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mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by FactsAreUseless


I've read a million (7 or 8) japanese cookbooks, this one is amazing. just spend the 14 dollars if you're interested in the topic. best 14 dollars you'll spend http://www.amazon.com/The-Japanese-...l/dp/1558321772

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Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


mindphlux posted:

not salt, you brine the fish.

make an oceany puckery brine, and brine your thawed filets for ~15 minutes, or more like 30-45 for a whole mackerel. pat thoroughly dry. rub with oil, grill. sprinkle with sea salt on the grill, if you want - but that's just a finishing touch. standard japanese procedure for broiled salted fish is always brining afaik based on my reading. removes extra fishiness/blood as well as seasoning - makes sense to me.


yes. standard in smaller japanese kitchens (commercial or otherwise) is a toaster oven set on broil. just pop a fish on some aluminum foil prepared re: above under the broiler for a few minutes, flip, and you've completed your mission.

alternately a small habachi grill with lumpwood charcoal - http://markdale.hubpages.com/hub/Hibachi-Grills - depending on your level of cookmancy tryhardness.

Interesting, I've never heard of brining sanma, we always just sprinkle salt. Some stuff comes from the store brined but it's always cut fish. I'll give it a shot next time.

Plus_Infinity
Apr 12, 2011



mindphlux posted:

I've read a million (7 or 8) japanese cookbooks, this one is amazing. just spend the 14 dollars if you're interested in the topic. best 14 dollars you'll spend http://www.amazon.com/The-Japanese-...l/dp/1558321772

Good to know this is good! I just picked it up from a used bookshop.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



mindphlux posted:

make an oceany puckery brine, and brine your thawed filets for ~15 minutes, or more like 30-45 for a whole mackerel. pat thoroughly dry. rub with oil, grill. sprinkle with sea salt on the grill, if you want - but that's just a finishing touch. standard japanese procedure for broiled salted fish is always brining afaik based on my reading. removes extra fishiness/blood as well as seasoning - makes sense to me.

Yup, this was a good way to do it. Aside from not oiling the grill so they stuck like crazy and got kind of charred on the outside, the brining turned out well. The oily mackerel flesh was really forgiving, so they were still delicious on the inside.

Al Cowens
Aug 11, 2004

by WE B Bourgeois


I am fond of this rice spergtumentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KbRRHRbprU#t=926s

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by FactsAreUseless





that is 0% rice spergtumentary and 100% gross rice cooker advertisement.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Had a bit of an adventure tonight. Last night I went to a combination Okinawan/Indian restaurant, which is weird enough on it's own, but for some reason they came out at the end with a bunch of sazae and asked if we wanted them.

Of course I said yes, but I'd never cooked them before so here we go...

Here they are, two were in their shells, one was out:


Here's what the meat looks like:


And the guts (the internet says some people eat them, I tossed them):


So apparently the way you cook these things is, you clean out the shell then fill it with nihonshu, put the meat back in the shell and boil it over an open flame:


And here's one of them cooked:


I left off one or two pics so here's the album if you're interested http://imgur.com/a/hQjNp

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



What did it taste like?

Worlds Smuggest
Mar 13, 2010


Bubbacub posted:

What did it taste like?

Indeeed a very strange shellfish how was it?

Futaba Anzu
May 5, 2011

GROSS BOY

It looks like it'd taste like a giant snail. Which are delicious

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Sazae is delicious. I've had it cooked with soy sauce and butter before and it's great. Awabi another shellfish is delicious that way too.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


hallo spacedog posted:

Sazae is delicious. I've had it cooked with soy sauce and butter before and it's great. Awabi another shellfish is delicious that way too.

Yeah I cooked down the nihonshu from the shells with soy and butter for a sauce. Was nice tasted like a very subtle mushroom that had been brined. Texture was like very good octopus. I enjoyed it.

