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Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

If nothing else, hopefully Del Toro's visual sensibilities coming through in the new Silent Hill could be enough to make it feel new yet familiar. "Scary" is debatable, but even if Stanley Kubrick was helming the thing no one is ever fully satisfied with how "scary" most games are these days. Mood and a general atmosphere of dread tends to be the thing that sticks with ya anyway from those games, and dread is something I thought Pan's Labyrinth delivered excellently.

Speaking of horror games in general though, a few months ago I spent a weekend creating a little experimental horror game of my own, but haven't really touched it since then. With that said, hardly anyone has actually played it so if any of ya'll horror fans are interested and up for something a little weird, feel free to give it a try, and let me know what ya think! I hesitate to call it "finished" since there's only so much there, but hey, it's experimental and free so what's the harm?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/qk1y4uhr0mddudk/A%20Wonderful%20Day%20for%20Fishing.zip?dl=0

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Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Pochoclo posted:

If you don't mind my feedback, the pacing feels too slow, and the payback just didn't make it for me - also eating and releasing seem to be the same action effect-wise, and the only transformation seems to be the sea bass tar eyes thing, and I saw a big mouth flash for a second on my face... rather anti-climactic in that it was too much of the same for half an hour and then I felt like I wasted my time. Also, the tar eyes thing seems like a toggle - you eat/release two tar bass in a row and you go back to normal. Or eat/release anything else. It would be more unsettling if the transformations accumulated slowly and there was no way to get rid of them and the background started changing too - like a downward unstoppable spiral into madness. Also have the eat/release choice actually mean something.

Also there seems to be no way to exit the game from within the game, had to kill the task.

I appreciate the feedback! I do like your idea of having the effects accumulate rather than come and go. I'm also realizing that the buildup and pacing is being very negatively affected by some of the randomized elements I threw in there. The events don't play out the same every time, but I appreciate that when you play it the first time, it's entirely possible you just don't get the same kind of horror build up that others might. Making things run at a bit of a brisker pace may make the game not wear out its welcome for some people. And yes, the eat/release does indeed need a larger difference, there are a few occasions where it does matter, but its probably too far and few between. I do appreciate you giving it a go though, it's a strange idea but I'm glad you seem to at the very least get where I'm going with it.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

AnonSpore posted:

I dunno if it was intended but after I ate a fleshcube my boat started sinking into the sea and eventually I disappeared from sight completely, but I kept getting eat/release prompts.

Echoing what the other guy said about it getting tedious quickly. I felt like some of the stuff there was pretty interesting but I really don't feel like sitting through a bunch of wind noises and stuff again to see what the opposite effect of eating/releasing it is. Plus not knowing what the triggers are for things getting scarier (I don't need to KNOW know, but some indication at all would be nice), like even the normal fish turning weird, makes it feel like my actions are inconsequential.


Thanks for the feedback yo! Indeed this is all good stuff to know. Like I said, the thing was never really truly field tested per se so it's good to know which elements people like/add to the atmosphere and which ones are just annoying/confusing etc. It's hard to capture the kind of lonely surreal experience of some of my early childhood nightmares accurately in game-form, so that's basically what I was trying for with some of this stuff.

Speaking of which, anyone here ever play The Dark Eye? That was something truly surreal and horrifying to me as a kid, and I can honestly say nothing has quite given me the jibblies as much as that game did since. Using the Uncanny valley to a game's benefit is something I think horror games too often overlook the value of.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

SolidSnakesBandana posted:

Trying to create an unscripted horror game seems like an impossible task.

Hopefully not. The few attempts at some form of procedural horror haven't exactly worked, but at the same time they were kind of derivative in many ways. I think to do procedural or at least less scripted horror right will take a wildly different approach to just "Slender/Amnesia with randomized room layouts"

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Pochoclo posted:

The problem with all "procedural horror" seen so far is that it's really just one layer of rolling a dice and choosing stuff from a table. While tables are of course a big aspect of procedural generation, they really need to step up the AI game and make otherworldly characters with alien motivations that are at least somewhat believable. Alien: Isolation tried this and failed horribly, but I'm pretty sure it can be done to a reasonable degree. Still, the effort involved in this is so great, that I don't know if it's actually worth it. Whatever they manage, it's not gonna be half as good as some good old, well-written, scripted horror. Emergent gameplay is good as filler but it's never going to be as unsettling as a well-written piece. I mean, do you expect Radiant AI to reproduce the same feeling you got when reading The Willows? True horror is difficult. Jump scares are cheap.

