman: The Animated Series aesthetic. Darwyn Cooke worked as an animator before getting into comics (he designed the opening sequence for Batman Beyond), and his comic work is outstanding, especially DC: The New Frontier. But there's a TPB out there that collects Batman: Ego and Catwoman: Selina's Big Score, which is also fantastic.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Agreed. Dick as Batman (in Snyder's Black Mirror storyline) was awesome.

Morrison's Batman mega-epic run was mostly great, although the way it was collected can be daunting for some readers, and it suffered from some really inconsistent art at times.

Do you have the Hoopla service through your public library? It includes all the Morrison Batman TPBs and tons of other stuff, all as e-books you can check out and download for three weeks at a time. My library system allows me six checkouts per month, but larger systems have been known to allow more.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


My perfect X-team has 13 members, perfect for splitting up into Blue and Gold teams.

Cyclops
Jean
Wolverine
Beast
Rogue
Gambit
Kitty
Storm
(Arch)angel
Iceman
Colossus
Nightcrawler
Psylocke

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


SonicRulez posted:

When you think of The Avengers, who's on the team? I figure Cap, Iron Man, Thor, Hawkeye, Ant-Man, Wasp, Quicksilver, and Scarlet Witch. You can take or leave Hulk and Vision.

Cap, Iron Man, Hawkeye, Thor, Black Widow, and now, thanks to Bendis, I think of Luke Cage and Spider-Man.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Wildstorm was KILLING IT in the early 2000s. They had Warren Ellis' Stormwatch leading into Authority, plus his brilliant Planetary. They had Joe Casey writing a stunning, underrated, underappreciated run of Wildcats based on plot threads set up by Alan Moore during his mid-'90s run. And they had Ed Brubaker redefining noir and espionage comics and still making them fit into a world of superheroes and supervillains with Point Blank and Sleeper, also inspired by Alan Moore's WildC.A.T.s. What an era of comics. Of course it couldn't last, but those were all such quality titles. And that doesn't even go into Moore's simultaneous work on America's Best Comics at Wildstorm.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


I always assumed his head is where the helmet neck piece is, and the oval-shaped dome is just above his head, like a hat.

The alternative is far more horrifying.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006



I love that story so drat much. Best thing to ever come out of Astro City.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Selachian posted:

I wonder if they had Doom lose his cape because the Secret Wars toy version didn't come with one.



Secret Wars was a notoriously low-budget toy line. Mattel probably used that simpler Doom costume because they didn't want the expense of sculpting and mass-producing his cloak and cape, and I also recall a rumor that they didn't want some medieval-looking guy, but someone more robotlike. So instead, he got a "swimsuit" and a garter.

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Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Jessica Walter (aka Lucille Bluth and Mallory Archer) was pretty hot back then.

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