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Hijinks Ensue
Jul 24, 2007


FreshFeesh: I do line editing, copyediting, and proofreading. Send me an email at booksidemanner at gmail dot com if you'd like to know more about rates, services, and so forth.

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FreshFeesh
Jun 3, 2007

Drum Solo



College Slice

Thank you Hijinks, I sent you an email

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011


Long time no see, selfpub thread.

I'm still making covers and I'm currently running an indiegogo campaign where I'm doing a cover a day and licensing them for use. Drop by and grab a deal: https://igg.me/at/30bookcovers



On the writerly front, would a genre short story collection be a good candidate for self publishing?

Bardeh
Dec 2, 2004



Fun Shoe

ravenkult posted:

Long time no see, selfpub thread.

I'm still making covers and I'm currently running an indiegogo campaign where I'm doing a cover a day and licensing them for use. Drop by and grab a deal: https://igg.me/at/30bookcovers



On the writerly front, would a genre short story collection be a good candidate for self publishing?

I'm not sure if February was the best month to choose for this project (sorry, I had to. Your art is fantastic though!)

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011


Bardeh posted:

I'm not sure if February was the best month to choose for this project (sorry, I had to. Your art is fantastic though!)

Probs, but I didn't wanna wait for...March? May? I don't know what month is good.

Bardeh
Dec 2, 2004



Fun Shoe

ravenkult posted:

Probs, but I didn't wanna wait for...March? May? I don't know what month is good.

It's just that your project says 'I'm creating 30 covers in 30 days for the month of February' but February only has 28 days

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011


Bardeh posted:

It's just that your project says 'I'm creating 30 covers in 30 days for the month of February' but February only has 28 days

God drat it. Yeah it was planned for a different month but I was busy then.

monkfoot
Jul 21, 2007
Whoops

ravenkult posted:

Long time no see, selfpub thread.

I'm still making covers and I'm currently running an indiegogo campaign where I'm doing a cover a day and licensing them for use. Drop by and grab a deal: https://igg.me/at/30bookcovers



On the writerly front, would a genre short story collection be a good candidate for self publishing?

I buy my covers exclusively from Ravenkult for all my vanity projects and all my genre work. He is V good and cool.

Hijinks Ensue
Jul 24, 2007


FreshFeesh posted:

Thank you Hijinks, I sent you an email

It ended up in my spam folder - I will reply to you on Sunday!

monkfoot
Jul 21, 2007
Whoops

Was accepted for an International Bookbub this week on a literary fiction pen-name. Ordered some promo around the date with BargainBooksy and ENT and a preliminary order from book-rank. Is there anything else I should be doing to maximize sell-through? The BB promo book will have a blurb in the back with my new release then some back-matter for my other books.

I don't know what else to do other than dump some ams/fb ads on the book and see how high I can push the book.

This is my current catalogue: https://www.amazon.com/d.c.s.-ross/...ine_cont_book_1

Thoughts?

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


My opinion is that BB is so massively overpowered everything else is chump change. It certainly can't hurt to put a bunch of outrigger promotions out there, but I've done promotions in the past where I chucked a few hundred dollars at a book, across multiple different sites, and saw my profits maybe triple across the month. (So going from $200 to $600, if I was lucky). In comparison I got a Bookbub on Christmas Eve and and made more money in the week to New Year's than I had all year.

Like I said, doesn't hurt, but I wouldn't sweat it too much. Bookbub will be 95% of the sales you get over the next month.

Pantothenate
Nov 26, 2005

This is an art gallery, my friend--and this is art.

ravenkult posted:

Long time no see, selfpub thread.

I'm still making covers and I'm currently running an indiegogo campaign where I'm doing a cover a day and licensing them for use. Drop by and grab a deal: https://igg.me/at/30bookcovers



On the writerly front, would a genre short story collection be a good candidate for self publishing?

I literally just finished cobbling together the gizzards of my first novel, and I like your art style, but there's nothing that fits my book (yet). However, I do have a quick question: Is the indiegogo for just the illustration, or would it include typography and spine/back cover design?

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011


Pantothenate posted:

I literally just finished cobbling together the gizzards of my first novel, and I like your art style, but there's nothing that fits my book (yet). However, I do have a quick question: Is the indiegogo for just the illustration, or would it include typography and spine/back cover design?

