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Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

EngineerSean posted:

I should be able to provide you with some tips for your next work.

He's not joking. He spent a good amount of time with me fixing some stuff unrelated to this, so don't pass up this opportunity.

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ADBOT LOVES YOU

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Looks like Amazon is soon going to roll out Kindle Unlimited, a $9.99/month all-you-can-read program ala Scribd and Oyster. It looks like books that are part of KDP Select are automatically a part of Kindle Unlimited.

Edit: the graphic for the service also mentioned audio books.

Edit2: http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/07/16/amazon-launch-new-ebook-subscription-service-called-kindle-unlimited/#.U8cEmlZH1FK

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 23:03 on Jul 16, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

ArchangeI posted:

Any word if/how they are going to monetize that for the authors?


syscall girl posted:

I'm just doing napkin math here but it looks like $9.99 x n subscribers / infinity.

Unless they're willing to make it a subsidized loss leader in order to put Scribd/Oyster out of business, the payouts aren't going to be good. On the other hand, if their payouts are too low, people will just pull out of KDP Select and the service won't have any content.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

jazzyjay posted:

The Silent Circus
Ulis' childhood ended the night the planes burnt his city to ashes.

Orphaned, traumatised and mute, his only companion a fellow orphan named Lidyja, he flees Nazi death squads and Soviet partisans and is driven deeper into an ancient, malevolent forest.

Lost in an endless mire, they are rescued by the strange denizens of a circus hiding deep within the forest. For a while, Ulis and Lidyja think they are safe, having found a new family, a strange and peculiar family of Siamese twins and silent ape kings and freaks and mystics.

But the Ringmaster is dead and children soon learn that the war outside holds no monopoly on horror.

What genre will this be? Historical fantasy? Horror? What search terms does your audience put into Amazon to find new books? Can you pack your blurb full of those words? This seems to take place during World War II, yet if someone searches for "WW2 fiction" they might not see your book. As for the content of your blurb, Hemingwayapp.com has some suggestions on how to make it more readable. I'm also not a fan of your last sentence (it's convoluted).

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

A cool person posted:

Hey all, so I finally bit the self publishing bullet. Making my crime/thriller/noir whatever book free on Amazon from now until Monday if any of y'all want to check it out.



http://www.amazon.com/The-Opportunist-Ray-Altman-ebook/dp/B00LP0O03W/ref=cm_cmu_up_thanks_hdr


Any feedback would be killer

I downloaded this to my kindle, and noticed some formatting issues:

1. The spacing between lines is too generous. An average paragraph takes up the entire screen of my paperwhite.
2. Your alignment is "right ragged". Consider going fully justified instead.

Looks like you have a shot at breaking top 20 for Crime novels. Congrats!

Edit: And it looks like they rolled out Kindle Unlimited to the US. Upped the global fund to 2mil for July as well. Lets see how big these crumbs are.

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 14:22 on Jul 18, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

A cool person posted:

Thanks for the input. Messed with the settings and I think I fixed it. First time using calibre to convert the source doc and I'm kind of retarded when it comes to that stuff

I ended up doing the same thing with my books so I'm sensitive to it. ;)

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

BKnights on Fiverr has a mini Bookbub gig. He sends your book link out to 4800 people for $5. The first time I used him it was for a full price short romance story and it got no sales, so he refunded me. Since then I published another work, got some reviews on it, tweaked the blurb and decided to try Bknights again. It's not primetime in the US yet and it's already my best sales day. Mind you, these are tiny numbers, but to me it's a big deal. Thanks for being awesome, thread!

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Published my third short story yesterday, and I'm about a third of the way done with my next one. What's everyone working on?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Yooper posted:

Could I get a blurb check?

The only thing I didn't like was the last sentence. The second sentence implies high stakes and drama (finding a new enemy), but then the last sentence is more about a career decision, and that seems like lower stakes.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

When do we find out about the KU payment rate? When does Amazon usually update the month's global fund?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Grammaton posted:

Is 2k to 10k the best book to read to improve your writing process? I've gotten a lot of good ideas from it. (I've also found four mistakes in it. Maybe I should become an editor instead of a writer.)

