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Piggy Smalls
Jun 21, 2015

Always flippin' always floppin'

I went to an Asian market and bought some glass noodles. Not sure if itís Japanese but any suggestions on a recipe if it is? I think itís sweet potato glass noodles.

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Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Japan is merely a rogue colony of Greater Korea so make japchae. https://www.maangchi.com/recipe/japchae

Piggy Smalls
Jun 21, 2015

Always flippin' always floppin'

Grand Fromage posted:

Japan is merely a rogue colony of Greater Korea so make japchae. https://www.maangchi.com/recipe/japchae

Thank you!!

Doc Walrus
Jan 2, 2014



Alright folks I'm making Pork Udon soup for dinner tonight and I have two questions:

1. Do I cook the noodles in the soup broth or separately?

2. Should I add Miso to the broth, or cover the pork with it? Or both?


Also I've been making Extremely Low Effort Miso soup in my thermos at work. Spoonful of Miso paste, spoonful of soup base, add hot water from the coffee machine, and it's done!

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


Doc Walrus posted:

Alright folks I'm making Pork Udon soup for dinner tonight and I have two questions:

1. Do I cook the noodles in the soup broth or separately?

2. Should I add Miso to the broth, or cover the pork with it? Or both?


Also I've been making Extremely Low Effort Miso soup in my thermos at work. Spoonful of Miso paste, spoonful of soup base, add hot water from the coffee machine, and it's done!

1) Separately

2) Up to you, there are some recipes that do involve miso in the udon broth.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


manny kaltz posted:

Hello thread, I'm thinking of making miso soup for my work lunches next week. Is this soup a dish that can be reheated once it is made, or should I be looking to add the miso to the dashi & tofu etc. after the latter have been reheated?
Add the miso. Miso soup does not store well, at all.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Babylon Astronaut posted:

Add the miso. Miso soup does not store well, at all.

This, and also keep in mind that tofu spoils easily. Just be careful with it.

manny kaltz
Oct 16, 2011

What?...


Babylon Astronaut posted:

Add the miso. Miso soup does not store well, at all.

Thank you (and hallo spacedog). I also have a follow-up question:
I am making the dashi for this miso soup with konbu and katsuobisho. However, the store I went to only had powdered(/concentrated?) versions of both.

I'm mindful of not making the dashi too salty, so want to be cautious about how much of the packets to use.

Does anyone have any experience with using Shimaya brand powdered konbu? (Admittedly, there are instructions on the back of the pack but they are in Japanese, and I cannot read Japanese)

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


I use powdered konbudashi and regular dashi, not sure about those specific brands but in my experience they don't usually have a detectable amount of salt in them.

I tend to just eyeball the amount I use, honestly.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


manny kaltz posted:

(Admittedly, there are instructions on the back of the pack but they are in Japanese, and I cannot read Japanese)

A few of us can, post a picture.

manny kaltz
Oct 16, 2011

What?...


hallo spacedog posted:

I use powdered konbudashi and regular dashi, not sure about those specific brands but in my experience they don't usually have a detectable amount of salt in them.

I tend to just eyeball the amount I use, honestly.

Thanks for the advice about the saltiness. I guess I was also curious about how much of each pack I should be using if I'm making a week's (ie. 5 days) worth of soup. The katsuoboshi packaging suggests 1 satchet equals 8-10 servings of miso soup, but I can't find the same information on the konbu packaging.

For what it's worth, the packaging can be found here: https://imgur.com/a/ICRzs

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


So for the konbudashi, 1/4 of a stick per every 600ml water for soup.

Cephas
May 11, 2009

Witnessing more than I can compute


I don't know if this is super obvious to people other than me, but you can use canned salmon instead of fresh salmon for ochazuke and it's pretty good. I drained the can, added the salmon to a nonstick skillet with a tiny amount of sesame oil, and let it toast until the texture was dry and toasted, and it was actually a pretty good topping to a bowl of ochazuke.

I'm poor so this is a nice discovery for me, because ochazuke's probably one of my favorite breakfasts. Double nice because you can buy canned Alaskan salmon for cheap, and it's like the only type of responsibly sourced salmon in the US that I know of.

manny kaltz
Oct 16, 2011

What?...


hallo spacedog posted:

So for the konbudashi, 1/4 of a stick per every 600ml water for soup.

Awesome, thank you very much.

big black turnout
Jan 13, 2009




Lipstick Apathy

Taking my first shot at making broth for tonkotsu ramen today. Wish me luck

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


big black turnout posted:

Taking my first shot at making broth for tonkotsu ramen today. Wish me luck

Good luck. Take lots of pictures. And post there here.

Tar_Squid
Feb 13, 2012


A little late but here's a method to have ready to go miso soup at work without sacrificing quality-

http://www.justbento.com/handbook/j...-miso-soup-ball

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Just prepping for a late hanami picnic. My partner and I are bringing a camp stove and cooking okonomiyaki. I'm also bringing a thermos full of sake, and another full of homemade amazaki (we have an artisinal sake maker in town so there's a source for sakekasu). The weather is beautiful so I'm bringing them chilled. Should be lots of fun!

Right, off to mix up a few large mason jars worth of okonomiyaki batter...

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Where the hell do you live that there's still cherries in bloom?

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Stringent posted:

Where the hell do you live that there's still cherries in bloom?