Obeast
Aug 26, 2006
_~ ANIME BABE LOVER 2000 ~_

I've been curious about Japanese cooking and snack foods for some time now, but (AFAIK since I haven't done a lot of looking or asking around) there aren't any real good Japanese/Asian markets in my immediate area and all the grocery stores that have Asian food aisles don't have much to begin with outside of the usual rice noodles, soy sauce, panko, and Pocky. Outside of third-party sellers on Amazon who seem to charge $5 for shipping (which probably isn't bad assuming you buy a lot from one seller), are there any good sites to buy Japanese food and ingredients from?

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Obeast posted:

I've been curious about Japanese cooking and snack foods for some time now, but (AFAIK since I haven't done a lot of looking or asking around) there aren't any real good Japanese/Asian markets in my immediate area and all the grocery stores that have Asian food aisles don't have much to begin with outside of the usual rice noodles, soy sauce, panko, and Pocky. Outside of third-party sellers on Amazon who seem to charge $5 for shipping (which probably isn't bad assuming you buy a lot from one seller), are there any good sites to buy Japanese food and ingredients from?

Where are you located?

Obeast
Aug 26, 2006
_~ ANIME BABE LOVER 2000 ~_

bringmyfishback posted:

Where are you located?
In a small town in California's Central Valley (aka the agricultural area of the state). I actually live a few hours from the Bay Area, which I know has some pretty good Asian markets, but I don't want to use up gas to go there just to go shopping for Japanese food stuff. I do go to Salinas every week or so for family stuff, but the Asian markets there I found on Yelp are too far off my usual path, and/or close at 5 PM, which is about the time I usually start headed home. But, if any goons know of any good places in that area, I'll take recommendations.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Obeast posted:

In a small town in California's Central Valley (aka the agricultural area of the state). I actually live a few hours from the Bay Area, which I know has some pretty good Asian markets, but I don't want to use up gas to go there just to go shopping for Japanese food stuff. I do go to Salinas every week or so for family stuff, but the Asian markets there I found on Yelp are too far off my usual path, and/or close at 5 PM, which is about the time I usually start headed home. But, if any goons know of any good places in that area, I'll take recommendations.

Hunh. This article is a bit dated, but maybe you can find somthing on here: http://justhungry.com/handbook/just...nited-states/ca

Rockzilla
Feb 19, 2007

Squish!

mindphlux posted:

I've read a million (7 or 8) japanese cookbooks, this one is amazing. just spend the 14 dollars if you're interested in the topic. best 14 dollars you'll spend http://www.amazon.com/The-Japanese-...l/dp/1558321772

Yep, took this out of the library on a whim a few weeks ago and ordered it from amazon a couple of days later. There's tons of information about basic ingredients and preparations and hundreds of recipes. Pretty sure that this is The One True Japanese Cookbook.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Rockzilla posted:

Yep, took this out of the library on a whim a few weeks ago and ordered it from amazon a couple of days later. There's tons of information about basic ingredients and preparations and hundreds of recipes. Pretty sure that this is The One True Japanese Cookbook.

It's a decent starter book as far as English titles go. It's the first Japanese recipe book I owned (someone gave me a copy in 2001 or so) and I have made quite a few of the dishes. The front description is pretty good.
A lot of the recipes in there are heavily adapted or changed for a western kitchen, which isn't a bad thing necessarily. And a lot of them are the author's recipes that just use Japanese ingredients or techniques. It is a crowdpleasing book, I will give her that.

I like Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art (http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Cook.../dp/1568363885/) for English language cookbooks, personally.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by FactsAreUseless


hallo spacedog posted:

It's a decent starter book as far as English titles go. It's the first Japanese recipe book I owned (someone gave me a copy in 2001 or so) and I have made quite a few of the dishes. The front description is pretty good.
A lot of the recipes in there are heavily adapted or changed for a western kitchen, which isn't a bad thing necessarily. And a lot of them are the author's recipes that just use Japanese ingredients or techniques. It is a crowdpleasing book, I will give her that.