I've found it to be pretty good wrt to the mechanics of improving your output. As for motivation to put my rear end in the chair, I liked both The War of Art (Steven Pressfield) and Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (Mason Currey). The latter is more of a peak into historical figures and their often eccentric processes. Midday naps seem to be a somewhat common component, for what it's worth.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

I had three romance short stories up for free over the weekend. Gave away about 3k copies. Hit #1 in some small categories and #3 in a very large category. Now we'll see if any sales come of it. Author ranking hit top 500 for a microsecond, so that was exciting.

Sorry if this is all mundane drudgery for you old hands: I'm still a stupid newbie and everything is new and great!

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

EB Nulshit posted:

Is short romance a thing that sells? My mom is writing short erotica but she'd much prefer to write straight-up romance.

I think the main draw of romance is the development of the relationship between the main character and their love interest. That would be hard to explore satisfactorily in a short story length. However, I think there are some folks who write serialized romance (there's a huge thread about it on Kboards here http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,184087.0.html). That might be one way to write smaller 15-20k word romance stories but have them continue along a much larger plot arc.

Your mom sounds awesome.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

KDP banner at the top says the August Global Fund is $2mil. I guess Amazon is anticipating a lot of people to bail Kindle Unlimited after the free month.

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 01:29 on Aug 8, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

quote:

Dear KDP Author,

Just ahead of World War II, there was a radical invention that shook the foundations of book publishing. It was the paperback book. This was a time when movie tickets cost 10 or 20 cents, and books cost $2.50. The new paperback cost 25 cents -- it was ten times cheaper. Readers loved the paperback and millions of copies were sold in just the first year.

With it being so inexpensive and with so many more people able to afford to buy and read books, you would think the literary establishment of the day would have celebrated the invention of the paperback, yes? Nope. Instead, they dug in and circled the wagons. They believed low cost paperbacks would destroy literary culture and harm the industry (not to mention their own bank accounts). Many bookstores refused to stock them, and the early paperback publishers had to use unconventional methods of distribution -- places like newsstands and drugstores. The famous author George Orwell came out publicly and said about the new paperback format, if "publishers had any sense, they would combine against them and suppress them." Yes, George Orwell was suggesting collusion.

Well... history doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme.

Fast forward to today, and it's the e-book's turn to be opposed by the literary establishment. Amazon and Hachette -- a big US publisher and part of a $10 billion media conglomerate -- are in the middle of a business dispute about e-books. We want lower e-book prices. Hachette does not. Many e-books are being released at $14.99 and even $19.99. That is unjustifiably high for an e-book. With an e-book, there's no printing, no over-printing, no need to forecast, no returns, no lost sales due to out of stock, no warehousing costs, no transportation costs, and there is no secondary market -- e-books cannot be resold as used books. E-books can and should be less expensive.

Perhaps channeling Orwell's decades old suggestion, Hachette has already been caught illegally colluding with its competitors to raise e-book prices. So far those parties have paid $166 million in penalties and restitution. Colluding with its competitors to raise prices wasn't only illegal, it was also highly disrespectful to Hachette's readers.

The fact is many established incumbents in the industry have taken the position that lower e-book prices will "devalue books" and hurt "Arts and Letters." They're wrong. Just as paperbacks did not destroy book culture despite being ten times cheaper, neither will e-books. On the contrary, paperbacks ended up rejuvenating the book industry and making it stronger. The same will happen with e-books.

Many inside the echo-chamber of the industry often draw the box too small. They think books only compete against books. But in reality, books compete against mobile games, television, movies, Facebook, blogs, free news sites and more. If we want a healthy reading culture, we have to work hard to be sure books actually are competitive against these other media types, and a big part of that is working hard to make books less expensive.

