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hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me



I'd be more inclined to suspect the phenomenal amount of salt in curry roux than msg personally.

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Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

im on the net me boys posted:

Is there a Japanese Curry gang tag. If not I will make one

Sign me up!

Heath
Apr 29, 2008



hallo spacedog posted:

I'd be more inclined to suspect the phenomenal amount of salt in curry roux than msg personally.

So you're saying I shouldn't be drinking it straight

Hauki
May 11, 2010




Heath posted:

So you're saying I shouldn't be drinking it straight

well, poo poo, there goes tonight's plans

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012




FishBowlRobot posted:

Made some vegetarian sushi and gyoza the other day for some friends.




I usually dust the bottoms of the gyoza in flour, but corn starch got me that extra crispiness this time.

Sushi rolls are:

Cucumber, avocado, cream cheese
Garlic mushrooms, avocado, power greens, carrot
Balsamic soy asparagus, red bell pepper, cream cheese, avocado

What do you put in your gyoza? My wife is vegetarian and we're trying to figure out a good veggie dumpling/gyoza recipe, but I can't do mushrooms and cabbage is iffy, which cuts out two ingredients that come up in most recipes I see.

also how do you use the corn starch? do you just dab the gyoza in the starch before cooking them?

FishBowlRobot
Mar 21, 2006





MockingQuantum posted:

What do you put in your gyoza? My wife is vegetarian and we're trying to figure out a good veggie dumpling/gyoza recipe, but I can't do mushrooms and cabbage is iffy, which cuts out two ingredients that come up in most recipes I see.

also how do you use the corn starch? do you just dab the gyoza in the starch before cooking them?

These I used: garlic, ginger, onion, carrot, power greens, mushrooms, sesame oil, soy sauce, and salt.

Chopped spinach, etc works fine instead of cabbage. I saw a recipe that used quinoa, so that might be something else you can try instead of mushrooms if you donít want to use some kind of fake meat. Maybe even chopped rice noodles? Feel like Iíve seen that somewhere. I havenít used either, though.

For cornstarch, yeah, just dip/dab the bottoms of the dumplings in it. You can do it when preparing them, not necessarily right before cooking.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

I tried hayashi rice and brown stew mixes from the Japanese market (both S&B I think?) and they taste the same

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002



Upset Trowel

I like glass noodles/sweet potato noodles/bean threads in gyoza, seems like they've got them in Korean dumplings a lot and I put em in mine sometimes.

LyonsLions
Oct 10, 2008

I'm only using 18% of my full power !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


im on the net me boys posted:

I tried hayashi rice and brown stew mixes from the Japanese market (both S&B I think?) and they taste the same

They are the same, both are just a demi-glace sauce base. The cream stew isn't bad, and I hear the cheese one is good, but I haven't come across it yet.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



MockingQuantum posted:

What do you put in your gyoza? My wife is vegetarian and we're trying to figure out a good veggie dumpling/gyoza recipe, but I can't do mushrooms and cabbage is iffy, which cuts out two ingredients that come up in most recipes I see.

also how do you use the corn starch? do you just dab the gyoza in the starch before cooking them?

Tofu can also be good in dumplings. Common in Korean dumplings, in kimchi mandu. Just drained, crumbled, and seasoned along with the other filling ingredients.

Green onions are also a good addition.

Is it all cabbage/brassica that's a problem? Like you could do shredded broccoli stems or kohlrabi or something like that, but if it's all brassica then that's out.

How about Napa cabbage? It's still a Brassica, but is more distantly related to green cabbage than broccoli is from green cabbage; it's Brassica rapa instead of Brassica oleracea. Of course if you just have problems with cruciferous vegetables in general don't go shoving napa cabbage into your mouth.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012




Eeyo posted:

Tofu can also be good in dumplings. Common in Korean dumplings, in kimchi mandu. Just drained, crumbled, and seasoned along with the other filling ingredients.

Green onions are also a good addition.

Is it all cabbage/brassica that's a problem? Like you could do shredded broccoli stems or kohlrabi or something like that, but if it's all brassica then that's out.

How about Napa cabbage? It's still a Brassica, but is more distantly related to green cabbage than broccoli is from green cabbage; it's Brassica rapa instead of Brassica oleracea. Of course if you just have problems with cruciferous vegetables in general don't go shoving napa cabbage into your mouth.