Paperback design is included.

Pantothenate
Nov 26, 2005

This is an art gallery, my friend--and this is art.

ravenkult posted:

Paperback design is included.

Sounds like a crazy deal, then. Just a shame none of the images really fit my current book--the next one I'm working on might suit the style better.

That being said, I do also have a question for all the self-publishing gurus: How do you go about getting quotes for your book jacket? Do you just, like, spam an advance copy to every reviewer in your genre and see who sends back? Do you do the same to authors you like and respect? All my peer reviews have been done by authors who have just published for themselves, and never really 'gone big' on self publishing like I'm trying to do. I could probably get some quotes from a few technical writers and Canadian poets (which I'm sure everyone looking for genre fiction looks for in a recommendation), but I don't personally know anyone who has a name that my target demographic would really recognize.

The elevator pitch for my book is:

quote:

A detective who can break your will with an errant thought has a chance encounter with an immortal superhuman drunk over the body of a man who isn't supposed to exist, setting into motion a storm of violence and intrigue that will forever alter the landscape of their reality.

It's an awkward sentence. I considered "Over the body of a man who isn't supposed to exist, an immortal superhuman drunk has a chance encounter with a detective who can break your will with an errant thought, setting into motion...", but the story revolves around the detective, not the drunk. Also, 'storm of violence and intrigue' seems pretty generic, now that I'm looking at it; I should probably get weird with that metaphor in a way that reflects the tone of the story.

Anyways, I'm trying to chase down like eight things at once, so my apologies if it seems scattered. I was more just asking about how a first-time author would go about finding someone to vouch his book.

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


As a rule I don't believe first-time self-pubbed authors use review quotes (though good luck to you if you get one). You'd be more concerned about getting a few advance copies to people you think will leave a good review for you on Amazon, thus raising your profile in the algorithm.

divabot
Jun 17, 2015

Assisted Living Dracula of Wikipedia

DO NOT BELIEVE THIS MAN'S LIE!
Statist shill spreading FUD!

HODL!!


press F to pay "fuckin gently caress"

Amazon posted:

In late August we announced that CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) would become one service and all CreateSpace books would be moved to KDP.

We are excited to share that the move is now complete for your CreateSpace account. To access your CreateSpace books on KDP, please log-in to your CreateSpace account and follow the instructions to get started.

We've consolidated the most frequently asked questions specific to the move from CreateSpace to KDP. We look forward to continuing to support you in publishing and welcome to KDP!

here's that faq, which doesn't contain anything interesting that I could spot at a 5 second glance.

The bit you care about : you will miss a month of paperback royalties as you get shifted from Createspace's schedule to Kindle's.

Welcome to monopsony, and enjoy your single customer!

Blorknorg
Jul 19, 2003
Crush me like a Blorknorg!

So in a somewhat end of my rope effort I've scrounged together enough to run promotions at the three places that seem to be repeatedly recommended here. (Bargainbooksy.com, Manybooks.net, and Booksends.com) Bafflingly as a Canadian I'm not allowed to see for myself that my Amazon 99 cent kindle thing is running but I've confirmed with a few folks that haven't bought copies in any form that it seems to be live.

So my promo runs until the 11th and assuming I get at least a trickle of interest I'm going to try some token amount on Bookbub around the 7th to the 11th. I took a glance and there seems to be two different ways to advertise via them, one that's for 1k impressions and the other that's for a clickthrough. Given that the clickthroughs claim to average 60 cents, and I do sort of feel like my book has a decent factor of 'wtf, really?' when they see it would my best bet to go for the impressions one? Is there a sweet spot of sorts for the budget on Bookbub? I was going to just do about 40$ over 3 days or something similar.

I presume it's bad form to give a link in the thread so here's my cover if nothing else for reference:

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


I have no experience with Bookbub's paid ads but there's no problem with posting a link to your book here. I think people tend to be coy about it because when this thread was more active there were some really serious earners who didn't want to get goon-doxxed.

smarties
Mar 5, 2019


New account so I don't feel so bad about my SA name and my posts as a teenager with access to their big brother's credit card being linked to anything I write and try to sell

Recently I've been thinking again of giving this whole writing-for-rent thing a try. Last time I read this thread was around 2015, and romance was bringing in the big bucks.

