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Texibus
May 18, 2008


My darling would like an Authentic Japanese Cook Book for Christmas, do y'all have any good suggestions?

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Forcyte
Nov 22, 2013


I bought this one recently after reading a review of it somewhere.

Japanese Farm Food

I haven't gone through too many of the recipes yet myself, but they're pretty simple in general, just that some of the ingredients may be hard to find (though that's probably true for anyone not living near an asian market). I'm recommending it because it's more than just a cookbook; the author is basically writing about a lifestyle that includes some nice recipes, so it's actually a pretty interesting read.

If you're interested, Amazon currently has a promotion going on that's offering 25% off any physical book purchase with the following promo code: BOOKDEAL25.

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


Texibus posted:

My darling would like an Authentic Japanese Cook Book for Christmas, do y'all have any good suggestions?

I recommend these three. I have the most fun with the Izakaya book, though.

Izakaya: The Japanese Pub Cookbook

Washoku

Japanese Hot Pots

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Forcyte posted:

I bought this one recently after reading a review of it somewhere.

Japanese Farm Food


Hey, I saw an episode about her on Begin Japanology the other day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldxEEKvmFD4

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Forcyte posted:

I bought this one recently after reading a review of it somewhere.

Japanese Farm Food

I haven't gone through too many of the recipes yet myself, but they're pretty simple in general, just that some of the ingredients may be hard to find (though that's probably true for anyone not living near an asian market). I'm recommending it because it's more than just a cookbook; the author is basically writing about a lifestyle that includes some nice recipes, so it's actually a pretty interesting read.

If you're interested, Amazon currently has a promotion going on that's offering 25% off any physical book purchase with the following promo code: BOOKDEAL25.

I have ordered this book! It is a very nice book! Thanks for the coupon!

taichara
May 9, 2013

c:\>erase c:\reality.sys copy a:\gigacity\*.* c:


Mr. Wiggles posted:

I have ordered this book! It is a very nice book! Thanks for the coupon!

Fair warning: I also have that book and while the recipes are nice, the writer is ... not so nice. Kind of self-righteous and gaggy at times about her "simple farm life" while she insists on spending on organic local only for everything, not just food, and tosses money away at things like hoarding antique containers bought from markets. If you're any way on a budget, she can be annoying.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

taichara posted:

Fair warning: I also have that book and while the recipes are nice, the writer is ... not so nice. Kind of self-righteous and gaggy at times about her "simple farm life" while she insists on spending on organic local only for everything, not just food, and tosses money away at things like hoarding antique containers bought from markets. If you're any way on a budget, she can be annoying.

I grow most of my own vegetables and use mostly antique containers so it must be right up my alley!

This is a thing most farm people do because we tend to have lots of old stuff hanging around, and we also, you know, grow stuff.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Sjurygg posted:

Hey, I saw an episode about her on Begin Japanology the other day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldxEEKvmFD4

Has anyone here made their own soy sauce? Sounds like a cool project.

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


d3rt posted:

Has anyone here made their own soy sauce? Sounds like a cool project.

how difficult would this be? can you post your own recipe so i can get an idea?

Two Worlds
Feb 3, 2009



I'm looking for some really good, aggressive, smoky katsuoboshi. Any recommendations?

taichara
May 9, 2013

c:\>erase c:\reality.sys copy a:\gigacity\*.* c:


Mr. Wiggles posted:

I grow most of my own vegetables and use mostly antique containers so it must be right up my alley!

This is a thing most farm people do because we tend to have lots of old stuff hanging around, and we also, you know, grow stuff.

There is a distinct difference between that and the antics in that book, including an anecdote where the author has the vapors when she discovered that the charcoal she's been using came from out of the country and wasn't pure artisanal, which was apparently a crime so terrible she had flashbacks to "the countless barbecued meals I had unwittingly infused with that soulless smoke".

But, you know, whatever.

indoflaven
Dec 10, 2009


d3rt posted:

Has anyone here made their own soy sauce? Sounds like a cool project.

There's 1000 things that would be cooler and worth your time. Making your own soy sauce would be like collecting your own salt.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

indoflaven posted:

There's 1000 things that would be cooler and worth your time. Making your own soy sauce would be like collecting your own salt.

Yeah this. The process takes something like nine months to a year, and you'd have to keep rolling batches going to keep yourself supplied. The same goes for miso. It could be sorta fun and interesting, but there is no way the effort to yield ratio would be anything close to worthwhile.

McSpergin
Sep 10, 2013


For anyone willing to try some easier recipes to get a grasp of some basic Japanese home cooking I recommend this book:

http://www.booktopia.com.au/japanes...CFUcIvAod0iUAKg

My recommendation from this book is their karaage, Nagoya Tebasaki, and their Osaka Okonomiyaki. My housemate complains we "eat too much asian food" (usually only once a week, but the guy also thought we'd been through 5x1.6 litre bottles of kikkoman, you can tell who doesn't cook in the house!!) but even if he hears the word Okonomiyaki, he gets excited about dinner because I follow their batter recipe then add the flavour of the day to it. It's fantastic with thinly sliced smoky bacon, but even traditionally with thin pork belly is great.

