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Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


I've seen Koreanized ramen with that color here. Miso and gochujang.

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Al Cowens
Aug 11, 2004

by WE B Bourgeois


Al Cowens posted:

I don't think it's ra-yu. I've had ra-yu
I'm bad at writing posts.

The ra-yu I've tried, despite being called "chili oil" was not very spicy at all. This broth is reasonably spicy. It might have ra-yu in it but whatever's giving it that flavor and burn I don't think is the ra-yu. If anyone can figure this out I'd appreciate it because I want that flavor in everything.


Grand Fromage posted:

I've seen Koreanized ramen with that color here. Miso and gochujang.
This might be it. Either this or shichimi togarashi

Al Cowens fucked around with this message at Aug 3, 2014 around 12:20

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Al Cowens posted:

I'm bad at writing posts.

The ra-yu I've tried, despite being called "chili oil" was not very spicy at all. This broth is reasonably spicy. It might have ra-yu in it but whatever's giving it that flavor and burn I don't think is the ra-yu. If anyone can figure this out I'd appreciate it because I want that flavor in everything.

This might be it. Either this or shichimi togarashi

Shichimi isn't that spicy and it also won't give the whole bowl that bright red-orange color.

Annath
Jan 11, 2009



Clever Betty

Hey, I was going to make some Sukiyaki for dinner tonight, and I was going to use this recipe:
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Beef-Sukiyaki/

It calls for "mirin" but doesnt specifiy which kind. Wegmans has "Aji-Mirin" and "Kotteri Mirin" and I was wondering which type I should be using?

mich
Feb 28, 2003
I may be racist but I'm the good kind of racist! You better put down those chopsticks, you HITLER!


If it is the chili oil, they probably make their own, making it spicier due to the specific peppers they use.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Annath posted:

Hey, I was going to make some Sukiyaki for dinner tonight, and I was going to use this recipe:
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Beef-Sukiyaki/

It calls for "mirin" but doesnt specifiy which kind. Wegmans has "Aji-Mirin" and "Kotteri Mirin" and I was wondering which type I should be using?

Aji Mirin & Kotteri Mirin are for all intents & purposes interchangeable in this context. Out of artificially sweetened mirin I prefer Aji-mirin. The only mirin that is really that different is "hon-mirin" which is naturally brewed and doesn't have corn syrup/sugar added. At least where I live, it's near impossible to find hon-mirin, hence, I use Aji Mirin.

http://justhungry.com/classic-sukiy...se-beef-hot-pot < Makiko Itoh's recipe is really close to the way I make it. The warishita process is in my opinion essential. The other thing and she notes it too, you want super thinly sliced beef with a decent amount of fat (otherwise it is too tough) and see if your grocer's butcher dept. can get you a chunk of beef fat to start the pot with. It really adds great flavor to the dish doing it that way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TcUMeeBjD4
Cooking with Dog has a nice tutorial too of Kansai-style, how I make it. We only cook some of the meat first though, to get the flavor started.

I absolutely love sukiyaki but don't eat it a lot (actually the last time I had it was probably Mother's day 2011) because of the sugar content and beef costs. I like to make tori no mizutaki (Chicken hot-pot) in the winter because it is pretty healthy and tasty and cheaper.

Al Cowens
Aug 11, 2004

by WE B Bourgeois


What's a good way of preparing ramen that's a nice compromise between doing it the real way by simmering pig bones for several hours and putting a $0.30 bag of ramen + spice packet in a microwave for 5 minutes? Looking for some middle ground here. Just make miso as described on the first page of this thread but add some noodles and precooked pork? and an egg?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Al Cowens posted:

What's a good way of preparing ramen that's a nice compromise between doing it the real way by simmering pig bones for several hours and putting a $0.30 bag of ramen + spice packet in a microwave for 5 minutes? Looking for some middle ground here. Just make miso as described on the first page of this thread but add some noodles and precooked pork? and an egg?

Since miso soup and ramen broth are really different, I would highly recommend you look for these kits if you have a big Asian grocery near you. The H-Mart near me carries them and they're really good: Ramen Kits from Sun Ramen.
They're a little more expensive than instant ramen but a whole lot better, the noodles are fresh and tasty, and the broths are solid.
Also they're super easy to make.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



I've taken to making onigiri once a week for my work lunch and got a little tired of my usual salmon/mayo/soy sauce/sesame filling, so I bought some umeboshi today. Do I just pit one of those and pop it in the middle or is there a preparation method?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


My Lovely Horse posted:

I've taken to making onigiri once a week for my work lunch and got a little tired of my usual salmon/mayo/soy sauce/sesame filling, so I bought some umeboshi today. Do I just pit one of those and pop it in the middle or is there a preparation method?

Yep, it is exactly that simple. I like the ones with shiso added for onigiri.