Moreover, e-books are highly price elastic. This means that when the price goes down, customers buy much more. We've quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would sell 1.74 copies if priced at $9.99. So, for example, if customers would buy 100,000 copies of a particular e-book at $14.99, then customers would buy 174,000 copies of that same e-book at $9.99. Total revenue at $14.99 would be $1,499,000. Total revenue at $9.99 is $1,738,000. The important thing to note here is that the lower price is good for all parties involved: the customer is paying 33% less and the author is getting a royalty check 16% larger and being read by an audience that's 74% larger. The pie is simply bigger.

But when a thing has been done a certain way for a long time, resisting change can be a reflexive instinct, and the powerful interests of the status quo are hard to move. It was never in George Orwell's interest to suppress paperback books -- he was wrong about that.

And despite what some would have you believe, authors are not united on this issue. When the Authors Guild recently wrote on this, they titled their post: "Amazon-Hachette Debate Yields Diverse Opinions Among Authors" (the comments to this post are worth a read). A petition started by another group of authors and aimed at Hachette, titled "Stop Fighting Low Prices and Fair Wages," garnered over 7,600 signatures. And there are myriad articles and posts, by authors and readers alike, supporting us in our effort to keep prices low and build a healthy reading culture. Author David Gaughran's recent interview is another piece worth reading.

We recognize that writers reasonably want to be left out of a dispute between large companies. Some have suggested that we "just talk." We tried that. Hachette spent three months stonewalling and only grudgingly began to even acknowledge our concerns when we took action to reduce sales of their titles in our store. Since then Amazon has made three separate offers to Hachette to take authors out of the middle. We first suggested that we (Amazon and Hachette) jointly make author royalties whole during the term of the dispute. Then we suggested that authors receive 100% of all sales of their titles until this dispute is resolved. Then we suggested that we would return to normal business operations if Amazon and Hachette's normal share of revenue went to a literacy charity. But Hachette, and their parent company Lagardere, have quickly and repeatedly dismissed these offers even though e-books represent 1% of their revenues and they could easily agree to do so. They believe they get leverage from keeping their authors in the middle.

We will never give up our fight for reasonable e-book prices. We know making books more affordable is good for book culture. We'd like your help. Please email Hachette and copy us.

Hachette CEO, Michael Pietsch: Michael.Pietsch@hbgusa.com

Copy us at: readers-united@amazon.com

Please consider including these points:

- We have noted your illegal collusion. Please stop working so hard to overcharge for ebooks. They can and should be less expensive.
- Lowering e-book prices will help -- not hurt -- the reading culture, just like paperbacks did.
- Stop using your authors as leverage and accept one of Amazon's offers to take them out of the middle.
- Especially if you're an author yourself: Remind them that authors are not united on this issue.

Thanks for your support.

The Amazon Books Team

P.S. You can also find this letter at https://www.readersunited.com

Apparently tons of authors are getting this sent to them at the email address they registered with KDP.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Nessus posted:

Has anyone had much success with children's or YA books published through Kindle or similar? I have an idea, which would perhaps best be compared to the early Potter books or Lemony Snicket, and which I think could do rather well. But I don't know if that market actually exists or not for e-publishing. Any experiences?

No personal experience, but YA stuff does very well. Just browse the categories in Amazon. Children's books (ala Dr. Seuss) don't do as well in ebook format because little kids drop them and pour applesauce on them, so physical is better.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Nessus posted:

Awesome. Is there any issue, as far as Amazon is concerned anyway, with having works under multiple pen names on one account?

Not that I know of, but I just have the one pen name right now.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

July KDP sales reports are posted. I'm showing $1.805 per KU/KOLL. I really hope that rate holds for August.

quote:

Hello,

Since you are enrolled in KDP Select, we wanted you to know about some important updates regarding the global fund.

Kindle Unlimited (KU) is off to a great start with a strong early response from customers. Due to this early surge in demand, we are adding a KU "launch bonus" of $500,000 to the KDP Select global fund for July 2014. This is on top of the base fund amount of $2 million in July. This brings the total funds paid on borrows to $2.5 million, which is more than double the size of payments in June.

We also have news about how KU and Kindle Owners' Lending Library (KOLL) borrows appear in your reports. Since KU launched, our reports have been showing KOLL downloads plus all KU books *opened*, instead of books read to 10%. As previously announced, we plan to pay royalties on books read to 10%. We apologize for any confusion this created. In the next few days, we plan to backfill our reporting to reflect borrows in this manner (KOLL downloads + KU books read to 10%).