Also their Tebasaki is something else. Super umami rich sauce

And also Ivan Ramen is pretty good. His ramen is ridiculously detailed and time consuming, but stupidly delicious. But his best recommendations are usually those to use up leftovers. His teriyaki chicken is fantastic, you fry it in chicken fat

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


indoflaven posted:

There's 1000 things that would be cooler and worth your time. Making your own soy sauce would be like collecting your own salt.

HEY. Hey. Don't piss on salt collectors. Then you'll get weird piss salt in their very carefully tended salt marshes.

Also, the equipment needed for the most basic introductory seaside salt refining is some black tarps, 2x4s, sunny spot in yard, ocean (or salt lake), and time. I can't even imagine what the startup costs for soy sauce brewing would be.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

As far as I can tell the equipment isn't too involved: you could do it in Mason jars, and koji can be found in miso. The trouble is the turn- around time. When you make something fermented like this (eg homebrew beer), you have no way of knowing how it will turn out until it's done. Couple that with the paucity of recipes available online, and you could spend years just trying to dial in your recipe to be on par with a $5 bottle of Kikkoman.

E: if you really want to play with koji, make yourself some sake. The equipment is slightly more involved, but no more so than for beer brewing, and you get way more for your money and effort.

Lead out in cuffs fucked around with this message at Dec 22, 2014 around 19:54

SpicyUnagi
Jun 18, 2012


I figured this would be a better spot to ask, rather than the cooking product recommendation thread.

I spent a good part of last night trying to find higher end rice cookers that actually do not have a non-stick (non-Teflon) coated inner bowl. All of the reviews between Tiger, Zojirushi, and even some National/Panasonic models have either Aluminum clad bowls or some mixture of metal with a teflon-like coating. The reason I am looking for a non-coated bowl is that I have read so many complaints about the major brand bowls over the last 3 years. A good majority of them start to have the Teflon coating peel anywhere between 6 months-2 years after purchase, even after properly caring for them, and the companies charge an insane $100-150+shipping for a replacement bowl that will end up doing the exact same thing over time. A higher end rice cooker runs between $150-500, so why would I want to spend another $100-150 on just a bowl every time it fails? Stainless steel bowls shouldn't fail, albeit some rice may get stuck to the bottom occasionally, and I am ok with that.

I was expecting to spend $200-400 dollars to get a nicer model that I could use for 10 years and won't break badly.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Models that I looked through specifically:

Zojirushi:

NP-HBC10/18
http://www.zojirushi.com/products/nphbc
I've seen reviews that said this actually has a stainless steel inner bowl, but the actual inner bowl portion where the rice goes is still Teflon coated and not stainless steel. I was hovering towards this if I can get someone to confirm that the whole bowl is actually stainless w/o Teflon.

NS-YAC10/18
http://www.zojirushi.com/products/nsyac
Aluminum clad with Teflon-like coating

NS-ZCC10/18
http://www.zojirushi.com/products/nszcc
Aluminum clad with Teflon-like coating

Tiger:

JKT-S10U/S18U
http://usa.tiger-corporation.com/01ricecooker/01.html
Apparently Ceramic coated inner pot?

JKT-B10U/B18U
http://usa.tiger-corporation.com/01ricecooker/02.html
Aluminum clad bowl with Teflon-like coating

JAX-T10U/T18U
http://usa.tiger-corporation.com/01ricecooker/03.html
"Thick inner pot"

Panasonic/National:

All the ones I looked at that they sell now have Teflon-coated bowls...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'd like to hear if any of you own any of these models, if you have had problems with Teflon flaking or chipping off, or if you can confirm any of these models/or other models I don't have listed actually have a stainless steel/ceramic inner bowl and it hasn't caused you problems.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


Honestly, I've had this piece of poo poo from Target for 7 years and I've never had a single problem with it. Its in near-pristine condition and just works

And even though I don't need one and don't expect to, apparently replacement bowls are $8

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

After 4 years of using my zoji, i have only had teflon come off if metal tools scratch it off. No peeling from ordinary use.

SpicyUnagi
Jun 18, 2012


BraveUlysses posted:

After 4 years of using my zoji, i have only had teflon come off if metal tools scratch it off. No peeling from ordinary use.

Why are the replacement bowls so drat expensive?

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I don't know but I really wouldn't worry about it. I'm willing to believe that the bowl will last the lifespan of the appliance.

Even on the areas where I have scratched off the teflon, rice is not sticking to it at all since it makes up such a small percentage of the surface area.

Deathwing
Aug 16, 2008


BraveUlysses posted:

After 4 years of using my zoji, i have only had teflon come off if metal tools scratch it off. No peeling from ordinary use.

Same here, i've had my Zoji (NS-ZCC10) for almost 6 years, I don't think there's a single scratch on the interior. A few on the outside, but that's due to me being an idiot and scratching it against metal stuff in the sink accidentally, not an actual problem with the coating.

Ebbinate
Oct 26, 2002
Slide Ruler

I've seen full ceramic rice cooker bowls, but I don't remember the brand. They are fairly expensive though but the super heavy bowl is supposed to cook better.

