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Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

ulvir posted:

I heavily recommend going further. I would’ve suggested the translation I’m reading, but I’m not sure learning Norwegian in order to read Proust is too worthwhile an endeavour

I want to

I do

It's my sweet sisyphean sleep book

Each attempt ends, I'm passed out, asleep, beautiful smile on my face, the book fallen from my torpid hands, place irrevocably lost

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coathat
May 21, 2007



A real treat for Proust readers is the book Paintings in Proust. It has all the paintings he mentions during the books. A magnificent companion.

Mokelumne Trekka
Nov 22, 2015

Soon.


Reading The Razor's Edge and it is nothing remarkable. Something this straightforward and 'just ok' helps balance out my slow-reading of Ulysses.

I know we all hate Christopher Hitchens now but I found his quote about W. Somerset Maugham funny:

quote:

Maugham eventually received an honor from the Crown—but it was for "services to literature," rather than for literature itself, and this distinction represents all the difference in the world.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Mokelumne Trekka posted:

Reading The Razor's Edge and it is nothing remarkable. Something this straightforward and 'just ok' helps balance out my slow-reading of Ulysses.

I know we all hate Christopher Hitchens now but I found his quote about W. Somerset Maugham funny:

Just the other day I was looking at my bookshelf and thought: "has anyone actually read Maugham since the 1900s?" I guess the answer is: at least one person.

e: Two.

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




I have a big Collected Short Stories of W. Somerset Maugham from 1934 that I got at a fleamarket years ago, but I only got around to reading one or two of the stories. Idk if that counts

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Carthag Tuek posted:

I have a big Collected Short Stories of W. Somerset Maugham from 1934 that I got at a fleamarket years ago, but I only got around to reading one or two of the stories. Idk if that counts

I only have The Painted Veil and Razor's Edge. I read the former, thought "oh this is like Greene but boring" and never started on the latter. (I'll get to it eventually.)

artism
Nov 22, 2011



reading a biography about Samuel Beckett by Anthony Cronin while re-reading Molloy. I’d like to have met Sam the golfer, who loved Ode to the Nightingale.

started and stopped Tristram Shandy after a five page hobby-horse pun. merits closer reading

maybe I’ll start Fourth Mansions since I loved Pasr Master so much

artism fucked around with this message at 13:14 on May 5, 2021

artism
Nov 22, 2011



on the subject of Molloy, there’s a great fuss over small windows and sometimes I wonder if I have even that. on the other hand, fart arithmetic was well understood and an admirable use of the sciences.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Recommended The Poor Mouth to a coworker a few months ago and found out today that she bought it and really liked it.

Burning Rain
Jul 17, 2006

What's happening?!?!


artism posted:

reading a biography about Samuel Beckett by Anthony Cronin while re-reading Molloy. I’d like to have met Sam the golfer, who loved Ode to the Nightingale.

started and stopped Tristram Shandy after a five page hobby-horse pun. merits closer reading

maybe I’ll start Fourth Mansions since I loved Pasr Master so much

reading Beckett's stories & texts for nothing over here

he wasn't kidding with the title

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Burning Rain posted:

reading Beckett's stories & texts for nothing over here

he wasn't kidding with the title

there are so many ideas expressed and dismissed within the same breath that if you read it before bed you’re sure to go sleepless for want of understanding. but in the end I somehow feel better about my ignorance. for now, at 30

I also feel slightly better that I’ve chosen to act, however trivially, to the extent that I am able, rather than to think, inasmuch as I am able, lacking the capacity

e: is there a particularly good, or recognized, biblical concordance for the KJV? guessing it's 'Strong's Exhaustive Concordance'

artism fucked around with this message at 20:12 on May 6, 2021

FPyat
Jan 17, 2020


I read The Crying of Lot 49 today. It felt very fresh in its style despite its age. The plot summary of the stage play was a particular highlight.

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



if I wanted to read sir phillip sydney's arcadia what's the best version?

thehoodie
Feb 8, 2011


Have a long road trip ahead. What's a good audio book (preferably available on google play)?

blue squares
Sep 28, 2007

Dallas Mavericks
Dallas Stars

thehoodie posted:

Have a long road trip ahead. What's a good audio book (preferably available on google play)?

A Brief History of Seven Killings

Each character is narrated by an actor with the correct regional/class accent and it really brings the text alive.

mdemone
Mar 14, 2001

There is no route out of the maze. The maze shifts as you move through it, because it is alive.




blue squares posted:

A Brief History of Seven Killings

Each character is narrated by an actor with the correct regional/class accent and it really brings the text alive.

Fuuuuck now I'm gonna get this

Segue
May 23, 2007


Echoing for Seven Killings that yeah I was partway through the book when I started the audiobook and it's amazing. His follow-up fantasy novel is a bit of a mess unfortunately, but at least he tries to branch out.

Finished At Swim Two Birds on this thread's recommendation and while I was pretty lukewarm at first once it starts devolving into chaos it's delightful. It's weird O'Brien isn't very well known in North America; my only friend who'd heard of him did her undergrad at Oxford. Can't wait for Third Policeman.

Mr. Nemo
Feb 4, 2016

A roc and a hard place



Segue posted:

Echoing for Seven Killings that yeah I was partway through the book when I started the audiobook and it's amazing. His follow-up fantasy novel is a bit of a mess unfortunately, but at least he tries to branch out.

I'm more of a reader of sci-fi rather than serious lit, so I appreciated that he at least tried to bring a fresh perspective to the fantasy genre. Very unique world building (come at me) based on sources not frequently seen.