You can alternately put other pickles (like takana/pickled mustard greens are a good one) or you can put various stewed meat, chashu, tuna & mayonnaise, stewed konbu, ground stewed chicken, etc etc.

electricmonk500
May 6, 2007


My Lovely Horse posted:

I've taken to making onigiri once a week for my work lunch and got a little tired of my usual salmon/mayo/soy sauce/sesame filling, so I bought some umeboshi today. Do I just pit one of those and pop it in the middle or is there a preparation method?

It's weird to me that I never considered just putting a chunk of umeboshi in onigiri (because it seems like there's no problem there), but I always like to slice it into a paste first (surprisingly easy/fast) and then use it.

gamingCaffeinator
Sep 6, 2010

I shall sing you the song of my people.


electricmonk500 posted:

It's weird to me that I never considered just putting a chunk of umeboshi in onigiri (because it seems like there's no problem there), but I always like to slice it into a paste first (surprisingly easy/fast) and then use it.

I know that at Yoko's they just stick a big chunk in there, which is my favorite way to eat them it's a little bomb of saltysweetsavory in the middle of perfectly sticky rice.

sexy fucking muskrat
Aug 22, 2010

by exmarx


Does anyone have a good recipe for yakisoba sauce? Or am I just better off buying it bottled from the store?

DJ Dizzy
Feb 11, 2009

Real men don't use bolters.

Can someone recommend a good rice cooker? Budget would be about 50GBP or roughly 100USD.

Al Cowens
Aug 11, 2004

by WE B Bourgeois


hallo spacedog posted:

Since miso soup and ramen broth are really different, I would highly recommend you look for these kits if you have a big Asian grocery near you. The H-Mart near me carries them and they're really good: Ramen Kits from Sun Ramen.
They're a little more expensive than instant ramen but a whole lot better, the noodles are fresh and tasty, and the broths are solid.
Also they're super easy to make.
This looks loving amazing. Thanks.

DJ Dizzy posted:

Can someone recommend a good rice cooker? Budget would be about 50GBP or roughly 100USD.
A little over your stated budget but I got a zojirushi thing about on-par with this in 2006 which has never let me down since for about $120USD

Soricidus
Oct 20, 2010
freedom-hating statist shill

Pillbug

Al Cowens posted:

A little over your stated budget but I got a zojirushi thing about on-par with this in 2006 which has never let me down since for about $120USD
Zojirushis are great, but good luck finding one in the UK for under GBP150.

You can't just import a cheaper US or JP model because those don't work on 240v power. (Most of the cheap-looking amazon.co.uk results are imports that probably fall into this trap.)

DJ Dizzy
Feb 11, 2009

Real men don't use bolters.

Soricidus posted:

Zojirushis are great, but good luck finding one in the UK for under GBP150.

You can't just import a cheaper US or JP model because those don't work on 240v power. (Most of the cheap-looking amazon.co.uk results are imports that probably fall into this trap.)

Yeop. Pretty much my problem. Anyone tried this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...&pf_rd_i=468294

Sex Hobbit
Jul 24, 2007

because we are cat


hallo spacedog posted:

Since miso soup and ramen broth are really different, I would highly recommend you look for these kits if you have a big Asian grocery near you. The H-Mart near me carries them and they're really good: Ramen Kits from Sun Ramen.
They're a little more expensive than instant ramen but a whole lot better, the noodles are fresh and tasty, and the broths are solid.
Also they're super easy to make.

I saw this and immediately dropped everything and ran to H-Mart. I'm chowing into a miso pack right now and it is indeed the bee's knees.

inferis
Dec 30, 2003



DJ Dizzy posted:

Can someone recommend a good rice cooker? Budget would be about 50GBP or roughly 100USD.

if your budget is really tight, a $10 rice cooker will still make perfect rice if you get your ratios right, but it will probably be harder to clean and won't have features like timers or auto shutoff.

gamingCaffeinator
Sep 6, 2010

I shall sing you the song of my people.


inferis posted:

if your budget is really tight, a $10 rice cooker will still make perfect rice if you get your ratios right, but it will probably be harder to clean and won't have features like timers or auto shutoff.

This is truth. I have an Imusa rice cooker that I got for $12 (clearance plus coupon) and it makes perfect rice. It even has auto shut off!

DJ Dizzy
Feb 11, 2009

Real men don't use bolters.

gamingCaffeinator posted:

This is truth. I have an Imusa rice cooker that I got for $12 (clearance plus coupon) and it makes perfect rice. It even has auto shut off!

Coupons is a no-go here, seeing as they are illegal.

gamingCaffeinator
Sep 6, 2010

I shall sing you the song of my people.


DJ Dizzy posted:

Coupons is a no-go here, seeing as they are illegal.