Even my cheap $20 Meiji rice cooker bowls never had an issue. If you need to make them last longer, don't wash rice in the bowl, wash it in another bowl and transfer it.

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


SpicyUnagi posted:

Why are the replacement bowls so drat expensive?

SpicyUnagi posted:

the companies charge an insane $100-150+shipping for a replacement bowl

Echoing that I've had my Zoji for 4 years now and my bowl show no signs of chipping or anything. Besides, the Zoji bowl is $55 for the 10 cup model and $8 shipping. It's a bit expensive, yes, but nowhere near as bad as $100-150?

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


What do the crazy expensive rice cookers do that the cheap ones don't? Congee and stuff?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Riptor posted:

What do the crazy expensive rice cookers do that the cheap ones don't? Congee and stuff?

All kinds of things. I have a pressurized one we got last year after using the same one for about a decade, and the rice tastes really incredibly good.
It does do congee and all kinds of other specific settings too based on rice type. It also has fast cooking settings, and other stuff.
Also, yeah it will last for a long time most likely.

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Riptor posted:

What do the crazy expensive rice cookers do that the cheap ones don't? Congee and stuff?

More settings as opposed to On/Off, and some will also use fuzzy logic controllers.

For example, my panasonic is fuzzy logic enabled and has the following settings:
White rice
Brown rice
Quick cook
Time cook (set it to X, hit start, and the rice will be ready at X time, then go into hold mode)
Sushi rice
Porridge
Slow cook
Steam

http://home.howstuffworks.com/rice-cooker2.htm

Sex Hobbit
Jul 24, 2007

because we are cat


I have a cheap-rear end Krups rice cooker and let me tell you, it doesn't do those awesome pancakes.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

BraveUlysses posted:

After 4 years of using my zoji, i have only had teflon come off if metal tools scratch it off. No peeling from ordinary use.

Yeah echoing this. Five years with a Zojirushi and the teflon is pristine. Just don't use metal tools with it.

And having a brown rice setting owns.

E: as does being able to put rice in it before you go to work, and come home to only have to prep toppings.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Yeah echoing this. Five years with a Zojirushi and the teflon is pristine. Just don't use metal tools with it.

And having a brown rice setting owns.

E: as does being able to put rice in it before you go to work, and come home to only have to prep toppings.

as is programming it for breakfast, which reminds me that I need to try some jook asap

WerrWaaa
Nov 5, 2008

I can make all your dreams come true.

Anyone have recommendations for reasonable electric hot plates for cooking at the dinner table?

SpicyUnagi
Jun 18, 2012


hallo spacedog posted:

All kinds of things. I have a pressurized one we got last year after using the same one for about a decade, and the rice tastes really incredibly good.
It does do congee and all kinds of other specific settings too based on rice type. It also has fast cooking settings, and other stuff.
Also, yeah it will last for a long time most likely.

Does the GABA setting really make a difference for Brown rice?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


SpicyUnagi posted:

Does the GABA setting really make a difference for Brown rice?

I don't eat brown rice so I have no idea, sorry.

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


What do you guys think about using Saracha to spice up japanese dishes? Is this a taboo and I should stick to wasabi or should add it like I do to everthing else?

cyberia
Jun 24, 2011

Do not call me that!
Snuffles was my slave name.
You shall now call me Snowball; because my fur is pretty and white.

shankerz posted:

What do you guys think about using Saracha to spice up japanese dishes? Is this a taboo and I should stick to wasabi or should add it like I do to everthing else?

I normally use chilli powder in Japanese food. If you go to a Japanese / Asian grocer you can get shakers of shichimi which is a mix of chilli powder and other stuff and you just add to your food to taste.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Dried red chiles in the oil if you're using oil is also effective and good.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Ultimately you can certainly do whatever you want because it's your food, but traditionally there's almost no spice in Japanese food for real. Doesn't make it wrong at all for you to tweak to your taste though.

Helith
Nov 5, 2009

Basket of Adorables



College Slice

You can also get Japanese Chili oil which is just Sesame oil with chili in it and it's got a good kick to it. I find mine in the Japanese section of the Asian grocers I use here in Sydney. It's a condiment so it comes in small bottles, but I bet you could make your own too.

Nayato
Dec 28, 2005

smile :]


Helith posted:

You can also get Japanese Chili oil which is just Sesame oil with chili in it and it's got a good kick to it. I find mine in the Japanese section of the Asian grocers I use here in Sydney. It's a condiment so it comes in small bottles, but I bet you could make your own too.

This is also extremely delicious to eat just over a bowl of steaming hot rice. It's like... the ultimate comfort food.

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Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


hallo spacedog posted:

Ultimately you can certainly do whatever you want because it's your food, but traditionally there's almost no spice in Japanese food for real. Doesn't make it wrong at all for you to tweak to your taste though.

The chef at my sushi joint gave me sriracha salmon as a freebie and a spicy tuna roll. Who are the proper authorities to report this monster to.

Oh wait I dont care because I love my japafast. BTW, dont order eel or bluefin peeps, those guys are in a serious decline. Theremust be delicious left for the next generation.

Whats a good entry level sake for cooking and occasional sipping?

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