Certainly, it's easier to achieve a cohesive experience just by writing it all out, but I think the main appeal, and the reason people are interested at all in playing/making a "procedural" horror is due to the water cooler effect those games tend to produce. It's neat to be able to come away from a game and have your own story to tell from the experience. That and it takes fuller advantage of the whole interactive element that serves as a unique strength for games as a medium.

I think it's possible to get a good procedural horror game without inflating time and budgets to crazy extremes. For example, the whole AI problem wouldn't be such a big problem if the game was revolved around a horror premise that didn't need monsters stalking you around maze-like environments Dead Space style. One of the most effective horror movies for me has always been Misery, because of the simple setting and premise.

So imagine the horror game version of that, where you are trapped in someone's house and have to keep yourself in one piece in time to either escape yourself while they leave on momentary trips, or find a way to get messages sent out to the world to speed up the time the police are going to discover what happened and come rescue you. This type of setting could lend itself fairly well to some procedural elements, as here the layout of a single house is of the utmost importance. Simply changing the layout could change the experience and keep it tense between play-throughs as you hobble around trying to find the phone, or something you can use as a lockpick later.

Similarly, all of the development time could go into making just ONE unique AI in the form of your kidnapper, whose patrol routes and mannerisms could be changed fairly simply. Even dialog trees can be done in semi-randomized ways given simple Mad-Libs style scripts going on behind the scenes. I think the problem is that everyone is so focused on just trying to recreate the same game experiences we already have, and are just tacking on procedural elements superficially.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!


I've had this game in my backlog for the longest time, and after reading this now I'm fairly tempted to finally bust it out to give it a go! For some reason mentioning it ISN'T a pure horror game actually has sorta sold me on it. Might make the horror bits all the more effective when the rest of the game is mostly setup.

Also, not sure if this is super appropriate or not, BUT y'all gave me some good feedback the last time I popped in to drop a weird little horror game jam project, and while this one isn't exactly horror in the purest sense, it definitely deals with some horrific elements/visuals, as it deals with a child who's afraid of his teeth decaying, and I went full-hog on making the nightmare sequences look like the essence of that fear.

Anyway, it's called "The Missing Minute", it's super short and was made for a jam called the Indie Speed Run which will actually start up public voting the day after Halloween, but I figured I'd post this here before Halloween while everyone's still in the spooky mood. Give it a go or don't - but if you do be sure to tell me whatcha think! We lost two days of sleep over this thing, so I can only hope it's at least worth that. As far as gameplay goes, the best way to describe it is like a tower defense where the towers are portable. And also tooth monsters.




http://deliinteractive.itch.io/the-missing-minute

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Firstborn posted:

I'm looking for games where you play as a monster hunter, preferably a vampire hunter. I know of Castlevania, Legacy of Kain, Blade, Buffy the Vampire, and The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing (even though you don't kill any vampires). Can anyone come up with some that are worth playing?

Nosferatu absolutely. It's one of my favorite games in general, and very explicitly features vampire hunting complete with holy water and crosses as mechanics. Also ghouls if you're into that.

Other good monster/vampire hunting games would be DarkWatch (Van Helsing in the Wild West, basically) and BloodBorne for capturing the perfect flavor for a gothic monster hunting game.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

HaroldofTheRock posted:

I've been playing through Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon on 3DS lately. The controls took me a while to get used to, but what a fun, goofy spookfest. I liked the original Luigi's Mansion on Gamecube but haven't played it in like 10 years, so I forgot all the personality these games have. Luigi is constantly terrified, which is hilarious, and he does a lot of slapstick pratfalls when poo poo goes down. Even then, there are some legit creepy moments. I think this would be a good gateway game for kids or people who aren't necessarily into horror games.