It was like $20 USD before discounts (10GBP?), and it's great. I was just trying to make the point that you don't need anything really fancy if you want to cook rice.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


I've actually had pretty good luck with some of the stuff off of https://en.cookpad.com/

Here's a chin jao rosu recipe I tried https://en.cookpad.com/recipe/525217



and a really good kakuni recipe https://en.cookpad.com/recipe/1030026

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


That kakuni looks really good.
Sometimes when I don't have the 4 hours to make big chunks, I use thin sliced bellies instead and do an hour and a half, which works pretty decently well too.

cyberia
Jun 24, 2011

Do not call me that!
Snuffles was my slave name.
You shall now call me Snowball; because my fur is pretty and white.

DJ Dizzy posted:

Can someone recommend a good rice cooker? Budget would be about 50GBP or roughly 100USD.

Go to your local chinatown or asian ethnic enclave equivalent and find a shop selling cookware. Buy the best looking rice cooker that fits your budget.

I bought my rice cooker around 5 years ago from a chinese grocery store and it's still going strong. Zojirushi cookers might be nice for all the extra functionality they have but a plain rice cooker is still going to make great rice.

ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

hallo spacedog posted:

Yep, it is exactly that simple. I like the ones with shiso added for onigiri.

You can alternately put other pickles (like takana/pickled mustard greens are a good one) or you can put various stewed meat, chashu, tuna & mayonnaise, stewed konbu, ground stewed chicken, etc etc.

Matsutake and carrots cooked with some dashi broth is really great in onigiri.

Al Loo Min Um
Oct 21, 2008

Say. It. With. Me.


Stringent posted:

I've actually had pretty good luck with some of the stuff off of https://en.cookpad.com/

I heard about that recently. They've been translating some of the most popular recipes which is useful, the Japanese version won't let you filter by popularity or rating unless you pay for a premium account.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Al Loo Min Um posted:

I heard about that recently. They've been translating some of the most popular recipes which is useful, the Japanese version won't let you filter by popularity or rating unless you pay for a premium account.

Yeah well,

Worlds Smuggest
Mar 13, 2010


Actually something that I frequently use is a Microwave rice cooker, it's difficult sometimes to gauge just how much water you should add but a little salt and you get a fairly large bucket full of rice that doesn't have water problems and turns out pretty good every time.

As well as the Rapid Ramen maker to make the noodles very quickly of any kind except fried, which you can do stuff quickly with by rapid cooking the noodles then converting them down into a pan for different treatment.

The process of this involves just boiling the noodles to an easy consistency rather than brick form, adding a little oil and spices of your choice to fry pan along with meat, then once ramen is ready add to that stir until brown or fried to your liking(along with meat) and eat.

This lets you make a fairly good meal fast while still using cheap staple items for the lazy man in us all.

Alternatively, if you can get your hands on yaki-soba noodles or feel like making them yourself, you can have more traditional stir fry noodles.

The most difficult issue with a lot of asian cooking is there is not usually a large meat presence save for a few regional styles or specialty dishes that are not primarily fish. When you are a almost pure carnivore, this makes things a lot more challenging when trying new foods and styles.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


The standardest of standard Japanese home cooked meals, but still so, so good.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

So tell me how you grill the fish.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


This is more or less the range that comes standard in 90% of japanese homes. The drawer in the middle is a fish oven.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


Stringent posted:

This is more or less the range that comes standard in 90% of japanese homes. The drawer in the middle is a fish oven.



this was fun to discover when I was living there and offered to make thanksgiving dinner for my friends at their place

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

So you stick the fish under the broiler, basically.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Mr. Wiggles posted:

So you stick the fish under the broiler, basically.

With a water pan underneath, yep.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



What is that? A sardine?

kinmik
Jul 17, 2011

Dog, what are you doing? Get away from there.
You don't even have thumbs.


Looks like a saury, or sanma. They're an oily fish, I think?

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



I'm planning to grill some mackerel this weekend. How does one season a grilled fish?

icehewk
Jul 7, 2003

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

Salt, typically.

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mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004


Bubbacub posted:

I'm planning to grill some mackerel this weekend. How does one season a grilled fish?

not salt, you brine the fish.

make an oceany puckery brine, and brine your thawed filets for ~15 minutes, or more like 30-45 for a whole mackerel. pat thoroughly dry. rub with oil, grill. sprinkle with sea salt on the grill, if you want - but that's just a finishing touch. standard japanese procedure for broiled salted fish is always brining afaik based on my reading. removes extra fishiness/blood as well as seasoning - makes sense to me.

Mr. Wiggles posted:

So you stick the fish under the broiler, basically.

yes. standard in smaller japanese kitchens (commercial or otherwise) is a toaster oven set on broil. just pop a fish on some aluminum foil prepared re: above under the broiler for a few minutes, flip, and you've completed your mission.

alternately a small habachi grill with lumpwood charcoal - http://markdale.hubpages.com/hub/Hibachi-Grills - depending on your level of cookmancy tryhardness.

mindphlux fucked around with this message at Aug 23, 2014 around 07:03

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