As it's been a long time since then, I have a few questions

Is romance still where the money lies?
Is it as profitable as it was?
Is it still realistic to expect it to pay bills if I can consistently get down, say, a thousand words a day, Monday-Friday?
Is there any point in releasing anywere except Kindle Unlimited?
Last time marketing really put me off - is it a major headache or barely an inconvenience these days?
Is paying an editor necessary or is the real solution to write more?
What can I expect to invest in getting people to actually read my book (editing costs, costs of a decent cover, price of whatever marketing needs to be done, anything else I don't know about)?

I really want to give it a good go this time. That way, if it doesn't work out, I can at least know it wasn't because I didn't take it seriously enough.

smarties fucked around with this message at Mar 5, 2019 around 10:22

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Blorknorg posted:

So my promo runs until the 11th and assuming I get at least a trickle of interest I'm going to try some token amount on Bookbub around the 7th to the 11th. I took a glance and there seems to be two different ways to advertise via them, one that's for 1k impressions and the other that's for a clickthrough. Given that the clickthroughs claim to average 60 cents, and I do sort of feel like my book has a decent factor of 'wtf, really?' when they see it would my best bet to go for the impressions one? Is there a sweet spot of sorts for the budget on Bookbub? I was going to just do about 40$ over 3 days or something similar.

The CPM (impressions) ads usually come out much cheaper than the CPC ads so I usually opt for those. Unfortunately you have a lot more options in how to target than any other platform, so it can take a lot of trial and error to find the targets that respond to your stuff. You should subscribe to the BookBub newsletter of your genre and look at the ads being shown, as that's another whole consideration. It's going to be very difficult recouping your first $40 spent on the platform, but who knows?

smarties posted:

Is romance still where the money lies?

It's still the largest pool of money but it's also the highest competition. There might be smaller pools with much less competition for each reader dollar. If I had to start over today from scratch I would either write something super specific (like lesbian vampire romance) or in a non-romance genre.

quote:

Is it as profitable as it was?

Nope.

quote:

Is it still realistic to expect it to pay bills if I can consistently get down, say, a thousand words a day, Monday-Friday?

It's very unlikely that you will start out making that much by publishing just 20k words per month or four novels per year. Many romance authors in KU aim for publishing a novel once a month or so.

quote:

Is there any point in releasing anywere except Kindle Unlimited?

I used to be hardcore KU and have been wide for the past 1.5 years. I much prefer being wide as the money is more consistent and I don't have to worry about Amazon banning me from their platform forever. Plus I can charge $6.99 for a novel and spend $3 acquiring a new customer.

quote:

Last time marketing really put me off - is it a major headache or barely an inconvenience these days?

If you're ok using the CPC ad platforms, you'll be fine. The newsletters are mostly too expensive now, so you can save your time and money. I'm not sure what the situation is for newsletter swaps. I suspect they're still useful.

quote:

Is paying an editor necessary or is the real solution to write more?

People might sit through a 5k erotic short if your writing is poo poo. They will NOT do that for a 50k romance.

quote:

What can I expect to invest in getting people to actually read my book (editing costs, costs of a decent cover, price of whatever marketing needs to be done, anything else I don't know about)?

The costs of many services are way down as sites like upwork and fiverr make it easier to find people very skilled at certain technical tasks, like making a book cover. It also depends on your subgenre of romance: produce something for an underserved market and people will throw money at you. Write another billionaire romance book and good luck getting noticed.

quote:

I really want to give it a good go this time. That way, if it doesn't work out, I can at least know it wasn't because I didn't take it seriously enough.

It will probably take a year or two to see anything approaching success.

Bardeh
Dec 2, 2004



Fun Shoe

I started out in 2012 writing short smut, and the money was fuckin easy to make. Bang out 3k shorts, stick a shoddy cover on it, in comes the money. To make any money at all doing that these days you have to write really weird and out there stuff and you have to release one or two shorts a day.

Like most other writers, I then moved into romance. At first that was easy too. The market wasn't saturated, and there was huge demand. That demand is still there, but the saturation is ridiculous. Gone are the days where you can just release a book with no promotion and make money off it. I eventually gave up publishing my own stuff because the ad spend was getting ridiculous and it is a lot of work (that I hated and was bad at) to promote a book well. Now I've got a day job again and I ghostwrite on the side. I get a plan from whoever is paying me, write it, get paid a set amount, and move on. It makes budgeting a lot easier, and it's way less stressful than putting a ton of time, money and effort into my own book only to stress about how much it'll make me, being uncertain of my income month to month.