Kid friendly horror in general seems like a great thing we don't get quite enough of. I have a younger sibling who I like to introduce to horror stuff, but there's not a ton out there other than the big names from the 90's like Goosebumps and the like. Sometimes I even prefer some kid-friendly horror over what we get served as adults because it always has to find some way around "death" being the only threat, often resulting in some kind of kid-friendly vision of eternal suffering instead, because for whatever reason that's much more kid friendly.

But seriously, what are some other good kid friendly horror stuff?

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Xenomrph posted:

This looks pretty slick, but I'm curious how much the AI actually learns from and mimics you, or if it's easily-exploitable smoke and mirrors.

From the looks of the trailer it actually looks like they did it fairly simply. I wouldn't say the AI seems to "learn" from you so much as they simply just take the same paths you did and then reverting to basic shooty-kill AI when spotting you. So it's basically the FPS equivalent of the game SNAKE. With that said, even being that simple I can see this being a weirdly tense experience given the basic strategy involves you not repeating yourself.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Ineffiable posted:

After Soma and alien isolation,its hard to be excited for routine.

And we're getting a proper system shock 1 reboot. I mean I love the design of routine but when it was first announced, nothing was similar to it.

Yeah that's kinda the tragic part of the whole thing. The triple A world kinda came and ate their lunch already. Even with the retro 70's vision of the future aesthetic, which is baffling to me that they would be beaten to it. (Though by the franchise that inspired the look to begin with, to be fair)

Still, as a 4-year developer myself I gotta root for them that when they release they'll still be relevant. Isn't it just like 3 guys taking on what essentially looks like a polished triple A style product? Can be hard to blame em sometimes for the wait. Though they really need to get a hold on their quiet developer shtick. At least show off a muddy texture or something once in a while, guys.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

So apparently tinyBuild are now publishing a stealth horror game where you try to sneak into your paranoid neighbor's house:

http://www.helloneighborgame.com/

Seems like a kind of interesting premise - sort of Don't Breathe, the game. The art style is pretty unique too, all things considered. You don't see tons of horror games with a kind of cartoony art style like this. Not sure how much it benefits the mood, but I can't say I can complain too much when most horror games on the market now all look like the same kind of grungy, realistic textures with blood on them poo poo.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Gaz2k21 posted:

The Friday the 13th game is being delayed to incorporate a single player mode estimated release is early 2017 😵

With this, doesn't this mean basically every high profile horror release is NOT coming out this October? At this rate I'm honestly wracking my brain trying to think of a horror title that is being marketed to come out during the horror season. Between this and the way this month is looking with film releases, it looks like it's going to be a very retrospective October.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Just wanted to pop in and say that I bought DISTRAINT on Too Shy Guy's recommendation, and just finished it tonight. While the writing started to falter a bit (particularly some of the dialog, which gets pretty function-before-emotion towards the end) it was a pretty nice little experience. It was like a bite-sized Silent Hill with a little bit of strange humor thrown in, all with a pretty awesome aesthetic and tone. Well worth the time and money. Thanks for recommending that!

On that note, anyone have any other bite-sized horror experiences to recommend? Specifically, if there's any other neat little 2D games out there that do something similar, I'm super down to try some more of these little indie horror titles out. I say 2D mainly because I kinda suck at most games, and taking a dimension out helps my wee gamer brain sort out the occasional puzzle or action sequence a little better. Also I happen to enjoy horror games with unique aesthetics, and with the standard indie horror title being some 3D walking simulator with standard Unity store assets, it seems 2D horror games are more likely to try something a little more out of the box. At least from what I've gathered from titles like Neverending Nightmares and Lone Survivor.

Anyway, Distraint is awesome, so anyone who hasn't already jumped the gun should definitely try it out.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Monoclinic posted:

LIMBO is a great 2D platformer that is fairly short and quite creepy. I think it fits the bill!

Have yet to play it through all the way but this is a solid point here; think this ought to be a good time to finish it! I've also dug out the original Clock Tower which I've never played before, but have heard many good things about. This will be a good month yet!