I like Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art (http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Cook.../dp/1568363885/) for English language cookbooks, personally.

awesome, thanks for the recommendation. glad to hear from someone else who shares my enthusiasm for the One True Japanese Cookbook. I'll probably pick this up soon to give it a go.

ladyweapon
Nov 6, 2010

It reads all over his face,
like he's an Italian.


Obeast posted:

In a small town in California's Central Valley (aka the agricultural area of the state). I actually live a few hours from the Bay Area
Depending on how far you are from Modesto, this asian market is legit (as is the pho place in the same parking lot).

UnhealthyJoe
Aug 9, 2012


Not really sure where to ask this or post but i figured this may be a good spot.

Ever since I moved from Tokyo back to the states, I have zero luck finding good soy sauce. Everything here just tastes like pure salt. I go to some of the asian/korean markets to try and buy some but I'll be damned if I can find anything good. I ask the people that work there but either they ignore me or just point to what is on sale.

Suggestions?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


I really like yamasa brand, and I specifically like the way usukuchi tastes way better than the regular ones.

YMMV but when I worked at a decent sushi joint the owner used yamasa.

5MinuteButtermilk
Mar 4, 2014


So what do you nice people think about Japanese-style curry? I haven't seen many posts on it, but it's something I make a lot, especially in winter. I use Yuko Ota's recipe, and I've always found it to be very good.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



5MinuteButtermilk posted:

So what do you nice people think about Japanese-style curry? I haven't seen many posts on it, but it's something I make a lot, especially in winter. I use Yuko Ota's recipe, and I've always found it to be very good.

I've pretty much existed on it for the last month or so because I've been so busy. I was going to write up an effort recipe thread on it when I got some time. I make mine from scratch though because some of the roux bricks have pnut butter and I'm allergic.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

I like the curry a lot (and really love curry katsu but have never got around to making it at home). We just had it last week, even.

EVG
Dec 17, 2005

If I Saw It, Here's How It Happened.


5MinuteButtermilk posted:

So what do you nice people think about Japanese-style curry? I haven't seen many posts on it, but it's something I make a lot, especially in winter. I use Yuko Ota's recipe, and I've always found it to be very good.

Just checking to see if this is legit or a troll. Because it sounds kinda delicious, and kinda trashy at the same time.

Stottie Kyek
Apr 26, 2008

fuckin egg in a bun

It's been floating around the Internet a while but the recipes from Cooking with Dog are actually really good - I tried the mochi and okonomiyaki recipes and they turned out nice. And the show's hosted by a big grey poodle.

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


EVG posted:

Just checking to see if this is legit or a troll. Because it sounds kinda delicious, and kinda trashy at the same time.

I love Japanese style curry. It's absolutely a guilty pleasure, but it's ultimate comfort food for me.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

EVG posted:

Just checking to see if this is legit or a troll. Because it sounds kinda delicious, and kinda trashy at the same time.

The instant roux blocks are *the* taste of navy curry. Sure, it's not like a super traditional 200 year old recipe or anything, but it IS traditional while still sort of trashy. Kind of how Heinz Beans are *the* beans you want with a full English breakfast.

Fooley
Apr 25, 2006

Blue moon of Kentucky keep on shinin'...

One thing I've found is curry bricks make a LOT of roux. Like, triple what the box asks for (except the water) and you'll be set for a couple days.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Fooley posted:

One thing I've found is curry bricks make a LOT of roux. Like, triple what the box asks for (except the water) and you'll be set for a couple days.

really? It's way thin if you put more water than it asks for. It's supposed to be hilariously goopy and thick.

Fooley
Apr 25, 2006

Blue moon of Kentucky keep on shinin'...

GrAviTy84 posted:

really? It's way thin if you put more water than it asks for. It's supposed to be hilariously goopy and thick.

Except the water. I usually drain off any liquids and use that towards however much it calls for, but add in a ton more ingredients because I eat it for a couple days after.

EVG
Dec 17, 2005

If I Saw It, Here's How It Happened.