Thankfully it just seems to be red/green/Chinese cabbage, though I haven't had Napa in ages. I don't remember it making me sick, and in any case broccoli doesn't bother me at all so that's an easy substitution.

Last time we did shallots, green onions, cabbage, carrots, garlic, and a little bit of Beni Shouga, and that was pretty good other than the cabbage making me feel pretty sick afterwards. I'm guessing putting beni shouga in gyoza isn't very normal, but we had it and it tasted good, lol.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



The broccoli will have some of the flavors of cabbage but I imagine the texture may end up a bit different. It'll be more similar to shredded carrots you put in dumplings, so probably just treat them like you treat the carrots. May want to peel the stems too. I don't mind the broccoli skin when it's chopped, but I think you'll notice it more if you're grating or shredding it.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

Iím cooking with a donabe for the first time tomorrow. I just now looked at the manual for the iwatani butane stove we got to use it with and it says that it should only be used indoors in a professional setting with ventilation, but Iíve seen people use the stoves in their homes before. Should I just use the stove outside and bring the donabe in or is it safe to use indoors if I keep the windows open?

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




I'm sure that's there for cover your rear end purposes. Everybody uses those inside, it's fine. Crack a window if you're worried.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

Grand Fromage posted:

I'm sure that's there for cover your rear end purposes. Everybody uses those inside, it's fine. Crack a window if you're worried.

Thank you. I figured itíd be fine with a window open but Iím very prone to worrying about these sort of things

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me



I use mine inside all the time.

captkirk
Feb 5, 2010


im on the net me boys posted:

I’m cooking with a donabe for the first time tomorrow. I just now looked at the manual for the iwatani butane stove we got to use it with and it says that it should only be used indoors in a professional setting with ventilation, but I’ve seen people use the stoves in their homes before. Should I just use the stove outside and bring the donabe in or is it safe to use indoors if I keep the windows open?

Hahaha, I was going to post the same thing. I assumed it was a CYA thing more than anything else.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

Everyone at home enjoyed the nabe but I spoiled my appetite by eating too many snacks before dinner :/ but I did have some and enjoyed it a lot

Mykroft
Aug 25, 2005






Dinosaur Gum

im on the net me boys posted:

Everyone at home enjoyed the nabe but I spoiled my appetite by eating too many snacks before dinner :/ but I did have some and enjoyed it a lot

What did you use for your broth/base?

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

Mykroft posted:

What did you use for your broth/base?

I bought a ready to go shoyu base from the grocery because I wanted the first time to be easy while I learned how to work with a gas burner again

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







My local ethnic grocery seems to be all out of Otafuku okonomiyaki sauce and not really in a hurry to restock based on the last few times I stopped by.

Thereís quite a few recipes on YouTube so Iím willing to put in some work, but does anyone have anything on hand they can recommend that tastes similar to the pre-packaged Otafuku sauce? I guess the obvious upside here would be that if I nail it I donít need to worry about buying the genuine article again.

hakimashou
Jul 15, 2002



Upset Trowel

Martytoof posted:

My local ethnic grocery seems to be all out of Otafuku okonomiyaki sauce and not really in a hurry to restock based on the last few times I stopped by.

Thereís quite a few recipes on YouTube so Iím willing to put in some work, but does anyone have anything on hand they can recommend that tastes similar to the pre-packaged Otafuku sauce? I guess the obvious upside here would be that if I nail it I donít need to worry about buying the genuine article again.

Amazon has a 78 oz jug of it for 15 bucks with free shipping

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003







Iím definitely not seeing that on .com or .ca, but it could be because theyíre only showing stuff that can be shipped to Canada? Either way, I guess it would be cool to be able to just make it at will.

Martytoof fucked around with this message at 23:50 on Dec 26, 2020

Yond Cassius
May 22, 2010

horny is prohibited

Martytoof posted:

Iím definitely not seeing that on .com or .ca, but it could be because theyíre only showing stuff that can be shipped to Canada? Either way, I guess it would be cool to be able to just make it at will.

Here's the listing, just so you can check.

Kevin DuBrow
Apr 21, 2012

as requested

Made some yakionigiri at my partner's urging. They certainly looked attractive and nicely browned with the sauce, and people really liked them, but I just found myself preferring good old onigiri. I think dango delivers the same flavor as the yakionigiri sauce in a much more delicious way.