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

SUPERMAN'S GAL PAL posted:

I'm extremely behind on Steam and game pricing, don't quite know where else to ask: is $14.99 ($17.99 with the soundtrack) a good deal for Darkest Dungeon? I've watched the game streamed, love the art and sound design, and am fond of roguelikes even when permadeath is possible.

That's the price I bought it at originally, and I can certainly say I thought it was pretty worth it. So long as you go in with the expectation that this isn't a roguelike you can pour several hours into at a time. It's honestly very stressful to play, though that's sort of the point in a way. My fiance who hates roguelikes even enjoyed playing it for a session, which to me says a lot about its mechanics' approachability. I've yet to beat it to this day, but it drips with so much good art and atmosphere and is easy enough to pick up for small sessions that I have to come back to it every once in a while to make some more slow progress on my Hamlet. It's good, just pace yourself with it.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Sakurazuka posted:

I really wish the original Siren was easier to play because it has atmosphere like no other game really, but it's such a chore to actually do anything in it. The sequel and remake are good but also not the same.

This raises a kind of interesting point about most horror games that I've been wondering about recently, and that's the question of "do horror games need to be difficult to maintain their effect?" I ask this because I'd really like to see/track down any horror games that are more "casual" for a lack of better terms, something you could use to get a friend who likes horror films into horror games because oddly enough it's poo poo like this that keeps a lot of horror fans from crossing over, and it's what has kept me from actually finishing the majority of horror games I've played. One might even argue that a game that makes you play the same section over and over for not getting it right completely destroys the natural pacing of the horror, yet the threat of death is what keeps me on the edge of my seat for a lot of it. Siren especially, though it's so frustrating to play I just can't get far enough to actually start to enjoy it like I do most horror flicks.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

A. Beaverhausen posted:

It's a real shame even though Until Dawn was a success there isn't even a spiritual sequel in talks. There's so much you can do with the vehicle and so many horror tropes to use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EL3svUfC8Ds

What, you didn't mean a VR rail shooter did you? I swore I heard you say you wanted a rail shooter.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!


A friend gifted this to me recently and it's honestly such a breath of fresh air from the usual horror muck on Steam. It's definitely REALLY simple, but has a pretty kick-rear end atmosphere. Though you are totally right that the car collisions will scare new people off because to this day I still am not sure what the best technique to avoid them is, given how little time you have to react. It's also a little odd to me that cars can come from any side of the road, which seems to imply you're driving the wrong way on a one-way road? Nonetheless, definitely a steal at 3 bucks.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

MockingQuantum posted:

I've got a question that I'm guessing may be a little divisive, but I'm curious to hear the answers: I kind of hate the concept of hide & sneak style horror games, with a fiery passion, but it seems like it's sort of the de-facto way of operating for the majority of new horror games. So what games actually do this well? Or are good in spite of the "run and hide until it goes away" gameplay, if that's the case?

I've been sitting on Alien: Isolation for ages, and quit Amnesia pretty early on back when it came out once I found out you couldn't actually do anything to your pursuers. It seems like I should at least play those two since I have them and they're generally regarded as good games, but what else is definitely worth playing?

Or maybe a better question is, what should I definitely avoid?

I will say that despite the jank, Depths of Fear: Knossos is one of my favorites of this particular sub-genre. It has a unique setting (Minotaur/Greek Mythology monsters in a dark labyrinth), a totally killer 70's synth soundtrack, utilizes some very light roguelike elements to mixed degrees of success (spells are totally useless, but the meta-progression system of buying new starting weapons is pretty satisfying), and there are plenty of killable fodder enemies in between all the sneaky-sneaky to help break things up. Additionally, your character can run like a god drat Olympian so even when you do get caught, recovery is always an option. whereas in games like Outlast I remember it being a huge pain in the rear end to shake them off you once you are spotted. This does break into the tension a little, but the sound design and general atmosphere tend to make up for it in my opinion.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Not sure if this is kosher or not BUT I figured this might be of interest to some of you:

My game dev team and I will be interviewing/chatting with indie horror developer Depressing Drawers (Dead End Road, The Nothing) today at 5pm EST on our Game Development Twitch channel https://m.twitch.tv/deliinteractive/

So come on by if you wanna join in on the discussion! Also if anyone has any good interview questions that would make for an interesting stream I'm all ears!

