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hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Nanigans posted:

My wife likes sake, and I was hoping to get us a nice bottle and maybe a drink set for our anniversary in a few weeks. I'm looking for something in the $60-100 range. Any recommendations? She likes both hot and cold sake.

Would you say she likes dry or sweet sake better?

I am not a huge sake drinker but I think Dassai is pretty good.

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Nanigans
Aug 31, 2005

~Waku Waku~


hallo spacedog posted:

Would you say she likes dry or sweet sake better?

I am not a huge sake drinker but I think Dassai is pretty good.

She likes dry sake, but I'm sure she'd like sweet too. We've really only tried sake at a few places, and they either didn't list what brand they serve, or I didn't pay attention.

I think we'll go to our sushi place this weekend and I'll ask them the brand when she's not looking.

Mongoose
Jul 7, 2005


Nanigans posted:

She likes dry sake, but I'm sure she'd like sweet too. We've really only tried sake at a few places, and they either didn't list what brand they serve, or I didn't pay attention.

I think we'll go to our sushi place this weekend and I'll ask them the brand when she's not looking.

Even in a given brand, the different sake they produce will have completely different flavors. I'd say get any Ginjo or Daiginjo (other than Gekkeikan) and have it as an after-dinner drink. Dry ginjo and daiginjos will still be fairly sweet, while sweet ones will be very fruity and sweet. It's hard to wrong once you're out of the futsushu, honjozo level, just by choosing ginjo / daiginjo you'll be in the top 10% of sake.

e: You might even have more fun getting a few different small bottles--one Nigori, one daiginjo, one tanrei dry junmai like Hakkaisan.

Mongoose fucked around with this message at Oct 31, 2018 around 03:56

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Getting a bunch of the 300 ml bottles is the way to go, just don't be like me and forget to mark down any you particularly like.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

I died in 2007

I went shopping today and got some imported sweets for the hell of it. The Hokkaido matcha milk candy are very pleasant, not too sweet but oddly creamy in flavor for a hard candy. I also got some dark chocolate Kit Kat, which was about how you might expect (much less sweeter than American dark chocolate Kit Kat).

I'm thinking about trying to make gyoza soon, but I always feel really intimidated about making dumplings with a filling. The idea of filling something with raw meat and then cooking it makes me anxious because I'm afraid the meat won't be cooked through, but I won't trust a temperature probe if I can't actually see the meat inside. I guess this is why I always end up making curry!

I've also thought about making korokke from Thanksgiving leftovers (primarily the turkey and stuffing for the filling), but I wanted to ask the people in this thread if they've ever tried this and if they might have any advice. Korokke are pretty simple, but I wonder if "Thanksgiving dinner in a korokke" would turn out as well as it seems in my imagination.

Nanigans
Aug 31, 2005

~Waku Waku~


Thanks, guys! That sounds like great advice. Would I need to travel to a specialty place for those? I imagine you canít really order alcohol online or get those at most local liquor stores...

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


It depends where you are. You're unlikely to find sake other than Gekkeikan at a normal liquor store, unless you're on the west coast or like NYC. There's probably a Japanese supermarket somewhere that will have a larger selection, and I believe you can order sake online because it's wine level alcohol and not liquor, but that depends on the state. https://www.truesake.com/ is worth checking out I guess.

https://www.justonecookbook.com/jap...United%20States

Might be helpful. Some of those are generic Asian stores with Japanese food and likely won't have sake.

Carillon
May 9, 2014



I know this is cooking and not restaurants, but I'm going to be in Japan in a few weeks and any recommendations of great restaurants in Tokyo or Kyoto would be lovely! I've looked at the Michelin guide for Tokyo for instance and a lot looks great, but it's definitely an overwhelming food city given both the wealth of options as well as the different language.

Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Carillon posted:

I know this is cooking and not restaurants, but I'm going to be in Japan in a few weeks and any recommendations of great restaurants in Tokyo or Kyoto would be lovely! I've looked at the Michelin guide for Tokyo for instance and a lot looks great, but it's definitely an overwhelming food city given both the wealth of options as well as the different language.

https://tabelog.com/en/

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Not really related, but this past summer, there were two Vicky Pollard types at my local ramen joint asking for "hot sacky." It was roughly 38 degrees out. Then they complained that "it didn't taste like wine." It was very hard not to laugh.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Tabelog is pretty drat legit unlike Yelp which is a cointoss of Actually Pretty Good/Mysteriously High Reviews For No Reason/Really Good But Doesn't Cater To White People So Bad Score

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


The Japan tourism thread has a lot of restaurant recommendations and links to Tokyo goon restaurant lists all nicely pinned on maps:

https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...er=140#lastpost

Go back through the last ten pages or so and you should find a bunch. The burnt miso ramen at Gogyo Ramen in Kyoto is one you shouldn't miss imo. They also have burnt soy sauce, last time I got a bowl of each and this is a good way to live your life.

