Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«30 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


I will ship some goddamn kombu, because kelp is king and you shouldn't have to make bonito dashi without it. It's hosed and I hate it.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

If you've got a Whole Foods in your area, they sell it in the Asian foods zone. Usually Eden brand. It's not a fantastic deal, but it's there.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



I just get both off Amazon cuz the big bags are cheaper than my local Japanese grocery.

kirtar
Sep 11, 2011


Yeah, I'm planning on just ordering it off amazon or something. The closest store that is more likely to have it is 60 miles away so it will cost less to just order it than to spend a couple hours and a couple gallons of gas.

Fates End
Oct 17, 2009


A little while back, I made some tonkotsu ramen from scratch, but I haven't actually gotten around to compiling all my pictures of the making together until now.
(Excuse the picture quality, my phone is a potato.)



I made the ramen from a couple of recipes. The first was Kenji's broth recipe, which necessitates a whole lot of chopped up trotters (and a chicken carcass to mellow out the pigginess). Personal note, they were softer than I thought they would be.



A lot of blood and gunk came out after an overnight soak, but even after dumping the water I could tell just by looking that there was plenty more left.



So I blanched them and dumped them in the sink.



After a nice scrubbing and chopsticking, the bones were as clean as an unused whistle.

It quickly became clear when I tried to add my leeks that my biggest pot was too small for this endeavour, so ran out in my pajamas to purchase the single shittiest cooking vessel I've ever owned.



It'll do.



Everybody into the pool, fatback, water, vegetables charred and uncharred.



A few hours of boiling later, the fatback was the consistency of jello and bleeding liquid lard. It got banished to the refrigerator, while the rest of the broth remained to boil all night and morning. This is the only thing I've ever made that I've just turned the heat down to low overnight instead of just being done with at least one component.



With even the toughest ingredients losing cohesion, it was finally time to start reducing.



Of course, it's fairly difficult to tell how much three quarts is without measuring, especially when half the pot is full of bone shards and leek paste.

Once I was reasonably satisfied, I strained it a few times, chopped up and reintroduced the earlier banished lard block, and emulsified the broth with my stick blender.



Nice and creamy, perfect to chill into a weird porcine mousse.

Broth, however, is not the only component of ramen. Next we need a tare; in my case, I'm using the tare from Ramen_Lord's recipe.



Niboshi, AKA dried baby anchovies.



Gutting them took a while, though it wasn't too hard. They smell shockingly similar to fish food.



Kombu, rehydrated, after way too much of an ordeal. I need to find a store that sells a better brand, because the only brand of kombu at the asian supermarket I got this from doubles as low grit sandpaper. When one has to filter their kombu water multiple times to get all the sand out, something has gone wrong.



Added the kombu water to some katsuobushi, tried to keep it at 176 degrees, which is a bitch and a half when one does not have a sous vide machine.



The dashi, strained.



Soy sauce, sake, and mirin, mixed and heated, glimmering like an oil slick in the mid day sun. When everything came together, shoyu tare was born.



Chashu, cooked according to Kenji's recipe, chilled, and sliced thin.



egg



The gang's all here. As much as I'd like to use fresh, fresh ramen noodles that I know for sure are decent are hard to come by in this city, even at the asian grocery stores.

Now for the assembly.



Tare.



Broth and noodles.



Toppings.



The assembled bowl, in different lighting.

This is amazing. The purest of porky goodness, throughout the whole bowl. Like someone took a slow smoked pork butt or fall off the bone ribs and liquefied it. The egg, though, I could take or leave. Maybe I didn't marinate it long enough? The pieces freeze well too; the broth absolutely will not fall out of emulsion, even after a month of freezing and a reheat from a block of ziploc'd pig-ice.

Fates End fucked around with this message at Jul 28, 2018 around 02:25

GhostofJohnMuir
Aug 14, 2014

anime is not good


i know you said you didn't like the egg as much as the rest, but the consistency of the yolk looks real nice

Fates End
Oct 17, 2009


GhostofJohnMuir posted:

i know you said you didn't like the egg as much as the rest, but the consistency of the yolk looks real nice

Yeah, I did those in my instant pot. Turns out pressure cooking eggs makes it really easy to control how set it is.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006



recommend a good brand of dashi powder? Something on Amazon and not too expensive.