Incidentally I picked up The Nothing during the sale and played some of it last night, and while it's clunky as hell it has a killer drat nightmare surrealist atmosphere for a 2D side scroller roguelike if you like that sort of thing.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

DeathChicken posted:

I remember liking his Let's Play of Jurassic Park Trespasser

Oh my lord it took me this long to realize he was a goon. Welp! Diligent research, here we are!

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Stream just ended and I'll say Paul is simply a joy to chat with. Very funny honest dude, who is extremely passionate about having artistic integrity in what he makes. And also wrestling. Good stuff. A fine reminder to support the man in his endeavors, I mean good god Dead End Road is a little over a buck at the moment.

Speaking of the sale, why the hell isnt the Goosebumps game on sale for this? Anyone play it who can vouch for it at its regular price? The series was my introduction to horror as a kid so I've been curious to pick it up for nostalgia kicks.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

I wonder if it has less to do with Hello Neighbor chasing the "lore" crowd specifically so much as they wound up chasing the target audience of FNAF - i.e. kids, who are predisposed to wacky weird ghost stories.

Given that, and their clear desire to capitalize on the merchandise whale that comes with a successful kid friendly product might explain some of this stuff like the weak dream ending, the shift of focus to wacky house shenanigans and the apparent lack of any actual consequences in the plot as far as I understand it. It reads exactly like a Goosebumps novel.

Not a good one mind, but I think it's more that they decided to be a kids game than anything else.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Cardiovorax posted:

I would like to see a game based on The Color out of Space someday. You could create all kinds of novel and color-based visual gameplay mechanics for a game like that.

Second this. Though I haven't played it, I do see that Darkest Dungeon has a "Colour of Madness" DLC that plays heavily on farmer/cosmic crystal imagery which if nothing else seems pretty heavily inspired by that particular story.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

So I wound up picking up Friday the 13th and Dead by Daylight during the Steam Sale and tried them both during the weekend, and wow. I gotta say, I have no idea why Dead by Daylight is as popular as it is given how little it does to actually take advantage of its own premise. When I heard about these multiplayer 1vEveryone horror games, I expected something along the lines of well, what Friday the 13th (very successfully) delivers on. You know, recreating a sort of horror movie experience, where survivors are being picked off one by one while trying to escape a horrible killer. Instead, Dead by Daylight is this odd, almost context-free labyrinth of booby traps, generators, and survivors who instead of dying when rammed with a chainsaw are just temporarily downed until they can be meat-hooked. I guess I'm not really understanding what they're going for here.

It makes it all the more a shame that Friday the 13th is the one that's going to be inevitably shut down since the license was pulled out from under them, because it honestly delivers way better on the horror movie experience in my opinion. Dying in Friday the 13th is entertaining in and of itself thanks to the variety of kills, and I usually found myself sticking around afterwards just to watch my fellow survivors' experiences. In Dead By Daylight, even though there's a dozen different killers, I always wind up suffering the exact same meat-hook fate, and spectating is less enjoyable for the same reason. Ultimately, there's exactly one win state and one fail state. Where in Friday the 13th, there's a variety of ways to win or fail.

Bert of the Forest fucked around with this message at 05:13 on Jul 1, 2019

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Horror is a state of mind - Iím gonna stir the pot some more and say that, to 11 year old me, Myst was one of the scariest horror games. Itís just you and the uncanny emptiness of a strange world and its many contrived puzzle doors.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Yeah that's my biggest beef with the horror game subgenre as a whole, is that the vast majority of them feel the need to be frustratingly difficult in an attempt to raise the stakes. I can probably count the number of horror games I actually get to finishing on one hand. I'm looking at you Siren, you are so good but so hard.

EDIT: To be fair I guess that trend has sort of changed in recent years to the opposite end of the spectrum, with a lot of horror being in the walking simulator genre, though that's too much non-gameplay for me as well. A happy balance for me tends to just be one that's tense but forgiving. Resident Evil 2 on easy was like perfect for me. More of that, please.