The money is still there, and the readers are as voracious as they ever were. They just have a whole shitload more choice these days, and it's that much more difficult to reach them.

If I was going to start a new penname, the first thing I would do is some research on underserved niches. This can be as simple as looking at the bestseller lists on Amazon, and trying to find subgenres and trends that are ranking well but aren't overly saturated. You can get more indepth with this using various tools like KDP Rocket and stuff like that. Be aware that a ton of people are also going to be doing this, and trends can change fast. 20k words a month might not be enough to keep up.

LionArcher
Mar 29, 2010



Couple things, as someone who does this for a living. Romance is still king, but if you love writing something else, (sci fi, thrillers or mysteries) write what you love the most. Read ten books that are in the top 100 of those genres, and then start writing. A thousand words a day is nothing. It would take me less than a half hour to write that. Unless you focus on smut (and I would not) it’s just not enough.

monkfoot
Jul 21, 2007
Whoops

My bookbub is a massive failure so far. Anyone else have a bad experience with them?

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

monkfoot posted:

My bookbub is a massive failure so far. Anyone else have a bad experience with them?



It looks like their estimate for an Int'l 99c Lit Fic is 480 sales, so 65 is a big miss. What about pagereads? Also, your book is showing the Recommendations area up top, not Also Boughts (they're back and forth testing this). A lot of authors are hypothesizing that this is causing big drops in revenue these past few weeks. The things Amazon are recommending are often items with no connection to what you're browsing or, worse, items they know you already own.

Besides that, down below where you'd find the Also Boughts I'm just seeing Also Vieweds, which could mean that your book hasn't sold enough recently to be part of the AB engine. The 65 sales should change that, so you might see even more sales/borrows flow in as your book pops up in other books ABs.

But in general I think BB is losing some value to authors as their prices increase and their readers become inundated with books and emails. They will probably be loosening their strict guidelines and taking more chances on books that might miss.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011


I also have a Bookbub going today, hopefully it does slightly better.

https://www.bookbub.com/books/ameri...uitz?ebook_deal

York_M_Chan
Sep 11, 2003



I've gotten so much useful information from this thread. My book is finally out! I'm doing $1.99 or Kindle and $9.99 for the paperback.

https://www.amazon.com/Lingeria-Boo...k/dp/B07NZ7YQ52



LINGERIA: A wondrous world of centaurs, goblins, elves, knights, bounty hunters, giant centipedes, angry bookies, four-armed Yetis, and one wizard. But there is a problem – Lingeria shouldn’t exist. It is the product of acclaimed, and depressed, author Norman Halliday’s imagination. So, how did Norman come to be sleeping on the couch of one of his fictional characters? And why are Norman’s novels revered as Lingerian scripture? Also, why does all of Lingeria think Norman is God? Actually, a better question is … Who is this cruel wizard, about whom Norman never wrote, that seized power over the land? But first we should probably do something about that giant black cloud that sucks the life out of everything it passes over. Okay, so there is more than one problem. Joining Norman to untangle the mess that Lingeria has become is a lonely runt named Roe; Tahra, a moody mercenary; an anonymous goblin; and a blind librarian. With heroes like these, stopping Lingeria from being wiped out of existence should be as easy as fighting a hairless sewer ape.

Flossie
Nov 8, 2008


First time posting on here. I've read a lot of the thread, it's all great information.

I've written my first book and I am currently editing it. It's a murder mystery set in London in the 1930s. I am confident it fits in its genre and I'm intending to pay for a professional to make the cover. I can't afford an editor or proofreader (without sacrificing significant money from my family's holiday budget) but I'm pretty confident I can get my book out with only a handful of errors at most. I plan to publish via KDP.

I wrote the book in two and a half months. I'm looking to write a book every two months (with a little wiggle room) so 5 or 6 a year. I aim to have a catalogue of at least ten books by the end of next year. I'm incredibly intimidated by the marketing and promotional aspects of self publishing, but whilst I find it a little stressful I am enjoying the writing (I'm part way through book 2 already).

I work part time and I'm not hugely concerned with making money in the short term but I would like all the work to have been worth it in the long run. I wouldn't need to make a lot of money a month to be happy, enough to buy groceries would feel like a success to me.