For July we have decided to extend payment to all KU books downloaded and opened in July, even those not read past 10%. To support this, we will add an additional $285,000 in July payments, making the funds paid to authors in July $2,785,000.

Key points about recent fund activity
- Your July payment report shows your total earnings, including the additional funds paid during July for books opened and borrowed but not read to 10%.
- Next week, we will update all other KDP reporting for July and August to show KOLL downloads plus Kindle Unlimited borrows that have been read past 10%.
- Even after we backfill all other reports, your July Prior Month Royalty report will remain showing all KOLL downloads plus all Kindle Unlimited borrows that were opened in July, including those not read to 10%. All future reports, including future Prior Month Royalty reports, will reflect KOLL downloads plus KU borrows read past 10%.
- If a book was opened but not read to 10% in July but does pass 10% after July, you will also receive credit for the borrow when that happens.

For August, we will pay authors for KOLL borrows upon download and Kindle Unlimited borrows read past 10%.

Best regards,
The Kindle Direct Publishing Team

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 21:48 on Aug 14, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Nessus posted:

Huh. Well, that makes sense I suppose. What fields are you writing in, moana?

And for that matter, how do you go about setting up a mailing list? I've heard that mentioned a few times, is there some tool or service for it online?

Mailchimp.com is mentioned a lot as being free (for up to 2,000 subscribers) and easy to manage. There's also TinyLetter.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

ravenkult posted:

A story of identity and redemption, satanic cults and funny bunny slippers, The Mind is a Razorblade is the deformed lovechild of a lunatic raised on cheesy ‘80’s science fiction movies.

I liked the blurb till I got to this part. It's kinda random and seems to undermine the paragraph before it, which was suspenseful. Plus I don't know why I have to hear about the author's depiction of himself. I also want to know more about the antagonistic force(s).

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

mostkillingest posted:

My wife recently self-published and I need some good ideas on how to help her get the word out. It is a light sci-fi novel.

http://www.amazon.com/Violet-Veterox-A-Crouch-ebook/dp/B00MR4T7E2

Blurb:
Twenty-five years ago, a virulent strain of the influenza virus emerged. It tore across the world, ravaged the population, and viciously killed three-and-a-half billion people. Evangeline’s parent’s survived. Five years after it ended, during society’s ascent back to normalcy, she was born. She’d grown up reading about the plague in books and hearing somber stories from the people surrounding her. She often wondered what it would be like to survive a pandemic or catastrophic event, being forced to watch as all of one’s family and friends died along the way. She never anticipated having to answer the question, but fate would cruelly propel her into responding and the resulting inferno would engulf her entire life.


There is also a sample at smashwords.

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/467543

Please let me know how I can help her move her effort to the next level.

1. The cover doesn't say post-apoc to me. It says medical romance/chick lit. The blurb sounds a LOT like Hugh Howey's Wool series (which is great because people are going buttfuck for those books). I would probably aim for an orange/red cover, maybe a desolate landscape.
2. I don't know what a Veterox is, so the title doesn't help me out. The term isn't defined in the blurb either. Is it the name of the virus? Is it an alien species?
3. Plug the blurb into hemingwayapp.com. The last sentence is especially hard to parse. I would do shorter sentences.
4. "pandemic or catastrophic event" Pick one. Make a strong choice.
5. The blurb seems to state as a fact that all her friends and family are going to die. If that's what the story is about, I think it should be pitched as the stakes of the book: Can Evangeline save everyone around her, etc? Entice me with the notion that everything hangs in the balance, and if the main character fails everyone dies.
6. The wording of the blurb is very passive. She's forced, cruelly propelled, etc. I'd rather the main character have agency. Tell me what she wants and the things she does to get them. If she's just a victim of fate...that's a tough sell.
7. I'm not seeing a pagecount or wordcount. I don't know if it's a 10k word short or a 200k word epic. Amazon usually automatically puts in the pagecount so I'm not sure why it's not showing up.

