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Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


DoomTrainPhD posted:

Podman is production ready OP.

Eh I wouldn't go that far, much as I love it.

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Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Nitrousoxide posted:

Played around with Podman and Cockpit and while both are pretty cool, they do lack some functionality I use all the time in Portainer/Docker like editing existing containers (which is really copying the existing container setup, taking down the running container, and then starting up the edited duplicate). I'm also not seeing the containers I make for Podman in Cockpit in the CLI version of Podman. The list flag to the Podman command just doesn't return anything. Are they somehow running two instances of Podman that aren't talking to each other?

I do like the very straightforward support for existing docker images, and the repos for docker images are built into both Podman and Cockpit which is nice.

I see Podman supposedly supports docker compose files with their 3.0 release, which is pretty neat. Didn't get a chance to check that out. Cockpit doesn't support Podman using docker compose as far as I can see, so you'd have to do it via the CLI.

Probably stick to Docker for now but I'll keep an eye on Podman.

Podman suffers a lot from versioning issues like any cutting edge technology stack, depending on your OS it may be great or you might have to use a bunch of weird workarounds or stuff might just be missing entirely despite documentation suggesting otherwise.

For example on CentOS 8 I still have to manually go in and delete a bunch of networking related files from var/lib/containerd anytime my machine does a hard reboot before any services will start. This bug was fixed a year or more ago and I don't have to deal with it on my Fedora server.

That's why I say it's not production ready, it's been pretty buggy still on really anything that's not Fedora for me.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


imagine defending vscode

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


animist posted:

since my dev machine died I gotta put linux on my gaming desktop so I can do dev poo poo. trying to decide what distro to use this time.

debian? maybe I'll go with debian. i tried some of the "rolling release" distros but it turns out that just means "every update will break something".

Debian is a terrible choice for gaming, Fedora has been a rock solid experience for me, I think manjaro and pop os are the other good gaming ones.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


wsl is horrible nobody should be subjected to it

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


someone at Microsoft thinking "cygwin is real good I think it just needs a rebranding and we can capture the entire Linux user base!"

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Lol someone actually defended cygwin

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


matti posted:

how do you feel about this take

linux is a genius make-work project designed to extract money from capital

i think that makes a lot more sense than anything else

that's a pretty good one!!

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life




Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Thunderbird owns actually

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Just switch to a self hosted bitwarden install keepass has way to many edge cases, especially if you try and share poo poo with family

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Paying for a password manager no thanks

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Nitrousoxide posted:

I would not want to locally self-host a password manager since my house flooding or burning down would lose me access to everything, even if it was properly backed up off-site.

If your house burning or flooding is even on your radar then ugh you should probably move

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Maximo Roboto posted:

So who uses BSD and what is it good for compared to Linux?
Speaking of which, what was Solaris used for outside of corporate stuff, and why would anyone use Illumos or any other post-Solaris projects today?

It's good for publically hosted services although inevitably you can shoot yourself in the foot just as easily as anything else if you don't know what you're doing.

I think a properly built podman container with selinux running (especially rootless) is just as secure as anything on bsd but I'm not that familiar with BSD still learning :)

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


I only use ntfs because I use the correct operating system :chord:

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Wsl is dog poo poo for anything but coreutils on windows, everything else has a thousand edge cases

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


https://headspring.com/2021/01/07/how-to-run-native-docker-containers-on-wsl-2/

Yes the typical Windows simplicity of 'install a dozen different things and configure them all separately in arcane menus' just so you can connect to the remote daemon in the docker for Windows VM. Running containers, what an edge case!

Also this has only worked in preview versions the past year or so, sure hope your IT department keeps you updated.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Shaggar posted:

using linux is an edge case

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


NihilCredo posted:

what should i use to open a remote graphical desktop session on my fedora/gnome home computer from a laptop running windows?

built-in vnc server ("screen sharing") and tigervnc? and i'm guessing the vnc protocol is horribly insecure so i should be running it inside a vpn or ssh tunnel?

is there anything better?