GhostofJohnMuir
Aug 14, 2014

anime is not good


Arglebargle III posted:

recommend a good brand of dashi powder? Something on Amazon and not too expensive.

i use hondashi, but that's just family brand loyalty. i've never compared it to anything else, but the dashi i make with it always tastes fine

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Hondashi is also the only storebought one Iíve ever tried. Seems fine I guess

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


Uhh. hondashi is Japanese for dashi powder. You probably mean ajinomoto brand. They're the guys who invented msg.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Yeah, ajinomoto is reliable and you can get a big resealable bag of their dashi granules for cheap. Trivia: They sell their MSG stateside as Accent, I think.

gamingCaffeinator
Sep 6, 2010

I shall sing you the song of my people.


POOL IS CLOSED posted:

Yeah, ajinomoto is reliable and you can get a big resealable bag of their dashi granules for cheap. Trivia: They sell their MSG stateside as Accent, I think.

Is that who sells it? I use Accent MSG for some cooking stuff. I'll have to look into getting some of their dashi.

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


The best quick-make dashi comes from the packs that consist basically of bonito (plus some other fish) and some kelp in, without any MSG. You boil the packs for about 2-3 minutes and you have really good dashi. The issue with the MSG packs is that the flavor of the dashi is biting (has a mouthfeel like MSG, and is salty and dehydrating), but they are fine for general purpose or if you dont have any availability.

I'm a crazy person who cooks Japanese food a lot, so I actually make my stock from scratch on the weekends and freeze or refrigerate them though. I also have a bunch of high quality leftover bonito from my last trip to Japan so the quality of the produced stock ends up tasting like a ryotei.



Lazyfood, takes like 4 minutes to make.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


Not for me. I have hosed those up every time I tried, and sweetened eggs taste very strange.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


ntan1 posted:

The best quick-make dashi comes from the packs that consist basically of bonito (plus some other fish) and some kelp in, without any MSG.
Brace yourself for the hondashi brigade to koolaid man into the thread to tell you how wrong you are.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Pollyanna posted:

Not for me. I have hosed those up every time I tried, and sweetened eggs taste very strange.

There's the dashimaki style which is savory instead. Might be more to your taste!

mystes
May 31, 2006



Babylon Astronaut posted:

Uhh. hondashi is Japanese for dashi powder. You probably mean ajinomoto brand. They're the guys who invented msg.
I'm pretty sure Hondashi is ajinomoto's trademark for its brand of dashi powder.

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Gravy Boat 2k

After years of meaning to get one I got a tamagoyaki pan on amazon, its awesome and they always turn out great now.

It was 20 bucks its this one

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N4N2EP4

Soricidus
Oct 20, 2010
freedom-hating statist shill

Pillbug

mystes posted:

I'm pretty sure Hondashi is ajinomoto's trademark for its brand of dashi powder.

yeah itís confusing because it sounds like itíll be a generic term like honmirin, but hondashi is indeed a specific brand

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



There used to be a tonkatsu place by me, that I'd eat at all the time, and I loved it. I had to stop eating there for a couple months because money was getting tight, and recently I found out that they closed down, which I'm pretty unhappy about

Is tonkatsu something I could easily make at home?

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Fried cutlets are super easy.

Here's a tonkatsu recipe for a thick cut, which includes the cabbage of deceit: https://norecipes.com/tonkatsu/

Here's a katsudon recipe which includes how to do the more common thin style (pretty similar to wienerschnitzel): https://cookingwithdog.com/recipe/katsudon/

Have fun!

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


Katsu is easy to make as long as you are ok with stinking up your kitchen with boiling oil.

Both recipes are really close to the same above, but a couple of things:

Three plates, one for flour, another for egg, and the third for panko. Use you right hand for coating in flower, place into egg pan without touching the egg. Use your left hand to coat the meat with egg, then transfer to the panko pan also with your left hand, so as to avoid getting your hands too gross.

Definitely use a meat pounder and pound your meat so it's soft.

For large think slab of pork, double fry. Basically, fry for 2-3 minutes, put the piece aside for 3-4 while it cooks using the oil, then fry again.

Ajinomoto is the inventor of MSG, and it's known as ajinomoto. They make hondashi, which obviously has ajinomoto in it. Real dashi and packed bonito + seaweed instead of powder are at a different level, but take various amounts of extra time (10-15 minutes for the former, 3 minutes for the latter) to make over hondashi.

Mons Hubris
Aug 29, 2004

fanci flup




Onigiri troubleshooting:

I tried my hand at making some tuna mayo onigiri after getting back from Japan recently and enjoying the ones at the convenience stores.