Bert of the Forest fucked around with this message at 20:29 on Aug 29, 2019

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Too Shy Guy posted:

This game has been around for over five years, and in fact just got remastered this past July, so if you've somehow overlooked it all this time it's still very much worth checking out. And it's just $2!

SPOOKY GAMES 6: Hellseeker

1. Apsulov: End of Gods
2. Conarium
3. TAMASHII
4. Apparition
5. Secrets of the Maw (DLC)
6. Bad Dream: Coma

7. They Breathe



Fantastic review for a fantastic game. Makes me really sad that the needs of the marketplace are pushing so hard against games like this being viable anymore, but I hard-second checking out They Breathe, it's one of my all-time favorites.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

One of the things that makes kids singing/scary clowns for that matter so hokey is they all feel outdated because the source material "innocence" of those things aren't really around anymore. Kids don't sing nursery rhymes anymore, they be out here singing "baby shark" - a proper modern horror piece should make use of THAT poo poo. Give me some creepy kids doing some Yo Gabba Gabba.

EDIT: Similarly, instead of clowns as the defacto "children entertainers gone awry" someone should really make a film/game where a slime reaction youtuber is the monster instead.

Bert of the Forest fucked around with this message at 21:26 on Oct 10, 2019

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Just played about 3 hours of Cold Fear for want of something spooky/winter themed to play for December's Friday the 13th tonight. Wound up quitting thanks to its combat/story eventually wearing me down with their tedium, but I certainly didn't expect to see so much Dead Space DNA in it! I always heard about it as the under-the-radar, less good RE4, but it has way more in common with Dead Space despite coming out several years prior. I got into total Dead Space mindset when I had to start stomping the heads on corpses to prevent them from becoming reanimated by parasites in the midst of combat encounters, so that was a neat surprise. Plus there's a surprising amount of varied ways to kill enemies using the environment, but they rush up to you so quick you hardly ever have a chance to utilize most of them. Don't regret the purchase for the few hours I got from it though, they killed it with that stormy atmosphere if nothing else.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Darthemed posted:

What would you all consider to be some of the more fertile/untapped settings for horror games?

And on the flipside, which ones have been done to death?

For ones that feel (relatively) untapped or that Iíd personally like to see done well:

- Circus
- Theme Park
- The Witch-esque 18th century village
- Deserts/Desert towns

For stuff that feels overdone:

- Haunted houses
- Industrial settings
- spooky woods
- ruined city

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Relin posted:

the infinite respawns in cold fear made me give up on it.

Yeah this is more or less what happened for me as well. The constant combat anytime you needed to backtrack was a pain, made worse by the fact that the laser sight was often concealed by your characters big head.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

I do think horror games are pretty well suited to the "Courage the Cowardly Dog" effect of mixing discordant art styles to create unease, as described. I imagine a 2.5D doomlike or something that just so happens to have the monster as a fully rendered 3D object could be pretty effective. Art direction in general could really play up that sort of thing.

Bert of the Forest fucked around with this message at 00:57 on Aug 19, 2020

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

This might be a weird tangent for this thread, but out of curiosity, do folks here have recommendations for good "spooky, but not scary" games? Like family-friendly "horror" games that I could play to celebrate spooky-season with my scaredy cat family members? Luigi's Mansion is like PERFECT for this specific thing, but I'm curious how many more games are out there up that alley.

Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Thanks for the suggestions y'all!

I'll definitely be checking out some of these. Smile For Me, Ghostbusters, Darkside Detective and Death Road To Canada seem to hem fairly close to what we're looking for! And since it was mentioned, come to think of it Psychonauts may have enough spookiness as well to be counted. Thanks!

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Bert of the Forest
Apr 27, 2013

Shucks folks, I'm speechless. Hawf Hawf Hawf!

Honestly with so many indies chasing the tail of silent hill Iíd live to see more horror games that dig up the goofier fun side of horror. More Evil Dead/Killer Klowns in tone, just a monster fest that feels like a Halloween hayride or something. Resident Evil usually hems closer to that side of things but I donít see it prop up a lot outside of them. I could have some blind spots of course.

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