Remmina is good and cross platform as are those.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Finally, the year of the Linux desktop

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


In a non-trolly fashion I don't understand how with the backing of Facebook and RHEL the RAID5/6 issues are still a thing. Is it just fundamentally broken?

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


RocketLunatic posted:

Hey this is another fun comment read:

https://lwn.net/Articles/872639/#Comments

Lots of references to obscure, bespoke android spin offs that try to block Google tracking and stuff (which I don’t have a problem with).

LineageOS, e (??), CalyxOS, PostmarketOS, blah…

My favorite comment is the smug dude who says:

The first response on his comment is to let him know his phone is probably not secure and spewing data. :lol:

just lol if don't have a problem with google tracking and also that you can't fathom why anyone else would

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


DoomTrainPhD posted:

Rocky linux became a joke the second IBM made RHEL free for <= 16 systems

When was this

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


pseudorandom name posted:

Non-technical video game nerds keep going on and on about how SSDs are going to change everything and how consoles can now replace the entire contents of RAM from the SSD faster than you can spin the camera around the scene and how DirectStorage will be revolutionary on Windows 11 and I keep attempting to explain to them that load times are a business decision, not a technical one, and while Naughty Dog might be willing to devote multiple man years to making the loads instant and invisible, the only thing that SSDs will do for most games is allow the developer to spend even less time optimizing their level design and engine performance and whatnot.

Lmbo if you think SSDs aren't a game changer, RDR2 goes from a 5 minute load to 30 seconds.

Also have you looked at a game from 5-10 years ago vs. anything modern? Y'all are massively understating the technological differences. Textures have gotten huge, which will load significantly faster from an ssd.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


pseudorandom name posted:

Yeah, you're one of those people who has conceptual difficulty with business decisions.

There is a load time threshold that humans are willing to tolerate.

If your load times are above this threshold, your game will lose sales.

It is worth spending your development money to reduce load times below that threshold. (Although you're not going to want to spend more money than you'll lose from the lost sales due to bad load times.)

Previously this threshold was set by the speed of CD-ROM drives and then DVD drives and then hard disks, and thus games were optimized to satisfy the threshold when running off of their target platform's storage media.

When you move a game optimized for hard disks to a SSD, naturally it will run faster, because it was designed to run off a slower disk.

Now that SSDs have become standard, games will be optimized to meet the threshold when running off of SSDs.

This is because the allocation of development resources is a business decision, and businesses don't actually care about load times, businesses care about doing the bare minimum necessary to avoid losing sales.

Ubiquitous SSDs will allow businesses to take the people who normally spent the entire project fighting a losing battle against load times and instead devote them to fighting the same losing battle against framerates or tightening up the graphics on level 3 or whatever.

What are you even talking about. Literally nobody is arguing that business will do the bare minimum, of course they will. That doesn't change the fact there is a huge and material change going from an HDD to an SSD, which is what every game console has done this / last generation, and it is in fact "a game changer". It doesn't matter if the company spends zero effort optimizing loading its still going to load 10x faster at a minimum and by your own argument it doesn't matter if they're developing for a HDD why would they give a poo poo either way. GTA Online is famously and simultaneously the worst loading and the best selling game of all time, and they couldn't be assed to spend the afternoon with a profiler to fix one of the most notoriously simple bugs causing 10 minute load screens for nearly a decade. What "load optimization threshold" where they spending man hours on, exactly?

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Sapozhnik posted:

http://kmkeen.com/maintainers-matter/
https://drewdevault.com/2019/12/09/Developers-shouldnt-distribute.html

If you don't like distro package managers then you're missing the purpose of Linux as a distinct ecosystem in the first place. None of the non-iOS operating systems have a particularly reliable way to run untrusted software at the moment; the Flatpak/Bubblewrap people are trying to move in that direction, but that's very much a work in progress (and the big "Sandboxed!" icon in certain prominent Flatpak package management frontends is incredibly harmful).