I made some Nishiki brand rice in a rice cooker and just made a basic tuna salad with canned tuna in water and kewpie mayo. When I rolled them up, the rice had cooled to room temp and sat probably another hour. I ate one and refrigerated the rest. The filling came out good but a little dry, and the rice stuck together pretty well to make the triangle shape, but the texture of the rice is all wrong. Itís super dry and the individual grains come apart when you chew it. Are the convenience store ones not refrigerated for more than a few hours? Was the problem letting the rice cool? Where did I go wrong?

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Mons Hubris posted:

Onigiri troubleshooting:

I tried my hand at making some tuna mayo onigiri after getting back from Japan recently and enjoying the ones at the convenience stores.

I made some Nishiki brand rice in a rice cooker and just made a basic tuna salad with canned tuna in water and kewpie mayo. When I rolled them up, the rice had cooled to room temp and sat probably another hour. I ate one and refrigerated the rest. The filling came out good but a little dry, and the rice stuck together pretty well to make the triangle shape, but the texture of the rice is all wrong. Itís super dry and the individual grains come apart when you chew it. Are the convenience store ones not refrigerated for more than a few hours? Was the problem letting the rice cool? Where did I go wrong?

The rice you used probably isn't starchy enough. Japanese rice is short grained and very starchy, so you'll want that or something similar. If you can't find Japanese rice, look for something suitable for risotto, Arborio or w/e, and give that a go.

*edit*
Sorry, I checked this Nishiki stuff and it appears to be a medium grain rice. You want a short grain.

Stringent fucked around with this message at Sep 10, 2018 around 23:36

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


Nishiki *should* work, although it's not the best rice for it since it's calrose. Try Tamaki gold for a california koshihikari instead, which will help.

Try a couple of things:
- If the rice grains are hard, it means that you didn't use enough water. You don't want to add too much water esp. for onigiri, but too little isnt good. To make rice with the best sticky consistency, after the rice goes off and before you use the paddle to mix the rice, take a large cloth and put it over the rice bowl for about 2 minutes.
- Make onigiri when the rice is warm or hot. It sticks way better.

*edit* loving beaten by Stringent

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

I use medium grain almost all the time. The trick is definitely forming while still quite warm or even hot with that rice. You've got to be firm while shaping it too. You're not trying to turn that stuff into dough, but don't be too ginger with it.

Squeezy Farm
Jun 16, 2009


what do yall like dropping yuzu kosho in

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


I try it in almost everything. It's particularly good for fish with the whole citrus thing going on.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Squeezy Farm posted:

what do yall like dropping yuzu kosho in

Chicken noodle soup! Salad dressing! In a marinade! With noodles! That poo poo makes everything better

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Gravy Boat 2k

The whole foods has maitake mushrooms and they're pretty expensive.

I've never had them but I think they used to use them in iron chef, whats a good dish to make out of them?

Thoht
Aug 3, 2006



They're really good, one of my favorite mushrooms. Sear them hard until they're golden brown and crisping and finish them by basting with butter and thyme.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



hakimashou posted:

The whole foods has maitake mushrooms and they're pretty expensive.

I've never had them but I think they used to use them in iron chef, whats a good dish to make out of them?

I got you, fam

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Gravy Boat 2k


Ty that looks tasty.

I got some mushrooms yesterday but I don't have any lapsang soochong, I've got pu er though so I think i might try it with that.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Earlier this year I collected a bunch of resources on Japanese blogs in an attempt to make something like moyan curry. Until recently I've never really had anything that didn't come in a brick, and after hitting up some places in D.C. that blew my mind it reinvigorated my efforts. I still haven't ordered some drat moyan but my attempts here are based on the information I collected. Spoiler: it's the best drat Japanese curry I've had and this will probably become a Friday night ritual until the day I die.

Here are the ingredients based on the jar

code:
Vegetable ∑ Fruit (Onion, Tomato, Banana, Carrots, Apples, Garlic, Celery)
Curry Roux
Meat Extract (Chicken, Pork)
Chutney
Butter
Worcester sauce
Curry paste
Yeast extract
Edible fats and oils
Fish meal
Spice
Caramel pigment
The first thing that hit me is how similar the primary ingredients are to the "base gravy" used in Indian restaurants. The base is universal, and we can add different ingredients to create different curries much like how good ramen has the multiple parts. So first step is making the "base gravy" and here a pressure cooker is invaluable in saving time! I recommend a pressure cooker in every kitchen, I probably use it more than the stove.