People will pick up your book if the title, cover, and blurb all match up to what they want. Genre fiction has expectations: meet them. But to specifically answer your question, I'd put it up for free then market it to all the websites that do promos for that genre. Then I'd go to Fiverr and pay BKnights $5 to promote it to his email list. I did that with my short over the weekend and got around 900 downloads. I wouldn't spend more than a day on this: more time than that should go into the next book. Nothing will be better marketing than the next book.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Mr. Pumroy posted:

Even before her parents' tumultuous divorce,

Divorces are lovely by default, so I'd ditch tumultuous unless you are going to key into something really traumatic or painful about the divorce.

quote:

But when her father's insurance company transfers him to the city of Bybridge she must grapple with an entirely new level of culture shock.

This is a little hard to parse. Maybe add a comma after Bybridge or tighten it up a little? Grammar's not my strong suit. But I'm a dummy and I know when it's hard for a dummy to read.

quote:

Bybridge, a city on an artificial island off the coast of New Jersey, is home to the world's largest population of superhumans, aliens, and other strange and aberrant folk.

Tighten up the end of this sentence. Strange and aberrant are synonymous so choose one. It will also let you ditch that last "and" which throws the reader for a loop.

quote:

However, it's Carrie who's declared the anomaly when the city government declares her a security risk.

Too many declares and the sentence structure is too passive.

quote:

Then her father is kidnapped by a rampaging robot. It's a bad start to what was supposed to be a new life. Carrie must save her father from a grisly fate in the forgotten ruins far below the city,

First sentence is short and seems like a throwaway. Second sentence is stating the obvious. Third sentence FINALLY gets good because Carrie is doing something. How about you turn all the above into "When her father is kidnapped by a rampaging robot, Carrie must save him from a grisly fate in the forgotten ruins far below the city."

quote:

aided only by the undead, a mad scientist-in-training and a pack of insane chefs.

"Aided only by...., Carrie has to [overcome obstacle, defeat badguy, face ghost from her past, etc] or [the highest stakes you can feasibly frame your story around]"

quote:

After that comes the hard part: having a heart-to-heart talk with her father that doesn't end in a shouting match.

This relieves the plot tension in a way that I don't like. It's fine if this is the overarching theme of the book, but I don't think it helps the reader to know this in the blurb. Star Wars wasn't sold on "and then he finds out who his dad is."

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

mostkillingest posted:

My wife rewrote her blurb to try to address some of the concerns that were brought up. The cover was already finished in the blue tone and actually looks pretty good on a print on demand cover. She had ordered a proof.

A cover can look pretty good but work against you if it doesn't meet the readers' expectations.

quote:

Evangeline is ordinary. She lives an ordinary life. Her friends and family are ordinary. Only one of these statements turn out to be true. At twenty years old, Evangeline Rolieux has an idyllic life. She understands how lucky she is, being born just five years after a pandemic. Her parents were survivors of the infamous influenza virus that swept through the world and ravaged the population, killing three-and-a-half-billion people. She’s read about it in books and has heard the stories, but a spark, lit from a simple history assignment, sets fire to her curiosity and pushes her to delve deeper. Soon she’s tumbling down a path towards a startling discovery that may destroy everything she cares for. Unbeknownst to her, the currency for this knowledge will be exchanged in blood, and it’s far more than exists in her body.

Light this blurb on fire and start again. Is this really a romance?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

September KU/KOLL payout pool set at $3 million.

Yooper posted:

Polishing the draft on my next novel. What do you guys think of the blurb?

It's a story about dogs on a planet, and the protagonist has an ancient sentience? Are the dogs pets of the people who flew the crashed starship, or did the dogs fly the starship? It's an unusual premise, not sure how I feel about an animal protagonist.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Imperfect posted:

Is this even close to a good idea? Oh, and sci-fi - is that just a bad idea from the start?

I'd say focus on the novel, and put serious thought into expanding it into a series. Readers want series: it inspires confidence in the quality of the product and if they like the first one, they'll pick up the rest. Especially with sci-fi and fantasy, which are notorious for worldbuilding. I don't want to read a hundred pages of description of how one particular universe works if it's a standalone book.