Mr. Wiggles posted:

The instant roux blocks are *the* taste of navy curry. Sure, it's not like a super traditional 200 year old recipe or anything, but it IS traditional while still sort of trashy. Kind of how Heinz Beans are *the* beans you want with a full English breakfast.

I can see that. I have made countless Thai curries using the little cans of green or red curry paste. drat those are good.

Obeast
Aug 26, 2006
_~ ANIME BABE LOVER 2000 ~_

ladyweapon posted:

Depending on how far you are from Modesto, this asian market is legit (as is the pho place in the same parking lot).

bringmyfishback posted:

Hunh. This article is a bit dated, but maybe you can find somthing on here: http://justhungry.com/handbook/just...nited-states/ca
Thanks! I'll probably check out the place in Modesto since that's the closest that I've seen. A couple people in the comments section on bringmyfishback's link mentioned Stockton and Modesto, but those are a little farther off than I'd like (although everything feels far around here since the towns and cities are pretty spread out). Still, it's good to have an idea of where these stores are located so I can check them out whenever I'm in the area.

Stottie Kyek posted:

It's been floating around the Internet a while but the recipes from Cooking with Dog are actually really good - I tried the mochi and okonomiyaki recipes and they turned out nice. And the show's hosted by a big grey poodle.
I discovered Cooking With Dog a few days ago and I've been watching these episodes like crazy... Earlier today I saw the recipe for Daigakuimo and it looks like something that would be super easy to get the ingredients for since it's pretty much sweet potatoes (I assume any sweet potato would work?), sugar, oil, and black sesame seeds.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Stottie Kyek posted:

It's been floating around the Internet a while but the recipes from Cooking with Dog are actually really good - I tried the mochi and okonomiyaki recipes and they turned out nice. And the show's hosted by a big grey poodle.

Francis is most likely a toy poodle. A 'big poodle' would be a Standard Poodle, which weighs up to 70 lbs. Francis looks like he weighs about 10.

He is, however, fantastically well groomed and fluffy. And so well behaved! His chef obviously loves him. It's a joy to watch them

Suspect Bucket fucked around with this message at Sep 16, 2014 around 03:48

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Obeast posted:

Thanks! I'll probably check out the place in Modesto since that's the closest that I've seen. A couple people in the comments section on bringmyfishback's link mentioned Stockton and Modesto, but those are a little farther off than I'd like (although everything feels far around here since the towns and cities are pretty spread out). Still, it's good to have an idea of where these stores are located so I can check them out whenever I'm in the area.

I discovered Cooking With Dog a few days ago and I've been watching these episodes like crazy... Earlier today I saw the recipe for Daigakuimo and it looks like something that would be super easy to get the ingredients for since it's pretty much sweet potatoes (I assume any sweet potato would work?), sugar, oil, and black sesame seeds.

If you can get to Stockton, you might as well go all the way into SF, frankly! And then your life is nothing but Japanese everything.

5MinuteButtermilk
Mar 4, 2014


EVG posted:

Just checking to see if this is legit or a troll. Because it sounds kinda delicious, and kinda trashy at the same time.

Delicious and trashy is exactly what it is. It is probably one of the least healthy meals I make, but it's so good. Eating it on a cold winter day is a joy.

5MinuteButtermilk fucked around with this message at Sep 16, 2014 around 23:26

flesh dance
May 6, 2009



Thanks to your post I have a batch of that going in my crockpot right now!

I'd never used that curry stuff before and almost held off due to said salt & badness, but gently caress it the recipe sounded awesome

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



5MinuteButtermilk posted:

Delicious and trashy is exactly what it is. It is probably one of the least healthy meals I make, but it's so good. Eating it on a cold winter day is a joy.

I just dipped a hot dog in a bun in Japanese curry sauce like a French dip sandwich. No regrets. Trashy as hell but turn down for what.

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Tendales
Mar 9, 2012


Use Japanese curry as gravy on mashed potatoes. Don't question it, just do it.

When you're ready to step up your total disrespect for food, use Japanese curry as gravy on colcannon.

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