My question is - (based on the proviso my books have good covers, blurbs and few errors) is it reasonable to just concentrate on writing for a couple of years and then worry about building up an audience once I have a reasonably sized catalogue?

freebooter
Jul 7, 2009

AUSTRALIA
NEEDS
TURNBULL


Flossie posted:

My question is - (based on the proviso my books have good covers, blurbs and few errors) is it reasonable to just concentrate on writing for a couple of years and then worry about building up an audience once I have a reasonably sized catalogue?

It's not really an either/or proposition. Building up an audience takes a long time, and simply by steadily putting out books and marketing them properly, that's what you'll be doing along the way.

York_M_Chan
Sep 11, 2003



York_M_Chan posted:

I've gotten so much useful information from this thread. My book is finally out! I'm doing $1.99 or Kindle and $9.99 for the paperback.

https://www.amazon.com/Lingeria-Boo...k/dp/B07NZ7YQ52



LINGERIA: A wondrous world of centaurs, goblins, elves, knights, bounty hunters, giant centipedes, angry bookies, four-armed Yetis, and one wizard. But there is a problem – Lingeria shouldn’t exist. It is the product of acclaimed, and depressed, author Norman Halliday’s imagination. So, how did Norman come to be sleeping on the couch of one of his fictional characters? And why are Norman’s novels revered as Lingerian scripture? Also, why does all of Lingeria think Norman is God? Actually, a better question is … Who is this cruel wizard, about whom Norman never wrote, that seized power over the land? But first we should probably do something about that giant black cloud that sucks the life out of everything it passes over. Okay, so there is more than one problem. Joining Norman to untangle the mess that Lingeria has become is a lonely runt named Roe; Tahra, a moody mercenary; an anonymous goblin; and a blind librarian. With heroes like these, stopping Lingeria from being wiped out of existence should be as easy as fighting a hairless sewer ape.

Just wanted to update that the Kindle version is Free today. https://www.amazon.com/Lingeria-Boo...k/dp/B07NZ7YQ52

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Flossie posted:

I've written my first book and I am currently editing it. It's a murder mystery set in London in the 1930s. I am confident it fits in its genre and I'm intending to pay for a professional to make the cover. I can't afford an editor or proofreader (without sacrificing significant money from my family's holiday budget)

You can get a 50k word novel edited for less than $50. Just check freelance sites. Results will be somewhere in between spellcheck and career editor, though.

quote:

My question is - (based on the proviso my books have good covers, blurbs and few errors) is it reasonable to just concentrate on writing for a couple of years and then worry about building up an audience once I have a reasonably sized catalogue?

Honestly, no it isn't. My successful pen name is successful because of constant tending and care. I have ads that send people to my mailing list and a few permafree titles, and these are going 24/7. I reach out to do swaps with other authors and book newsletters. I'll get close to six figures this year on this pen name.

One of my failed pen names (that I'm still releasing for) is one where I just release the books (Clean and Wholesome Romance) without any fanfare. It's been almost a year, I've put out four novels, and I've grossed $300. If this is where I'd started I would be devastated. Thankfully it's just a costly experiment.

The most powerful word in marketing is new. You have complete control over your release schedule (especially if you're not depending on the money) so you might want to consider waiting to publish until you have 3-4 books done. Then in one day you release the first three books (I really hope these are a series) and a month later continue your normal release schedule. That way if someone likes book 1, they can instantly grab books 2 and 3 instead of waiting and then forgetting.

I'm going to be doing this with a brand new pen name and genre. In fact I'm not going to launch book 1 until the audiobook and paperback for it are ready. Then I'll line up the biggest splash I can manage.

KrunkMcGrunk
Jul 2, 2007

Sometimes I sit and think, and sometimes I just sit.

I released three books in a spy thriller within 2 weeks of each other late last fall (prequel magnet, book 1, and book 2). I had mixed results, but I don't think releasing like that hurt me. I'm leaning more toward books on a steady, quick schedule. Of course quick can mean a lot of different things, depending on genre. Right now I'm shooting for one espionage thriller a month. Seems to work for this genre, but we'll see!

Also, in lieu of running ads pointing to freebie NL magnets, I would urge people here to give BookFunnel cross promos a shot. They are super easy to set up, and have netted me about 1.5k reasonably-engaged newsletter signups over 2ish months.