I've had seven killings on my radar ever since, but every time i look at the page count i put it off a while longer.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Segue posted:

Echoing for Seven Killings that yeah I was partway through the book when I started the audiobook and it's amazing. His follow-up fantasy novel is a bit of a mess unfortunately, but at least he tries to branch out.

Finished At Swim Two Birds on this thread's recommendation and while I was pretty lukewarm at first once it starts devolving into chaos it's delightful. It's weird O'Brien isn't very well known in North America; my only friend who'd heard of him did her undergrad at Oxford. Can't wait for Third Policeman.

Some guys have an O'Brien theme night every year at a friend's bar. No idea why.

Carly Gay Dead Son
Aug 27, 2007

Bonus.


thehoodie posted:

Have a long road trip ahead. What's a good audio book (preferably available on google play)?

I recommend Norm MacDonald's Based on a True Story: Not A Memoir, narrated by the author.

Global Disorder
Jan 9, 2020


3D Megadoodoo posted:

Just the other day I was looking at my bookshelf and thought: "has anyone actually read Maugham since the 1900s?" I guess the answer is: at least one person.

e: Two.

(raises hand) I read Ashenden recently. Kinda liked it. It's a series of loosely connected WW1 spy stories, though the mood is completely different from Greenmantle or The Thirty-Nine Steps. Maugham is very cynical about the futility of it all, in a way that reminded me of John Le Carré.
And it's got a character called the Hairless Mexican.

Ashenden posted:

"I'm expecting a fellow to come and see me to-night," he said at last. "His train gets in about ten." He gave his wrist-watch a glance. "He's known as the Hairless Mexican."

"Why?"

"Because he's hairless and because he's a Mexican."

"The explanation seems perfectly satisfactory," said Ashenden.

artism
Nov 22, 2011



Segue posted:

Finished At Swim Two Birds on this thread's recommendation and while I was pretty lukewarm at first once it starts devolving into chaos it's delightful. It's weird O'Brien isn't very well known in North America; my only friend who'd heard of him did her undergrad at Oxford. Can't wait for Third Policeman.

love the narrator so much. he’s such a smug little twerp. and of course the three wise men constantly interjecting as Finn drones on. and of course the inestimable Jem Casey

Carly Gay Dead Son posted:

I recommend Norm MacDonald's Based on a True Story: Not A Memoir, narrated by the author.

seconding

artism fucked around with this message at 05:46 on May 10, 2021

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Global Disorder posted:

(raises hand) I read Ashenden recently. Kinda liked it. It's a series of loosely connected WW1 spy stories, though the mood is completely different from Greenmantle or The Thirty-Nine Steps. Maugham is very cynical about the futility of it all, in a way that reminded me of John Le Carré.
And it's got a character called the Hairless Mexican.

The Hideo Kojima school of character-naming.

Anyway I'm beginning to think The Painted Veil might be his One Really poo poo Book. Kind of like A Farewell to Arms for Hemingway

(JK it's Death in the Afternoon, obviously.)

Sarern
Nov 4, 2008


Won't you take me to
Bomertown?
Won't you take me to
BONERTOWN?



I finished Pale Fire and it owned, what Nabokov should I read next?

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment
I wouldn't have any appointment.



Grimey Drawer

Sarern posted:

I finished Pale Fire and it owned, what Nabokov should I read next?

Lolita, or Ada, or Ador. Pnin for something a little less reader-intensive.

TrixRabbi
Aug 20, 2010

Time for a little robot chauvinism!



Started Berg by Ann Quin and it's very much got Beckett vibes in terms of how she approaches and plays with language and the lurid family/sexual themes. Took a little to get into the groove of the prose but very much enjoying it.

derp
Jan 21, 2010

when i get up all i want to do is go to bed again

Lipstick Apathy

Sarern posted:

I finished Pale Fire and it owned, what Nabokov should I read next?

I agree Lolita is a must read, but just fair warning its nothing like Pale Fire in terms of tone (sorry if i'm being patronizing, but you never know what people know) it's extremely dark and hosed up, sickening even. also in my top ten or even top 5 favorite books, but not a light read at all.

If you enjoyed the schadenfreude of pale fire, another underrated one with similar lols is Despair. I almost never hear anyone talk about it, but it was also hilarious.

Oxxidation
Jul 22, 2007


Sarern posted:

I finished Pale Fire and it owned, what Nabokov should I read next?

invitation to a beheading

PsychedelicWarlord
Sep 8, 2016




derp posted:

I agree Lolita is a must read, but just fair warning its nothing like Pale Fire in terms of tone (sorry if i'm being patronizing, but you never know what people know) it's extremely dark and hosed up, sickening even. also in my top ten or even top 5 favorite books, but not a light read at all.

If you enjoyed the schadenfreude of pale fire, another underrated one with similar lols is Despair. I almost never hear anyone talk about it, but it was also hilarious.

Despair is my favorite Nabokov! Incredible book.

Segue
May 23, 2007


artism posted:

love the narrator so much. he’s such a smug little twerp. and of course the three wise men constantly interjecting as Finn drones on. and of course the inestimable Jem Casey

He had that Ignatius Reilly vibe but lazier and less aggressive, I think that's what put me off at first before warming.

Jem Casey's poem was amazing.

The ending paragraph is just a work of art. By god the last bit is bloody though.

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artism
Nov 22, 2011



he’s nowhere near as lazy as Ignatius, though just as disdainful of those he relies upon. at least he produces something. I guess Ignatius studied Boethius.

just reread the final paragraph and agree. except that I do know the thoughts that flit across a fool’s head, and have a healthy cynicism for the sciences

artism fucked around with this message at 20:42 on May 11, 2021

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