Mongoose
Jul 7, 2005


I always ended a meal at the crowded neighborhood yakitori shop with yaki onigiri and miso soup. There's plenty of ways to yak an onigiri, but I think they did a miso-based sauce and likely grilled the ball for a bit over the charcoal before brushing on the miso mix and searing it. The flavors were very different than a sweet mitarashi dango profile. I'd highly recommend trying one using good miso.

a cyborg mug
Mar 8, 2010







Tried pot barley with curry. I like barley a lot but feel like it has too much of a distinct flavor to work the way I want it to with curry? Also itís a bit too loose and doesnít absorb the sauce the way rice does.

So, my quest for potential rice substitutes continues. Quinoa is nowadays cultivated in Finland too and I might try that one next. Anyone ITT have experiences with quinoa as a replacement for rice in Japanese dishes?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me



Out of curiosity is there a reason you are avoiding rice?

a cyborg mug
Mar 8, 2010







hallo spacedog posted:

Out of curiosity is there a reason you are avoiding rice?

Rice cultivation is Not Great environmentally plus it canít even be done here, so all rice in Finland comes from far away. Iím not looking to get rid of it altogether but maybe itís a good idea to find something more sustainable - well, unless something works so well I donít have to buy rice anymore I guess!

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

Cauliflower works reasonably well but only if you serve the rice as a side dish with something not if you cook a dish that contains rice. You just shred it until it has the approximate grain size, then put it in the microwave for 3 minutes to release some steam and then fry it up in a pan with a splotch of butter until slightly browned.

Not perfect but also not bad.

Gaius Marius
Oct 9, 2012



Maybe try orzo.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Porpoise noise continues.


Hmm, that's an interesting problem to have. I'm usually a carb substitution whiz, but for some reason I'm having trouble thinking of something that's Really Like Rice. Orzo was the best thing I could think of, but that's already been suggested. Maybe something like spaetzle? Would a rice noodle spaetzle be good or gross, I wonder?

If you like shirataki, shirataki "rice" is pretty good!

Arven
Sep 23, 2007


About half the time I make curry I put it over quinoa instead of rice and it owns. It's important that you wash it like you do rice or it has a very overpowering flavor though.

im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

Instead of putting potatoes in your curry, mash them and use that instead of rice

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



You could try bulgur or couscous; they're both forms of wheat and I guess wheat grows in Finland*. I don't know if you know much about couscous or bulgur, so I'll explain them briefly. Couscous is basically little balls of wheat that are par-steamed. There's 2 things called couscous: a fine-grained (really tiny grains, like a fraction the size of a rice grain) couscous, and an Israeli couscous that's more similar to Orzo. I've never had the Israeli kind. The fine-grained couscous is often made by just pouring boiling water over the grain and letting it steam. You get a fluffy, soft, and separate grains that have a mild taste.

Bulgur is wheat which has been par-cooked, then cracked into various sizes. I've only bought the fine-grain stuff. You can cook it kind of like couscous, but it can need a bit of extra steaming to get it cooked. I've often done it like couscous then microwaved it briefly to give it extra steaming. The end result of the fine-grained stuff is similar to couscous; fluffy, separate grains that are very small, but maybe a bit more chewy. It also has a mild flavor. Bulgur is also considered a whole grain since it's par-cooked with the bran on then crushed.

*Probably any couscous or bulgur you buy wasn't produced locally

Myron Baloney
Mar 19, 2002

I believe in romance


Wedge Regret

I really like crusty bread or rolls better than rice with curry, and I suppose farro or wild rice would work too, although wild rice probably isn't common in Finland. I bet it would grow well there though.

edit: I bet mantou would work well too, all you need for those is flour, yeast and a steamer.

Myron Baloney fucked around with this message at 03:09 on Dec 31, 2020

a cyborg mug
Mar 8, 2010







明けましておめでとう Japanese food thread!

Thanks for all the thoughts on rice replacements.

Arven posted:

About half the time I make curry I put it over quinoa instead of rice and it owns. It's important that you wash it like you do rice or it has a very overpowering flavor though.