Carillon
May 9, 2014



That's awesome thanks for the help.

LyonsLions
Oct 10, 2008

I'm only using 18% of my full power !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


im on the net me boys posted:

I went shopping today and got some imported sweets for the hell of it. The Hokkaido matcha milk candy are very pleasant, not too sweet but oddly creamy in flavor for a hard candy. I also got some dark chocolate Kit Kat, which was about how you might expect (much less sweeter than American dark chocolate Kit Kat).

I'm thinking about trying to make gyoza soon, but I always feel really intimidated about making dumplings with a filling. The idea of filling something with raw meat and then cooking it makes me anxious because I'm afraid the meat won't be cooked through, but I won't trust a temperature probe if I can't actually see the meat inside. I guess this is why I always end up making curry!

I've also thought about making korokke from Thanksgiving leftovers (primarily the turkey and stuffing for the filling), but I wanted to ask the people in this thread if they've ever tried this and if they might have any advice. Korokke are pretty simple, but I wonder if "Thanksgiving dinner in a korokke" would turn out as well as it seems in my imagination.

When you cook gyoza you fry and then steam it so it gets pretty well cooked.

Thanksgiving korokke sounds like a great idea to me because youíve already done the work of cooking the fillings and all thatís left is the frying. I dislike making korokke because of all the steps involved but if you already have mashed potatoes and cooked meat youíre almost there.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Carillon posted:

I know this is cooking and not restaurants, but I'm going to be in Japan in a few weeks and any recommendations of great restaurants in Tokyo or Kyoto would be lovely! I've looked at the Michelin guide for Tokyo for instance and a lot looks great, but it's definitely an overwhelming food city given both the wealth of options as well as the different language.

It's a bit heavy on non-Japanese food, but here's a list of places I like.

https://foursquare.com/user/53160958/list/restaurants

For context, the reason it's heavy on non-Japanese food is because finding good Japanese food in Tokyo is shooting fish in a barrel. If you know what style of food you want, location and price range it shouldn't take five minutes to find something on tabelog.

Stringent fucked around with this message at Oct 31, 2018 around 23:37

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

I died in 2007

LyonsLions posted:

When you cook gyoza you fry and then steam it so it gets pretty well cooked.

Thanksgiving korokke sounds like a great idea to me because you’ve already done the work of cooking the fillings and all that’s left is the frying. I dislike making korokke because of all the steps involved but if you already have mashed potatoes and cooked meat you’re almost there.

Making korokke is time consuming, so that's why I always make someone else help. My partner can't really say no if he's eating with me!

Noslo
Mar 29, 2007



Does anyone have experience with DIY sushi?

The FDA says to freeze fish at -4 Farenheit (-20 Celcius) for 7 days or flash freeze to -31 Farenheit (-40 Celcius) followed by storing it back at -4F for 24 hours.

And unfortunately, there's no other information about scaling for temperatures inbetween that range....

Because I recently bought a small medical grade freezer which advertises -4Far. However, some of the reviews have said they were able to go even lower like -20F.

So otherwise I'm going full mad scientist with a -97 Farenheit cooling bath of ethanol and dry ice. Wish me luck!

Noslo fucked around with this message at Nov 9, 2018 around 19:02

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

al-azad posted:

I hope you mean coconut flour and not oil! What umami ingredients do you plan on using? Yeast extract and sea salt are a must IMO but for beef I would also consider something naturally salty like Worcestershire, maggi sauce, or anchovy paste.

So kinda late in coming back to this but I got me some marmite, katsuobushi, and also dug out my tin of mushroom powder and tossed some of each into the portion I was reheating, and it really rounded it out and I hella enjoyed it. Now to actually figure out if one of them was the magic ingredient or if it's really just better with all of them in it.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


It's always good to have more than one. I like the anchovy paste or fish sauce/marmite/soy sauce combo for punching up sauces.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Yeast extract was a new discovery for me this year and I don't know how I lived without it. I remember there always being a stigma around it but just like MSG the old xenophobic stigmas are wrong wrong wrong.

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


Noslo posted:

Does anyone have experience with DIY sushi?

The FDA says to freeze fish at -4 Farenheit (-20 Celcius) for 7 days or flash freeze to -31 Farenheit (-40 Celcius) followed by storing it back at -4F for 24 hours.