Any time you install software that didn't come to you from a reputable distribution then you are running the equivalent of "curl | sudo bash -", just in a less blatantly alarming way. In fact the "sudo" part isn't even all that important, neither your SSH key ring nor your browser's credential store requires sudo access. Windows EXEs, MacOS DMGs, AppImage, a Flatpak from Flathub (as opposed to Fedora's own Flatpak repository), whatever. Maybe Docker, when used correctly, is safe but I'm still nervous about betting on it. From a security standpoint they're all equivalent to curl bash and bet your safety on your absolute trust in the independent software vendor.

If you're downloading software from a reputable company via a secured delivery path then that trust is probably warranted, probably all it will do is rifle through your music collection and your installed programs and sell that aggregated information to marketers; most of them aren't quite brazen enough to rifle through your browser history on top of that.

If you're installing some random crap written by WeedGoku420 on the internet then well, you're getting raw-dogged by some stranger and you should be aware that this could have dire consequences.

What if I'm installing random crap from the Debian repo and "getting raw dogged"?

In short: computers are a land of contrasts

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Please dont remind me this is supposed to be a safe place

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


The best part is the excellent documentation.

Do you use debuild? Or debhelper? Or dpkg-buildpackage? Or maybe bzr-builddeb? What about git-buildpackage we use git? Or pbuilder?


Christ I hate the Debian packaging ecosystem

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


mawarannahr posted:

i like pacman and AUR. I’ve had problems maybe twice since 2006; with dnf too many times to count. apt is fine if you like software from 100 years ago.

Dnf owns sorry for your wrong opinion

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


How the hell did y'all go from

quote:

Yes, for containers used for development

Straight into arguing that he said he's deploying to prod straight from a development machine lmbo

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Lol if your in charge of company infrastructure and this is your level of reading comprehension

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Use podman not docker op.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Then you can manage those pesky dependencies with podman auto-update !!!

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Or not I stopped caring about dependencies 6 years ago :laugh:

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Fedora is great just make sure you enable rpm fusion repos and on the greeter select x11. Wayland might be alright for and GPUs but boy howdy is it still terrible for nvidia.



Why is windowing so complicated

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


post hole digger posted:

i heard that wayland + nvidia works better with fedora 35 (might have even been itt) but havent really looked into it yet

Yea no

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


I haven't had dedicated swap in years and I've never had an issue. RAM is cheap as poo poo, even with multiple desktop VMs all with browsers overloaded with tabs because I'm incapable of closing anything and simultaneously running memory intensive games I've never noticed oom killer or any performance degradation/crashing due to memory pressure. I'm only using half my ram slots too.

:shrug:

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


I feel like everyone complaining about the Linux desktop has only ever used gnome, try KDE its genuinely better than what your used to (windows).

I wish distros would stop using gnome its such a user hostile dog turd

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Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Sapozhnik posted:

I've tried KDE a bunch of times but it's always turned me off in one way or another. It's just clunky. I'm sure functionally it's fine but I don't want to deal with its aesthetic jank.

GNOME has a particular set of usage patterns in mind and they work for me. KDE doesn't have any particular usage patterns in mind and can be bastardized into doing whatever. Both have a valid place in the world.

If your experience is plasma 4 or early plasma 5 then sure, it was super buggy and/or hideous iirc. I've been using KDE in earnest since F30? Now and its been solid and genuinely the best desktop experience, as compared to any other Linux desktop, modern windows (lol if you put up with advertisements on your desktop) or mac.

I think the only hangup people might have about it these days is the corny K*something* apps it comes with. Its silly but easy to get over unless you're extremely OCD and a silver lining is its easy to tell which apps are part of the desktop. Most of them are actually pretty decent, which is surprising for a Linux DE.

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