The op features at least one goon who has found great success writing sci-fi, so that's no impediment.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

A1989 Honda Accord posted:

"In the town of Cyprus Grove everyone has a secret. Even the dead. Three children explore a myriad of dark happenings in this first collection of stories. Many towns tried to get back to normal in the years following the civil war. For Cyprus Grove, there is no normal.

That all looks good.

quote:

In "Gifts and Nightmares" a sinister snake oil salesman provides a young girl, Rebekah, a music box.

How about "...salesman gives a music box to young Rebekah." Parses much easier.

quote:

"Watchers of the Field" has Jacob and his neighbor take an up close look at some scarecrows that are more than they seem.

I don't like "take an up close look at". Would "investigate" suffice? Also, could you be more specific about why they are being looked at closely? Do they move when you're not looking at them? Do they attract crows? In your previous two summaries you give some good tasty details for readers to bite into. This one is pretty vague.

quote:

They will have to escape the corn field or be lost to the monstrosities. "

I don't care for "lost to the monstrosities."

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme


If you want strangers to buy/read your book, hire someone to make your cover. They can be had for as little as $5 and will look significantly better than this.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

August KU/KOLL rate is $1.54/borrow. The total payouts were $4.7 million. There's also a new KDP All Stars program. Top 100 authors and titles get payout bonuses.

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 20:40 on Sep 15, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Does it make sense to change keyword strategy after the initial launch blitz? When I put out a new work, I'll target the keywords towards a bunch of different subcategories that the work would fit into. Then when it goes free and I market it, it often tops those genre charts for a few days, then slowly falls into obscurity. Once it's out of the top 100 or whatever, I don't think anyone is going to find it by browsing the categories. I think what I should be doing at that point is more SEO style keywords to land on lists of books when people put in specific search terms.

Any opinions on this?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

EngineerSean posted:

I'm going to tell you the truth. At this point your best marketing strategy is to wrote more.

I concur, doing that as well. :)

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Sundae posted:

There are some algorithmic reasons not to use it, if anyone cares for details.

It's something to do with pre-orders not helping with sales rank once your book goes live, right?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Sundae posted:

I'll certainly give it a shot. :)

EngineerSean posted:

As I stated in my explanation, this is obviously a pipe dream for your average mere self pub and should not factor into your decision. I'm going to quote the exceptions I had from my post, apologies to Milly Taiden if she ever reads this (I doubt she's a goon though)

You guys are seriously awesome and an inspiration. Could anyone speak to how free book "sales" factor in all this? I've heard anecdotally that you want to end your KDP Select free promotion manually during book sale prime time. Otherwise it likely expires when your target market is asleep and your ranking sinks faster. Does this sound right?

Just published the first in a new series today. Hopefully this one will perform better than the one I wrapped up last week.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

http://the-digital-reader.com/2014/09/22/amazon-publishing-crowd-source-next-books-now-recruiting-kdp-authors/#.VCDJLPRH3Vq

quote:

Late last week Amazon started sending out emails to KDP authors, informing them of a new program which Amazon plans to launch soon. According to the email, which was forwarded to me by author Angela Kulig and by Amazon's pr dept, when the new program launches authors will be welcomed to submit their unpublished book to what I would describe as a crowd sourcing program.

Details are still scarce, but the email did say that it will work like this:

Authors will be asked to submit their complete, never-before-published book and cover.
After a few days, we will post the first pages of each book on a new website for readers to preview and nominate their favorites.
Books with the most nominations will be reviewed by our team for potential publication.

quote:

Guaranteed advance & competitive royalties: You will receive a guaranteed $1,500 advance and 50% royalties on net eBook revenue.
Focused formats: We acquire worldwide publication rights for eBook and audio formats in all languages. You retain all other rights, including print.
5-year renewable terms, $5,000 in royalties: If your book doesn't earn $5,000 in royalties during your initial 5-year contract term, and any 5-year renewal term after that, you can choose to stop publishing with us.
Easy reversions: After two years, your rights in any format or language that remains unpublished, or all rights for any book that earns less than $500 in total royalties in the preceding 12-month period, can be reverted upon request -- no questions asked.
Early downloads & reviews: One week prior to release date, everyone who nominated your book will receive a free, early copy to help build momentum and customer reviews.
Featured Amazon marketing: Your book will be enrolled into the Kindle Owners' Lending Library, Kindle Unlimited as well as be eligible for targeted email campaigns and promotions.