Heliogabalos
Apr 16, 2017
you can still key in codes for the cheapest of item (for example, celery instead of organic whatever) and no one pays any attention and it saves me a fuckton of money on organic produce

Okay, these might be dumb questions so bear with me. I read the OP and the last couple of pages but there is a long time span from page 1-152.

Is it a terrible idea to e-publish a novel in two parts to gauge interest? I love the book I am writing but it is also a lot of work and requires considerable research. Also I suffer from mental health issues (treated, but still tough to live with). Sometimes I go weeks and months without writing - so obviously I am not looking to make a living. These issues are directly related to never having submitted anything for publication (except one sci-fi story 15 years ago which was rejected and I still haven't recovered lol). Anyway.

I finally want to share this new novel because it's been a hell of a lot of fun when I do have the energy to write, and I would definitely find the will to finish it if people were buying it. I'm almost at the 30 000 word mark and at a logical Part 2 split. I think it's a cool idea and it just flowed out so seamlessly (...like water! See, I'm a writer).

Then, how much do you charge for a first publication? I see a lot of variance, and by that I consider .99 cents to $7 quite a bit of variance; no doubt people charge more because they've established themselves, so is there a benchmark for new writers that I've missed?

Also, on a different note, is there a market for short story collections? I have about 20 years of short stories that have never before published. Mostly sci-fi but general fiction too, with some historical fiction and alt-historical fiction to boot.

Apologies in advance if these are stupid questions. I am definitely following the 1-2-3 advice of blurb, cover design and getting it edited first.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Heliogabalos posted:

Is it a terrible idea to e-publish a novel in two parts to gauge interest? I love the book I am writing but it is also a lot of work and requires considerable research. Also I suffer from mental health issues (treated, but still tough to live with). Sometimes I go weeks and months without writing - so obviously I am not looking to make a living. These issues are directly related to never having submitted anything for publication (except one sci-fi story 15 years ago which was rejected and I still haven't recovered lol). Anyway.

I don't think that publishing half a novel on Amazon would be well received. Even serialized short stories are complete in and of themselves and tie together with the larger arc or theme.

However, there are venues that are designed for episodic content where you can publish it a chapter at a time and gauge the interest that way. Radish Fiction is one, Webnovel is another, and there might be a few others (Scribd?). Your ability to monetize on any of these is questionable, but expecting money for half a novel is probably not the right mindset anyway.

quote:

I finally want to share this new novel because it's been a hell of a lot of fun when I do have the energy to write, and I would definitely find the will to finish it if people were buying it. I'm almost at the 30 000 word mark and at a logical Part 2 split. I think it's a cool idea and it just flowed out so seamlessly (...like water! See, I'm a writer).

If it's a pleasurable experience then just work on it until it's done. It doesn't matter if it takes a month or ten years.

quote:

Then, how much do you charge for a first publication? I see a lot of variance, and by that I consider .99 cents to $7 quite a bit of variance; no doubt people charge more because they've established themselves, so is there a benchmark for new writers that I've missed?

It depends on what your goal is. If you just want to get it out there and have people read it then a low price point (99c and in Kindle Unlimited) will be the best route.

quote:

Also, on a different note, is there a market for short story collections? I have about 20 years of short stories that have never before published. Mostly sci-fi but general fiction too, with some historical fiction and alt-historical fiction to boot.

Not really. If they're the same genre and style as your novel, you could use them as a newsletter magnet to get subscribers, but that's only if you're going to continue publishing.

gerg_861
Jan 2, 2009


Well...I accidentally posted this to the whole creative convention forum and not this thread last night...doh. Anyhow, now posting in the right place.

I've just put my third novel up for pre-order on Amazon. I've used bargain booksy (good), BKknights (meh) previously to market my first two books. A lot of sites require quite a few positive reviews before you can advertise, but I really want this launch to make a splash. I'm willing to pay something extra to potentiahttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QWFJQT2ks together. A lot of the advice on advertising is from a couple of years ago, and I'm wondering if there is anything that would work well for a third book? Or am I better off just pumping ads on book 1 on the day of book 3's launch?

KrunkMcGrunk
Jul 2, 2007

Sometimes I sit and think, and sometimes I just sit.

gerg_861 posted:

Well...I accidentally posted this to the whole creative convention forum and not this thread last night...doh. Anyhow, now posting in the right place.