I tried using quinoa today! Made a gyudon and I thought it worked really quite well. Rice cooker had zero problems with it, no foaming of any kind. Doesn't quite stick together like short-grain rice but enough to be chopstick-friendly. Tasted good, just a bit different from rice. I would've liked a bit more chewiness in the texture but that's a matter of getting used to. I'm pleased and definitely will experiment more with quinoa. It's a bit expensive, however, especially the Finnish products.

Hopper posted:

Cauliflower works reasonably well but only if you serve the rice as a side dish with something not if you cook a dish that contains rice. You just shred it until it has the approximate grain size, then put it in the microwave for 3 minutes to release some steam and then fry it up in a pan with a splotch of butter until slightly browned.

Not perfect but also not bad.

I've heard about cauliflower rice multiple times and always thought it sounds pretty weird. Like cauliflower has a pretty distinct flavor and how can the texture work? But then I thought about it a bit more and it doesn't actually sound that crazy after all. Might have to give it a go one day just to see what it's like. Does it stick together at all?

Gaius Marius posted:

Maybe try orzo.

Interesting. It looks like it's available here and pretty reasonably priced as well. Will try it if I can remember to buy it some day, although I have my doubts about its taste as a replacement for rice? Also, it's pasta, does it absorb sauces in any meaningful capacity..?

Fleta Mcgurn posted:

If you like shirataki, shirataki "rice" is pretty good!

Haven't actually tried shirataki although I'm intrigued by it! Some of the Asian shops here have at least shirataki noodles, will keep an eye out for shirataki rice. A quick googling didn't produce any meaningful results about its ecological impact. Konjac definitely isn't cultivated here and the products seem pretty pricey. Will try it out of interest anyway.

Myron Baloney posted:

I really like crusty bread or rolls better than rice with curry, and I suppose farro or wild rice would work too, although wild rice probably isn't common in Finland. I bet it would grow well there though.

edit: I bet mantou would work well too, all you need for those is flour, yeast and a steamer.

Farro/emmer is unfortunately scarcely available here and pretty expensive. Looks like there's been some discussion about growing wild rice in Finland but I don't think it's gone anywhere yet.

Eeyo posted:

You could try bulgur or couscous; they're both forms of wheat and I guess wheat grows in Finland*. I don't know if you know much about couscous or bulgur, so I'll explain them briefly. Couscous is basically little balls of wheat that are par-steamed. There's 2 things called couscous: a fine-grained (really tiny grains, like a fraction the size of a rice grain) couscous, and an Israeli couscous that's more similar to Orzo. I've never had the Israeli kind. The fine-grained couscous is often made by just pouring boiling water over the grain and letting it steam. You get a fluffy, soft, and separate grains that have a mild taste.

Bulgur is wheat which has been par-cooked, then cracked into various sizes. I've only bought the fine-grain stuff. You can cook it kind of like couscous, but it can need a bit of extra steaming to get it cooked. I've often done it like couscous then microwaved it briefly to give it extra steaming. The end result of the fine-grained stuff is similar to couscous; fluffy, separate grains that are very small, but maybe a bit more chewy. It also has a mild flavor. Bulgur is also considered a whole grain since it's par-cooked with the bran on then crushed.

*Probably any couscous or bulgur you buy wasn't produced locally

Thanks for the effort post! I'm actually familiar with both. Unfortunately yeah neither is produced here, although both are available and reasonably cheap.

im on the net me boys posted:

Instead of putting potatoes in your curry, mash them and use that instead of rice

Not a bad idea but a big part of using rice in the kitchen for me is how effortless it is, especially when using a rice cooker. Potatoes need peeling and a relatively long cooking time.

a cyborg mug fucked around with this message at 22:05 on Jan 5, 2021

Carillon
May 9, 2014





You know yourself here and if you'd enjoy it, but you definitely don't need to peel potatoes. Not sure if you have them, but I've found small red potatoes cook pretty quickly and then can be smooshed out easily. Might still be too long and you might not enjoy the peels, but I don't really peel most potatoes and it works great.

Halloween Liker
Oct 31, 2020



Leave on the peel and "mash" them with a stick blender.

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im on the net me boys
Feb 19, 2017

Hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhjhhhhhhjhhhhhhhhhjjjhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh cannabis

I think hayashi rice is a new favorite in my family. Iíve made it a few times and we never have leftovers.

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