WTF is Amazon smoking? Who is going to bring their book to retail finish by themselves then give it to Amazon for $1500 and less royalties than KDP? The special targeted emails and promos would have to be incredible.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

EngineerSean posted:

I mean this is more along the lines of "a traditional publishing company can do absolutely nothing for me" which is said sometimes in self publishing circles but is absolutely wrong. Would you pay for cover design even though you can put words on a picture? Would you allow somebody to self publish for you if they were an expert on visibility and kept part of the profit? If no, why not? There is a decent chance (almost 100%) that Amazon handling your publishing would more than double your sales.

It will be interesting to see more details as they roll this program out. I'll rescind my prior scorn. Forgive me, Jeff Bezos.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Elfforkusu posted:

... this will probably end up being free at some point, so don't buy it! (I am bad at marketing)

Joke's on you, it's free right now for us Kindle Unlimited subscribers. Get you a KU borrow!

Although you should reformat the blurb. It's all scrunched up on the left hand side, making it look like a poem.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Elfforkusu posted:

And... it's free for Kindle Unlimited people?

Anything in KDP Select is available in KU, which is like Netflix for books. Around October 15 we'll all find out how much we get paid per borrow (for the month of September). If you were expecting a fraction of $0.99, you should be pleasantly surprised.

Backmatter question: At the end of my stories I have Amazon links to my other stories. When I click these links on my Kindle it says "this mobile site doesn't allow you to purchase". It lets me add the items to my wishlist but I have to complete the transaction on a computer. Is this normal? Is there a link I can use to let my customers buy stories on their e-reader?

Edit2: Amazon launched Kindle Unlimited in the UK today.

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 15:58 on Sep 24, 2014

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme


My main concern about the cover is that in a smaller icon the mountain looks like a tree stump. This is compounded by the grass in the foreground and the feathers. I don't know if this would have any impact, but if your book is about a boy traversing a dangerous maze under a cathedral...I'm not getting that from this cover. The feathers especially seem very whimsical.

Blurb: The first two sentences I don't care for. Personally I like to know who is having thoughts before being told said thoughts. The blurb starts to get good with the setup about the maze and limited time with the torch. But the very next sentence says he makes it through, so that anticipation is now gone. Could you instead say it's rumored that a whole world exists beyond etc? The "He could learn..." sentence doesn't pose any stakes or conflict, and it reads as passive as "I could get up and change the channel."

And the last sentence is boring. It's way too early for me to care what this character is trying to prove to himself. Is there a tangible benefit if he succeeds? Is there a dire consequence if he fails?

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

DukeRustfield posted:

Well, I guess it depends on what you're shooting for. I will say it works quite well as a business plan in nearly any business. If you apply to a company, let's say Google, and tell them, "I just do what everyone else does," you won't get the job. If you tell your prospective agent, "I just want to make C+ grade work," s/he is likely not going to be interested.

There's a huge gulf between making carbon copy poo poo and being an A#1 blockbuster overlord.

These are not apt analogies. Would you spend months or years honing yourself for an interview at Google without knowing what Google was looking for? That's ridiculous.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Kindle Scout has launched.

https://kindlescout.amazon.com/about#how-it-works-authors

Looks like you can only submit Romance, Mystery, and Sci-Fi/Fantasy. They also upped the auto-renewal threshold from $5k to $25k every five years.

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Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

September borrow rate is $1.518, a little higher than I was expecting.

Edit: UK borrow rate is £1.27 ($2.07).

Jalumibnkrayal fucked around with this message at 19:13 on Oct 15, 2014

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