I've just put my third novel up for pre-order on Amazon. I've used bargain booksy (good), BKknights (meh) previously to market my first two books. A lot of sites require quite a few positive reviews before you can advertise, but I really want this launch to make a splash. I'm willing to pay something extra to potentiahttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QWFJQT2ks together. A lot of the advice on advertising is from a couple of years ago, and I'm wondering if there is anything that would work well for a third book? Or am I better off just pumping ads on book 1 on the day of book 3's launch?

You may give AMS Sponsored Product ads on your newest release a shot. I haven't tested this enough, but I believe the algo for placement is heavily weighted toward books less than 30 days old.

Just make sure you have it clearly marked as part of a series, so interested buyers can find book 1 as easily as possible.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

gerg_861 posted:

Well...I accidentally posted this to the whole creative convention forum and not this thread last night...doh. Anyhow, now posting in the right place.

I've just put my third novel up for pre-order on Amazon. I've used bargain booksy (good), BKknights (meh) previously to market my first two books. A lot of sites require quite a few positive reviews before you can advertise, but I really want this launch to make a splash. I'm willing to pay something extra to potentiahttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QWFJQT2ks together. A lot of the advice on advertising is from a couple of years ago, and I'm wondering if there is anything that would work well for a third book? Or am I better off just pumping ads on book 1 on the day of book 3's launch?

If you want to open up options at more newsletters, getting the requisite positive reviews is pretty easy with ARCs. In fact, you can use Booksprout to basically automate it. I think it costs $20 a month, but you just post your book and they find the reviewers. It's probably the next best thing to curating your own ARC list.

For the third book in the series, you should also consider a sale on books one and two, then drive traffic with ads/newsletters to the first book. If you have a mailing list you can probably arrange promo swaps with other authors in the same genre. Bookfunnel has a built in system for that which might be useful to you.

Bizarro Kanyon
Jan 3, 2007

Something Awful, so easy even a caveman can do it!



After I wrote my book a few years ago, my wife decided that she wanted to write a children’s book.

Is there any place online to where you can connect with an illustrator without it costing a poo poo ton of money?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Fiverr.com

gerg_861
Jan 2, 2009


Jalumibnkrayal posted:

If you want to open up options at more newsletters, getting the requisite positive reviews is pretty easy with ARCs. In fact, you can use Booksprout to basically automate it. I think it costs $20 a month, but you just post your book and they find the reviewers. It's probably the next best thing to curating your own ARC list.

For the third book in the series, you should also consider a sale on books one and two, then drive traffic with ads/newsletters to the first book. If you have a mailing list you can probably arrange promo swaps with other authors in the same genre. Bookfunnel has a built in system for that which might be useful to you.

This seems to be exactly what I was looking for. I used Librarything on my last book, but that was very labor intensive, and netted me 4 reviews out of a couple dozens ARCs sent. Thanks.

I'll also add that I just got the proof copy of my paperback version today from Amazon. I've used CreateSpace on the last two, and I feel like their Proof quality was much better than the KDP one that I received today. Also, it had a very ugly gray band saying "not for sale" on the front, which made it hard to evaluate the quality of the cover printing. From what I could see, the colors seemed muted. Inside the trim wasn't consistent on the pages. Not thrilled.

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divabot
Jun 17, 2015

Assisted Living Dracula of Wikipedia

DO NOT BELIEVE THIS MAN'S LIE!
Statist shill spreading FUD!

HODL!!


gerg_861 posted:

I'll also add that I just got the proof copy of my paperback version today from Amazon. I've used CreateSpace on the last two, and I feel like their Proof quality was much better than the KDP one that I received today. Also, it had a very ugly gray band saying "not for sale" on the front, which made it hard to evaluate the quality of the cover printing. From what I could see, the colors seemed muted. Inside the trim wasn't consistent on the pages. Not thrilled.

As I understand it, it's literally the same printers that CreateSpace used, but is also what I've heard about CreateSpace quality on its worst days, so ...

The trouble with four-colour printing is that it's goddamned lies by evil demons, and is never consistent. (This is why one uses a graphic designer who knows the evil that lurks within the heart of four-colour printing and will pick a schema that at least comes out usable in worst case.)

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