And unfortunately, there's no other information about scaling for temperatures inbetween that range....

Because I recently bought a small medical grade freezer which advertises -4Far. However, some of the reviews have said they were able to go even lower like -20F.

So otherwise I'm going full mad scientist with a -97 Farenheit cooling bath of ethanol and dry ice. Wish me luck!

If it's from the ocean (and not farmed), and immediately caught, you don't need to freeze it?

I dont know what the question is. Also the FDA's standards are different from Japan, and while some fish is always preserved/frozen, not all fish are.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Wouldn't eating unfrozen wild fish directly from the sea open you up to gnarly rear end parasites

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


Yes, by a small but minuscule amount. But a lot of fish in Japan, including fish intended to be consumed raw, isn't frozen and only transported chilled.

Again: caught fish needs to be chilled (but not necessarily frozen) quickly when caught (or kept in clean water), and probably should be caught either in a very clean lake or directly from the ocean (and not farmed).

Noslo
Mar 29, 2007



ntan1 posted:

If it's from the ocean (and not farmed), and immediately caught, you don't need to freeze it?

I dont know what the question is. Also the FDA's standards are different from Japan, and while some fish is always preserved/frozen, not all fish are.

Yeah it was poorly worded.

What I was ideally hoping to find was another country's version of FDA standards for safe freezing. Ideally one that is more of an incremental system like -5 for x time, then -10, then -15 and so forth.

This is because the FDA numbers are just -4 and -31, nothing in between, and the freezer I bought goes to -20. Also, I'm impatient.

I'm familiar with the fresh caught aspects and that traditional sushi chefs are trained as to what to look for regarding species' respective parasites. Neither of those are applicable to me though, hence DIY sushi.

What I'm really looking for is to be able to buy fish at Kroger or Costco, take it home, and make safe sushi.


Also I did end up doing the dry ice concoction. Not sure how cold it really got because it passed the thermometers minimum which is -60F. Froze to my floor, with a buffer, and it almost pulled a tile off. Made tuna nigiri for dinner after 2 hours in the bath. Going to make the salmon tonight. Will update thread if I get sick or start making GBS threads worms.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

I died in 2007

Noslo posted:

Will update thread if I get sick or start making GBS threads worms.

Thought "Tokyo Anal Dynamite" while reading this

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Just buy saltwater fish that doesn't smell weird/is already frozen and eat it. You'll be fine. If you have an actual fish market around try them instead of Kroger. There should be at least one if you're in a city of any size, even well away from the coast.

GhostofJohnMuir
Aug 14, 2014

anime is not good


on one hand the fda are bunch of pocket protector sporting cowards

on the other hand some of those sea worms look scary as gently caress

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


I mean, what do you think people in Japan and Korea do? You just go to the grocery store and buy fish like anywhere else.

They do have a higher rate of parasites from it, but "higher" is still very low and if you get one you just take some medicine. In Korea people even take an anti-parasite pill yearly just as a prophylactic.

Noslo
Mar 29, 2007



Grand Fromage posted:

Just buy saltwater fish that doesn't smell weird/is already frozen and eat it. You'll be fine. If you have an actual fish market around try them instead of Kroger. There should be at least one if you're in a city of any size, even well away from the coast.

I know this is 100% the correct way to go about it. And it has been my starting ground so far.

But part of my new hobby/experiment/obsession is to take my sushi further. Safely, ideally.

The forbidden fruit of freshwater catch must be tasted. But how?? This is my struggle.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Freshwater is actually the older form of sushi. You can just go for it, or there's the old school fermented kind called narezushi that they do around Lake Biwa.

Trout in particular is only eaten raw in Korea, which I discovered when I tried to buy a trout and my friend was utterly stumped when I told her I planned to cook it. She didn't think it was possible to cook a trout.

Grand Fromage fucked around with this message at Nov 14, 2018 around 04:30

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


It doesn't help that in the Midwestern US, fish quality is shockingly bad because it doesn't sell.

You can tell if a fish is fresh by smelling it. The fishier it smells, the less fresh it is.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


That's why you need to find your local fish seller that supplies the restaurants, they move product quickly. I can get fish just as good and cheaper in Ohio than I ever could in Korea, when I lived like five kilometers from the ocean. An admittedly bizarre situation but

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Noslo
Mar 29, 2007



Grand Fromage posted:

That's why you need to find your local fish seller that supplies the restaurants, they move product quickly. I can get fish just as good and cheaper in Ohio than I ever could in Korea, when I lived like five kilometers from the ocean. An admittedly bizarre situation but

Good call, I'll seek out the fishmonger this weekend.

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