Vancouver. And they're a very late blooming variety.

There's literally a website with a crowd sourced map of where all the cherry blossoms in the city are, with a feature to search by date.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Ah ok.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


Gonna start bringing a bento to work again, but I never actually developed a good repertoire of dishes to include. Iím used to making big dishes that I can do in advance like stews, curries, pulled pork, etc., but in my experience that doesnít work too well with a typical 2-tier box. I donít wanna stick to strictly Japanese dishes either, just anything that tastes good cold/room temp and I can make batches of.

Stuff that comes to mind includes:

- Potato salad
- Salad
- Pickles
- Tuna-mayo onigiri

...and I donít really have any other ideas. Whatís a good set of small bits of food that can be made in advance, keeps well, and can be made with ingredients commonly found in American supermarkets?

Iím also probably going to avoid rice or at least reducing the amount I eat, so thereís that concern as well.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Pollyanna posted:


...and I don’t really have any other ideas. What’s a good set of small bits of food that can be made in advance, keeps well, and can be made with ingredients commonly found in American supermarkets?

I’m also probably going to avoid rice or at least reducing the amount I eat, so there’s that concern as well.

Chilli. Pasta sauces. Fried foods. Potstickers. Quesadillas. All can be batch made and reheated in a microwave or toaster oven. You can fry up a couple of chicken thighs, freeze, and pull them out individually to have with potato salad and Mac n cheese for southern US bento.

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Pollyanna posted:

Gonna start bringing a bento to work again, but I never actually developed a good repertoire of dishes to include. Iím used to making big dishes that I can do in advance like stews, curries, pulled pork, etc., but in my experience that doesnít work too well with a typical 2-tier box. I donít wanna stick to strictly Japanese dishes either, just anything that tastes good cold/room temp and I can make batches of.

Stuff that comes to mind includes:

- Potato salad
- Salad
- Pickles
- Tuna-mayo onigiri

...and I donít really have any other ideas. Whatís a good set of small bits of food that can be made in advance, keeps well, and can be made with ingredients commonly found in American supermarkets?

Iím also probably going to avoid rice or at least reducing the amount I eat, so thereís that concern as well.


I usually take a tiny bento-ish box to work (and two cheese sandwiched), and fill the box with a sliced apple (I slice it before work and it's still fine when it's time for lunch), some cherry tomatoes, some almonds and a medjool date.

Instead of rice, you could use couscous with chickpeas (make a salad out of those, with orange zest, scallions, raisins, sweet pepper, onions, whatever you like :-) )

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


Suspect Bucket posted:

Chilli. Pasta sauces. Fried foods. Potstickers. Quesadillas. All can be batch made and reheated in a microwave or toaster oven. You can fry up a couple of chicken thighs, freeze, and pull them out individually to have with potato salad and Mac n cheese for southern US bento.

Potstickers and chicken thighs work, but my experience with sloppy stuff like chili and pasta sauce in bento is that it doesnít...make a whole lot of sense? Iíd expect that to be in jars or thermoses instead of a bento, which I associate more with drier foods.

paraquat posted:

I usually take a tiny bento-ish box to work (and two cheese sandwiched), and fill the box with a sliced apple (I slice it before work and it's still fine when it's time for lunch), some cherry tomatoes, some almonds and a medjool date.

Instead of rice, you could use couscous with chickpeas (make a salad out of those, with orange zest, scallions, raisins, sweet pepper, onions, whatever you like :-) )

Salad definitely works, sandwiches Iíd wonder why not just bring a plastic baggie. Snacks sound good tho. Hrmmmm...

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


big black turnout posted:

Taking my first shot at making broth for tonkotsu ramen today. Wish me luck
So when my chef gets interviewed or whatnot, they always ask the joke question of "what's the worst" and he always cops to getting the firedepartment called because he slept in and burned the tonk. loving hilarious, they fire axed both us and the neighbor's doors because they didn't know where the smoke was coming from. I guess the advice in this is that you really should do the full 30 hours. On the odd chance you have a refractometer, you should be hitting 14-16 easy, and it is not liquid at room temp. it's jello.

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Pollyanna posted:

Potstickers and chicken thighs work, but my experience with sloppy stuff like chili and pasta sauce in bento is that it doesnít...make a whole lot of sense? Iíd expect that to be in jars or thermoses instead of a bento, which I associate more with drier foods.


Salad definitely works, sandwiches Iíd wonder why not just bring a plastic baggie. Snacks sound good tho. Hrmmmm...

Ah...I do bring sandwiches in a plastic baggie...but for the snacks I use this tiny box: https://www.bol.com/nl/p/sistema-to...00000038617159/

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Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


Snacks might not be a bad idea. Iím thinking ez finger foods n poo poo.

- mozzarella+marinated mushroom kebabs
- roasted cocktail weenies
- tiny meatballs in sauce
- bologna/salami/pepperoni and cheese wheels
- random-rear end tamagoyaki
- onigiri filled with tunamayo or leftover curry meat
- deviled eggs, natch
- those ďmuffin omeletteĒ things
- grapes
- sliced apples
- meatloaf slices? hrm

Maybe Iíll pick up some nori.

If I can even put this stuff in the box and pull the box out in the morning that could work too :o is there a reason I wouldnít want to do that?

Pollyanna fucked around with this message at May 25, 2018 around 21:06

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