About 1,000 grams of yellow onions fried with a teaspoon or two of baking soda until they release all their liquid and begin to turn dark about 5 minutes.



Cook at high pressure for 20 minutes. In the meantime I've got some shallots from like 4 months ago turning mushy so I'm going to use sous vide to pickle them in a brine of rice vinegar and sugar.

I let the onions release their pressure naturally (about 20 minutes) then cook a little longer. While waiting I broil the fruits and vegetables. Halfway through I remove the skins from the blistered tomatoes.



I should've browned them further but was in a rush to get them into the pot (not pictured: garlic don't forgot your garlic!)





After 30 minutes at high pressure all the ingredients are well cooked and I hit it with an immersion blender into a thick slurry. Much to my surprise it had the flavor profile of the really high end curry I had in D.C. so already I'm super excited to finish. I jar the gravy and put one in the freezer as a test and one in the fridge.



Later on I prepare the curry. I fry my spice mix (based on S&B's ingredients list, I change the ratio so turmeric isn't the primary ingredient) in a healthy dollop of butter at medium heat until the butter starts to foam and clarify. It should have the faint aroma of ghee (and come to think of it I should try just using ghee).



To this I add my soup base. I happen to have leftover tonkotsu broth made with chicken feet and pork feet. In the future when I don't have an 18 hour long broth available I would make a cheat version by adding a packet of gelatin to water and some "better than bouillon" chicken and pork.

At this point I add umami. Yeast extract (I use vegemite because I like the flavoring), katsuobushi (I'll probably prepare niboshi in the future), and instead of adding Worcestershire (which I assume they're talking about the Bull Dog style tonkatsu sauce) I cheat and add some fish sauce for saltiness.

The only meat I have at the moment is some chicken which I brown separately and add to the curry, simmering covered until the chicken is cooked.



Without adding any thickening agents the curry is so thick that it coats the back of a spoon.



But, and this may be controversial, instead of using a roux I simply stir in a pinch of coconut flour. Coconut flour is common in Indian curries and I find it integrates more consistently, resulting in a silkier texture. The description on Moyan's website says their vegetable base is so thick that they add only the bare minimum amount of roux for thickness and sure enough, after simmering for 20 minutes that was true. The dash of salt you'd add to your morning eggs is how much coconut powder I added to get the perfect consistency.



Topped off the chicken with tonkatsu sauce, added my pickled shallots and a dollop of Indian mango chutney. Not going to win any points for presentation but drat that flavor! I wish I had the vocabulary to describe it but if anyone ever asked me "what the hell is umami" this is what I would offer them. There are a few tweaks I want to make before solidifying it in a recipe, namely a quick-and-easy soup I can whip up on the fly and a special dashi with all the umami elements. The actual cooking time was only about 3 hours with 75% of that being the pressure cooker so as long as you have the base curry available dinner will be ready when the rice is done.

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002
I LOVE MY ASSAULT RIFLE 15 WITH ITS HIGH CAPACITY CLIP/MAGAZINE


Gravy Boat 2k

That looks really good, and I, too, dig glenfarclas 17.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Very cool, I'm a big fan of Moyan as well. Thanks for the write up.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


In episode 4 of Today's Menu for the Emiya Family, they make a sandwich out of crispy bacon, scrambled eggs, blanched sansai, and a mustard spread. I want to make this, but I'm not sure what common USA greens are analogous to sansai. Broccoli rabe and fiddleheads, maybe? Is there a closer alternative?

EDIT: It looks like they're specifically using nanohana in the sandwich, if that helps.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

drrockso20
May 6, 2013

Garnet, Amethyst, and Pearl and FOURTEEN KARAT GOLD!!!

Warning: SU Season 3 Spoilers


Pollyanna posted:

In episode 4 of Today's Menu for the Emiya Family, they make a sandwich out of crispy bacon, scrambled eggs, blanched sansai, and a mustard spread. I want to make this, but I'm not sure what common USA greens are analogous to sansai. Broccoli rabe and fiddleheads, maybe? Is there a closer alternative?

EDIT: It looks like they're specifically using nanohana in the sandwich, if that helps.

I'll always find it hilarious that a series as serious and grim as the FATE series has such lighthearted and often rather goofy spinoff series

Also just watched the first episode and it was really cute and informative, also makes me really want to try a Kotatsu someday, as it looks really comfy

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«30 »